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DOUSSAN FAMILY PAPERS

(Mss. 4800)

Inventory

 

 

 

Contents of Inventory

 

Summary                                                                                                                                                                                                  

Biographical/Historical Note                                         

Scope and Content Note                                                                                                                               

List of Series and Subseries                                          

Series and Subseries Descriptions                                

Index Terms                                                                 

Appendix A:  Item level descriptions                                                                

Appendix B:   Names Appearing in Correspondence (Series I) and Financial Papers (Series II)

Summary

 

Size                                             94 items

 

Geographic

Locations                                  Louisiana; Mississippi; Alabama; Texas; Missouri;

Kentucky; New York; Cuba; France; England; Italy; Holland; Germany   

 

Inclusive                                   

Dates                                          1827-1872, n.d.

 

Languages                                French

 

Summary                                  Correspondence, financial papers, and personal papers of members of the Doussan family of East and West Baton Rouge Parishes, Louisiana, and France.  Correspondence of Charles de Rabars of Bordeaux, France, is also included, as is a letter from General Baron Joachim Ambert.  Most documents reflect the Doussans’ planting operations in West Baton Rouge Parish; their financial and legal transactions in Louisiana and France; family activities, interests, and concerns; and the experience of French émigrés in Louisiana as they encountered Anglo-American culture and society.

 

Restrictions                              No restrictions

 

Related Collections               Ambert (Joachim) Papers (Mss. #1356)

                                                     Turnbull-Allain Family Papers (Mss. #4261)

 

Copyright                                 Physical rights and copyright are retained by the LSU Libraries. 

 

 

Citation                                     Doussan Family Papers, Mss. #4800, Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

 

Stack location                                       U: 300             


 

 

Biographical/Historical Note

 

The Doussans were an émigré French family who came to Louisiana in the wake of Napoleon’s downfall. The patriarch, Antoine, managed the family’s cotton and sugar plantation in West Baton Rouge Parish as well as French-resident members’ financial affairs in Louisiana.  Doussan even explored silk cultivation in the state. A medical doctor, he corresponded for decades with his brother Auguste in France from the time the younger sibling was studying medicine in Paris until well after the latter had settled into practice in Grasse. 

 

Antoine had served in Napoleon’s army with Charles de Rabars, a resident of the Bordeaux region of France.  De Rabars also maintained a lengthy correspondence with Auguste, a relationship initiated at Antoine’s behest. Over the years, De Rabars moved from helping Antoine keep tabs on Auguste to depending upon Auguste to assist with De Rabars’ problem son, also named Charles. 

 

Auguste and Antoine Doussan took it upon themselves to be advisers for less fortunate family members both in France and Louisiana about education, finances, and legal matters. By the mid 1850s, Louis Sheppers had succeeded Antoine in managing affairs in Louisiana for Auguste and Auguste’s wife, Louise Perrin Doussan, who eventually moved from Grasse to Paris. At the advent of the 1860s, Louise entrusted her Louisiana affairs to her cousin, H.M. Favrot.

 

Louise Perrin Doussan was a relative of the Allain family of Louisiana.  The Allains were related by marriage to General Baron Joachim Ambert, a French military officer and nobleman with whom Antoine and Auguste also dealt.

 

 

Scope and Content Note

 

Correspondence, financial papers, and personal papers of members of the Doussan family of East and West Baton Rouge Parishes, Louisiana, and France make up this collection. Correspondence of Charles de Rabars of Bordeaux, France, is also included, as is a letter from General Baron Joachim Ambert.  Most documents reflect the Doussans’ planting operations in West Baton Rouge Parish; their financial and legal transactions in  Louisiana and France; family activities, interests, and concerns; and the experience of French émigrés in Louisiana as they encountered Anglo-American culture and society.

 

Letters (1827-1849, n.d.) are from Antoine Doussan in Louisiana, to his brother Auguste in France. Also included during the same dates is lengthy correspondence from Charles de Rabars in the Gironde region of France to Auguste as well as a letter from General Baron Joachim Ambert (Chartres, France, July 13, 1849) to the same.  One of the few items not addressed to Auguste or to his wife, Louise, is a September 21, 1842, letter from Antoine in Baton Rouge to Jean Joseph Merle in Gourdon, France.  The financial papers (1842-1872) consist of statements concerning Auguste and Louise’s American properties and business transactions as administered by their Baton Rouge agents (Antoine Doussan, 1842-1853; Louis Sheppers, 1854-1860; and H.M. Favrot, early 1860s-1872).   

 

 

List of Series

 

 

I.   Correspondence, 1827-1849, n.d. (box 1 of 1, folders 1-6)

 

II.  Financial Papers, 1842-1872 (box 1 of 1, folders 7-9)

 

 

 

Series Descriptions

 

I. Correspondence, 1827-1849, n.d. (.3 linear feet)

 

Antoine Doussan’s correspondence shows the writer’s role as patriarch of the Doussan family in both Europe and the United States. Antoine advises family members and keeps an eye on their education, careers, and social interactions while managing the Doussan plantation in West Baton Rouge Parish, all of which he relates to Auguste.  The bulk of the correspondence concerns family business and activities (including the affairs of the Allains and other families), personal news, gossip, and commentary on current events.  Antoine pays much attention to climatic and economic conditions both within Louisiana and beyond the borders of the state and sheds light on many agricultural, legal, commercial, and financial practices of the day.  At times, he comments briefly on politics and particular legislation affecting his family directly.  Antoine’s letters also initially touch upon Auguste’s medical schooling in Paris and later the latter’s medical practice in Grasse.

 

De Rabars’ letters likewise focus on familial concerns and activities, personal and communal health, weather, and the economy.  De Rabars elaborates upon the importance of friendship, recounts natural disasters such as drought and cholera epidemics in the Gironde, and provides occasional, mostly passing references to sociopolitical issues and military service.

 

An anonymous epistolary document included among the correspondence and dated March 18, 1832, is a long draft of a treatise on United States government as compared to European governments.

 

II.  Financial Papers, 1842-1872  (.3 linear feet)

 

The financial papers (statements of transactions and accompanying commentaries) provide information on individuals and families with whom the Doussans had legal, commercial, and financial dealings as well as the establishments through which the Doussans conducted business.  The majority of these persons and institutions were concentrated in Louisiana, specifically, Baton Rouge and West Baton Rouge Parish. Beyond the Baton Rouge area, the Doussans conducted business with many prominent companies in New Orleans, other parts of the United States, and Europe. 


 

 

Index Terms

 

Materials about the person, place or thing indicated may be found in the series respresented by their respective numbers.

 

Agriculture---Southern States---History---19th Century

             I-II

Allain Family

             I-II

Ambert Family

             I-II

Ambert, Joachim

             I-II

Ambert, Julie

             I-II

Bank of Louisiana

             I-II

Banks and Banking---France---History---19th Century

             I-II

Banks and Banking---Louisiana---History---19th Century

             I-II

Banks and Banking---United States---History---19th Century

             I-II

Baton Rouge (La.)—History—19th Century

             I-II

Books and Reading---France---19th Century

             I

Books and Reading---Louisiana---19th Century

             I

Bordeaux (France)---History---19th Century

             I-II

Botany---Study and Teaching---France---19th Century

             I

Children of the Rich---Education---France---19th Century

             I

Cholera---France---History---19th Century

             I

Citizens’ Bank of Louisiana

             I-II

Commission Merchants---France

             I-II

Commission Merchants---Louisiana

             I-II

Commission Merchants---United States

             I-II

Cotton Farmers---Louisiana---West Baton Rouge Parish---History---19th Century

             I-II

Cotton Growing---Louisiana---West Baton Rouge Parish---History---19th Century

             I-II

Doussan, Antoine J.

             I-II

Doussan, Auguste Alexandre

             I-II

Doussan, Émile

             I

Doussan, Guillaume

             I

Doussan, Lise

             I-II

Doussan, Louis

             I

Doussan, Louise Perrin

             I-II

Droughts---Cuba---History---19th Century

             I

Droughts---France---History---19th Century

             I

Droughts---Louisiana---History---19th Century

             I

Emigrants and Immigrants---Louisiana---19th Century

             I-II

Europe, Western---Politics and Government

             I

Favrot, H.M.

             II

Floods---Mississippi River---19th Century

             I

France---Climate---19th Century

             I

France---Economic Conditions---19th Century

             I-II

France---History---18th Century, 19th Century

             I

France---Politics and Government---18th Century, 19th Century

             I-II

France---Social Life and Customs---19th Century

             I-II

French Americans---Louisiana

             I-II

Gironde (France)---History---19th Century

             I-II

Gourdon (France)---History---19th Century

             I-II

Grasse (France)---History---19th Century

             I-II

Lard

             I

Levees---Louisiana

             I

Libourne (France)---History---19th Century

             I

Louisiana---Climate---19th Century

             I

Louisiana---Economic Conditions---19th Century

             I-II

Louisiana---History---19th Century

             I-II

Louisiana---Politics and Government---19th Century

             I-II

Louisiana---Social Life and Customs---19th Century

             I-II

Male Friendship—France---19th Century

             I

Man-Woman Relationships---France---19th Century

             I

Medical Students---France---19th Century

             I

Medicine---Practice---France---19th Century

             I

Medicine---Study and Teaching---France---19th Century

             I

Merchant Ships---France---History---19th Century

             I-II

Merchant Ships---United States---History---19th Century

             I-II

Mississippi---Economic Conditions---19th Century

             I-II

Mississippi---History---19th Century

             I-II

Mississippi River Valley---Commerce---History---19th Century

             I-II

Mississippi River Valley---History---19th Century

             I-II

Natchez (Ms.)---History---19th Century

             I

New Orleans (La.)---History---19th Century

             I-II

Paris (France)---History---19th Century

             I-II

Passenger Ships---France---History---19th Century

             I-II

Passenger Ships---United States---History---19th Century

             I-II

Plantation Life---Louisiana---History---19th Century

             I-II

Plantation Owners---Louisiana---19th Century

             I-II

Plantations---Louisiana---19th Century

             I-II

Provence (France)---History---19th Century

             I-II

Rabars, Charles de and Family

             I

Robertson, Thomas Bolling

             I

Sericulture---Louisiana

I

Sheppers, Louis

             II

Slaves—Louisiana---19th Century

             I-II

Sugar Growing---Louisiana---History---19th Century

             I-II

Sugar Growing---Louisiana---West Baton Rouge Parish---History---19th Century

             I-II

Sweet Potatoes

             I

Var (France)---History---19th Century

             I-II

West Baton Rouge Parish (La.)---History---19th Century

             I-II

West Baton Rouge Parish (La.)---Politics and Government---19th Century

             I-II

West Baton Rouge Parish (La.)---Social Life and Customs---19th Century

             I-II

 

 

 

Appendix A:  Item level descriptions

 

I.                      Correspondence, 1827-1849, n.d.

 

---Baton Rouge, December 5, 1827, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan at Hôtel des Abeilles, Rue du Foin St. Jacques, Paris.  Antoine advises Auguste not to dwell on botany to the exclusion of the sciences of healing and to study botany as a doctor, not a naturalist.  The same applies to physics, math, and chemistry. Auguste needs to focus on clinical lectures.  Antoine imagines Auguste will be taking anatomy and physiology.  “Faymoreau” and “Dr. Donadier” are mentioned in a marginal note. Antoine has given Faymoreau a rattlesnake tail and tooth.  Antoine is too far away to direct Auguste’s studies, so he suggests that Auguste attach himself to a professor who can advise him.  Antoine is angry over the absence of a professorial chair for such advising.  Antoine instructs Auguste to receive Faymoreau well, and the latter can tell Auguste more about Antoine. Antoine wants Auguste and Faymoreau to get him a Lamark botany (or any botany that might be better) as well as a microscope for botany.  Antoine has authorized Maison [Peltier?] to augment Auguste’s monthly allowance. Antoine admonishes Auguste to buy only those books necessary for his studies.  Antoine describes his personal library.  In a postscript, the writer adds, “Ta belle-soeur t’envoie par Faymoreau dix piastres pour tes étrennes du jour de l’an.”

 

---Bordeaux, France, August 4, 1828, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan at Hôtel des Abeilles, Paris.  De Rabars had received a letter from Auguste’s brother dated June 14, Baton Rouge. Auguste’s brother’s wife has been ill since her mother’s death.  Brother and wife are going to spend six months in a climate better than Louisiana’s, coming to France next summer if her health permits.  Auguste’s brother wants Auguste and De Rabars to be in contact with each other.  De Rabars says he served in the military with Auguste’s brother, who cared for De Rabars after the latter was gravely wounded in the right shoulder at the end of the last campaign in Italy in 1813.  They have not seen much of each other since the events of 1814 other than during Doussan’s last trip to France, the memories of which De Rabars’ family still cherish.  De Rabars works for customs at Bordeaux, where he has been with his wife and two children for a year. His son is 12 and in a “collège.” His daughter is 10 and is receiving her education at her mother’s side. 

 

---Bordeaux, August 22, 1828, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan at Hôtel des Abeilles, Paris. De Rabars brings up Madame de Sévigné as an example of a good letter writer.  De Rabars talks about his new friendship with Auguste and about Auguste’s sister-in-law’s sufferings following her mother’s death.

 

---Bordeaux, November 21, 1828, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan at Hôtel des Abeilles, Paris. Again, De Rabars talks about his friendship with Auguste and speaks well of Auguste’s brother (Antoine, referred to as “Doussan”).  De Rabars realizes that if everything is satisfactory with Antoine in Baton Rouge, he will not visit France; thus, De Rabars is saddened by the prospect that they might never see each other again.  De Rabars has not been well and lists his ailments.

 

---Bordeaux, September 15, 1829, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan at Hôtel des Abeilles, Paris.  De Rabars and daughter had been sick.  De Rabars gives Auguste advice concerning women.

 

---Bordeaux, November 26, 1829, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan at Hôtel des Abeilles, Paris. De Rabars is upset over having gone to the Hôtel des Abeilles when he was in Paris to pay a surprise visit on Auguste, only to have the latter not be present.  The writer mentions Béranger in passing.  De Rabars is mad at Auguste’s brother for not having written.

 

---Barège, France, August 6, 1830, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan at Hôtel des Abeilles, Paris.  De Rabars is concerned about Auguste in the wake of the July Revolution of 1830 in Paris and wonders if Auguste is even in the city.  De Rabars is sorry that he was not in Bordeaux to receive Auguste’s friend, and he playfully expresses jealousy while reiterating his affection for Auguste. De Rabars’ daughter is in much better health, and the family has been mountain climbing.

 

Bordeaux, January 7, 1831, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan, Rue du Cloître Saint Benoît, Paris.  De Rabars mentions that people have been suffering from political events and financial reversals.  He is going to spend time in the country near Libourne after having been ill and will keep an apartment in town for the sake of his children.  He wants Auguste to visit him in the country before the latter goes to New England. De Rabars complains about Auguste’s brother (“l’Américain”) for not writing.

 

---(Written at “Brun” ?), Mailed from Libourne, France, March 12, 1831, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan, Rue Cloître St. Benoît, Paris.  De Rabars wants Auguste to spend time in the Bordeaux area before Auguste leaves France for Louisiana.  Auguste should encounter no trouble traveling as long as there is no war with England.

 

---(Brun?), April 26, 1831, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan.  De Rabars is saddened and has not written because he has lost a brother. Again he expresses how much he would like to see Auguste.

 

---Mailed from Libourne, Written at “Brun” (?), June 18-19, 1831, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan at Grand Hôtel de Castille, Boulevard des Italiens, Paris.  De Rabars elaborates upon friendship again, especially as it exists between men of different ages.  De Rabars now loves Auguste as much as the former does Antoine, whom he has known for 20 years.

 

---August 2, 1831, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan in Gourdon near Grasse, Var, France. De Rabars mentions that Auguste wrote little while in Digne and hopes that he will write more while in Gourdon. De Rabars says that Auguste’s brother Louis is with “Doussan” (Auguste’s other brother Antoine), who has arrived in France.  De Rabars is happy that the Doussan brothers together will be revisiting the place of their childhood (Gourdon).  A Mr. Sarpy is mentioned. In the middle of the letter, De Rabars injects the English line: “Farewell my dear friend I love you very much.”

 

---Mailed from Libourne September 19, 1831, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan at Grand Hôtel de Castille, Paris.  De Rabars now addresses Auguste with the familiar tu.  Before this letter, they had finally met in person, and the subsequent separation has been hard for De Rabars.  Auguste left a surgical instrument behind, and De Rabars wants to know if Auguste wants it mailed to him or if the writer should hold onto it until Auguste returns.

 

---(Brun?), September 30, 1831, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan, Grand Hôtel de Castille, Paris.  De Rabars quotes Dr. Primrose from Oliver Goldsmith’s VICAR OF WAKEFIELD.

 

---(Brun?), September 22, 1832, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan in Baton Rouge, “État de la Nlle. Orléans.”  De Rabars deplores the sociopolitical situation in France and mentions the advance of cholera in the Bordeaux area as well as the measures being taken to avoid the epidemic.  He says that Auguste is now married to Louise [née Perrin], and he hopes that things go well.  De Rabars complains about the trouble that his son has caused him, but the younger De Rabars has been home for a while and has returned to his old self.  De Rabars mentions the drought in the Bordeaux area. He wants to know if the vine slips he had sent Auguste’s brother arrived, and he will want to know if they survive in the future.  The writer says that if Dubroca [apparently in Louisiana] remembers him, then remember De Rabars to Dubroca and tell the latter about De Rabars’ nephew Dunogué.

 

---March 18, 1832, Anonymous draft of a letter to “Mon Cher Ami.”  “Dedicace au comte de [scratched out] Thibeaudou [or Thibeaudon].” This draft with many corrections on it is a lengthy treatise on United States government as compared to European governments.

 

---Baton Rouge, December 2, 1835, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  The writer relates business transactions that he is performing in Louisiana for Auguste and Louise Doussan.  He mentions dealings with Guillaume Doussan and discusses Doussan slaves and their costs.

 

---New Orleans, February 14, 1840, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  [Auguste Doussan is by this time a doctor in Grasse, France.] The writer relates business transactions.  He brings up “Dr. Patrick” as the purchaser of Auguste Doussan’s plantation.

 

---May 19, 1840, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan in Grasse.  The writer relates that “Monsieur Valérien and Célestine” have arrived.  He complains about Joachim and Julie Ambert’s short stay in Louisiana before their return to France as well as their apparent disdain for the place of Julie’s birth.  Doussan mentions Dubroca and discusses business transactions.  He gives details surrounding a powerful “coup de vent” that devastated Natchez, Mississippi, and comments on economic conditions in Louisiana and Mississippi.

 

---Baton Rouge, June 11, 1840, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan in Grasse.  Antoine presents Auguste the projected itinerary and expenses for their nephew’s stay in France.  The writer mentions another Doussan brother – Louis – as well as Auguste’s son Émile.

 

---(Brun?), Mailed from Libourne, June 30, 1841, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan at Grasse.  The writer does not know where Auguste is, but he is sending the letter to Grasse.  De Rabars mentions that his son had been sent to Africa for military service, got sick, was put in a hospital in Algiers, and was then sent to Aix, where he is now at a convalescent home.  Charles the younger has run up many expenses.  He had committed “folies” in his regiment at Lyons (which is why he had been sent to Africa).  Charles the elder is greatly humiliated and wants Auguste to take the son into Auguste’s home for a while.  Charles the elder’s wife is suffering from all of this as well, but their daughter, Mathilde, is their consolation.  De Rabars lists Mathilde’s good qualities.  The writer relates that he was 40 when he made Auguste’s acquaintance, and now he is 50.

 

---Baton Rouge, June 7, 1842, and New Orleans, July 10, 1842, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan in Grasse.  Antoine is glad to know that Auguste has arrived safely in France.  Antoine relates his trip to New Orleans along with business transactions.

 

---Baton Rouge, June 18, 1842, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  Mostly business.

 

---Baton Rouge, September 19, 1842, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan in Grasse.  Mostly business.

 

---Baton Rouge, September 19, 1842, Antoine Doussan to Jean Joseph Merle at Gourdon, France. Mainly a business letter.

 

---Baton Rouge, June 15, 1843-June 16, 1843, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  Antoine hopes to go to France to visit Auguste before death separates the two.  The writer mentions “la méthode de Jacotot.”  He comments on François Gardère’s term as state treasurer.  He relates Achille Hébert’s theft, capture, imprisonment, release, and disappearance.  Antoine gives the names of slaves who are part of some business transactions.

 

---Baton Rouge, August 2, 1843, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan in Grasse.  The writer talks about the incessant rains and floods in southern Louisiana as well as the condition of crops there and in other Southern states.

 

---Baton Rouge, November 15, 1843, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  Antoine recommends the Courrier des États-Unis to Auguste as the best Franco-American gazette. Antoine is impatiently awaiting the Herbier Général de l’Amateur, which he has asked Auguste to get for him.  Antoine addresses the last part of the letter to Auguste’s wife, Louise, telling her the latest concerning her relatives. 

 

---n.d., Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  Business transactions mainly.

 

---n.d., Last page of a letter from Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan in Grasse, stamped May 29, 1843, Marseille.

 

---Baton Rouge, February 22, 1844, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan at Grasse.  Antoine relates the details of sending sweet potatoes to certain people in France.

 

---Baton Rouge, April 12, 1844-May 3, 1844, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  Family matters and business are discussed.

 

---Baton Rouge, May 3, 1844, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  Antoine comments on the Louisiana interest law of the 1820s-1840s and Governor Thomas Bolling Robertson’s part in it.

 

---Baton Rouge, May 16, 1844, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan in Grasse.  Antoine mentions the two-months drought in Louisiana and six-months drought in Cuba.

 

---Baton Rouge, August 3, 1844, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  The Herbier Général has arrived.  Doussan relates the unusual weather that has marked the past year with floods and levee breaks on the Mississippi River all the way up to St. Louis, Missouri.

 

---Baton Rouge, November 29 and December 6, 1844, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan. Antoine complains about problems involving some of the people with whom he must conduct business.

 

---February 5, 1845, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  The writer discusses legalization of baptismal records for Émile Doussan (Auguste’s son and Antoine’s godson).

 

---February 5, 1845, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  Business.

 

---Baton Rouge, May 15, 1845, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan in Grasse.  Mostly business.

 

---Baton Rouge, July 4, 1845, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan in Grasse.  Antoine has not heard from Auguste in a long time and wants to be brought up to date on their nephew.  Antoine cannot afford the nephew’s prolonged schooling in France and wants the boy to come stay with him in Louisiana.  Antoine will plant some mulberry trees in hopes of getting the nephew to develop a silkworm nursery.  If not too expensive, Antoine would like to see the boy educated outside of Provence in order to lose the Provençal accent.

 

---Baton Rouge, November 1, 1845, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan in Grasse.  Antoine speaks more about what he thinks their nephew should study and pursue.

 

---Baton Rouge, November 2, 1845, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan in Grasse.  Antoine congratulates Auguste for successfully performing cataract surgery.  The writer discusses France’s views on the legality of marriages conducted in the United States.  He says he wants their oldest brother (Louis)’s oldest son to study silkworm cultivation.

 

---Baton Rouge, December 9, 1845, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  More discussion of the study of silk production.

 

---Baton Rouge, February 3, 1846, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  The writer mentions the Chopin family rift over a son’s marrying a servant.

 

---April 10, 1846, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  Antoine relates more concerning the Chopin family rift.

 

---Baton Rouge, May 20, 1846, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.  This letter also contains detailed financial statements.

 

---Baton Rouge, January 3, 1847, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan.

 

---Baton Rouge, February 25 and March 19, 1847, Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan. Antoine asserts that he will always relate to Auguste as a father to a son.

 

---Chartres, France, July 13, 1849, Joachim Ambert to Auguste Doussan.  The letter concerns a copy of a marriage contract.

 

---“Copie de la Lettre Écrite à Ambert le 19 Juillet 1849.”  The letter concerns the legality of a marriage contract.

 

---August 3, 1849, Mailed from Libourne, France, Charles de Rabars to Auguste Doussan in Grasse.  De Rabars relates an outbreak of cholera in the Bordeaux region.

 

---n.d. [“18 décembre” appears on the last page], Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan. Antoine knows of the spread of cholera in France.  Antoine comments that his neighbors are selling their properties so rapidly to Americans that soon he will be surrounded by nothing but Americans.

 

---n.d., “Copie Complète des Articles du Contrat de Mariage de Mr et Mme Ambert, Reçu par Mes Berceon et Huillier, Notaires à Paris, Ce 12 Mars 1838.”

 

 

 

II. Financial Papers, 1842-1872

 

---Baton Rouge, June 14, 1842, “Auguste Doussan Son Compte Courant avec A.J. Doussan.” Statements for May 1841and for January-June 1842.

 

---On outside: “Règlement du Compte entre Ursin Soniat et Auguste Doussan le Mois de Mars 1842.”  On inside: “Monsieur U. Soniat Doit à Aug. Doussan/M. Aug. Doussan Doit à U. Soniat.”  Statements for May 1839-May 1842.

 

---“Aug. Doussan Son Compte Courant avec A.J. Doussan.”  Statements for March 1843-May 1844.

 

---Baton Rouge, May 13, 1845, “Auguste Doussan Son Compte Courant avec A.J. Doussan.” Statements for May 1844-May 1845.

 

---Statement for May 13, 1845.

 

---May 4, 1847, “Auguste Doussan de Grasse Son Compte Courant avec A.J. Doussan de B. Rouge.” Statements from May 1846-May 1847.

 

---May 5, 1848, “Auguste Doussan Son Compte Courant avec A.J. Doussan.”  Statements for May 1847-May 1848.

 

---May 9, 1849, “Auguste Doussan Son Compte Courant avec A.J. Doussan.”  Statements for May 1848-May 1849.

 

---1849, “Copie de la Procuration Envoyée à Antoine Doussan.”  Copy of an 1849 document in which Auguste Alexandre Doussan and Louise Perrin Doussan confer upon Antoine Doussan the right to manage their holdings in Louisiana.

 

---Baton Rouge, February 28, 1851, “Notes des Billets Appartenant à Aug. Doussan.” Relates to past and projected transactions from March 1850 to August 1852.

 

---Baton Rouge, February 28, 1851, “Auguste Doussan Son Compte Courant avec A.J. Doussan.”  Statements from May 1849 to February 1851.

 

---“Auguste Doussan D.M. à Grasse Son Compte Courant avec A.J. Doussan à Baton Rouge.” (Accompanied by a letter from Antoine Doussan to Auguste Doussan dated April 8, 1852.)  Statements from April 1851 and projected to April 1853.

 

---Baton Rouge, May 4, 1853, “Auguste Doussan en Compte Courant avec Antoine Doussan.” Statements from September 1852 with projections to April 1855.

 

---Baton Rouge, May 10, 1854, “Monsieur Auguste Doussan de Grasse France Son Compte Courant avec Louis Sheppers de Baton Rouge.”  Statements from September 1853 with projections to 1857, plus a letter dated Baton Rouge, May 10, 1854, from Louis Sheppers.

 

---Baton Rouge, June 6, 1855, “Liste des Valeurs Appartenant à Monsieur Auguste Doussan de Grasse (France) entre les Mains de L. Sheppers de Baton Rouge, Louisiane.” Statements from March 1855 with projections to April 1857.  Also a letter from Sheppers dated June 6, 1855.

 

---Baton Rouge, June 6, 1855, “Monsieur Auguste Doussan de Grasse en Compte Courant avec Louis Sheppers, Son Agent à la Louisiane.”  Statements from May 1854 to May 1855.

 

---March 1, 1857, “Madame Louise Doussan en Compte Courant avec Louis Sheppers Son Agent à la Louisiane.”  Statements from March 1856 to March 1857.

 

---Baton Rouge, March 1, 1857, “État des Valeurs Appartenant à Madame Louise Doussan, Demeurant à Paris, entre les Mains de Louis Sheppers Son Agent à la Louisiane.”

 

---Baton Rouge, March 1, 1858, “État des Valeurs Appartenant à  Mme. Louise Doussan de Paris entre les Mains de Louis Sheppers Son Agent à la Louisiane.”  Also contains a letter from Sheppers to Auguste Doussan in Grasse dated March 1, 1858.

 

---Baton Rouge, March 1, 1858, “Madame Louise Doussan Demeurant à Paris en Compte Courant avec Louis Sheppers Son Agent à la Louisiane.”  Statements from March 1857 to February 1858.

 

---“Total des Sommes Placées et des Fonds en Caisse au 1er Mars 1857.”

 

---Baton Rouge, March 1, 1859, “Madame Louise Doussan Demeurant à Paris S/Compte Courant avec Louis Sheppers , Son Agent à la Louisiane.”  Statements from March 1858 to February 1859.

 

---Baton Rouge, March 29, 1859, Louis Sheppers to Auguste Doussan in Grasse, France. Sheppers notes, “La demoralisation progressive de ce pays ci est vraiment faite pour décourager d’y faire des affaires.”

 

---Baton Rouge, March 1, 1859, “État des Valeurs Appartenant à Madame Louise Doussan, Demeurant à Paris, entre les Mains de Louis Sheppers Son Agent à la Louisiane.” Also attached is a letter from Sheppers dated March 15, 1859, to Auguste Doussan in Grasse.

 

---Baton Rouge, February 4, 1860, “État des Valeurs Appartenant à Madame Louise Doussan à Paris Remises Ce Jour à Son Agent H.M. Favrot par Louis Sheppers Autrefois Son Agent à la Louisiane.”

 

---Baton Rouge, March 1, 1860, “Madame Louise Doussan Demeurant à Paris S/Compte Courant avec Louis Sheppers S/Agent à la Louisiane.”  Statements from March 1859 to February 1860.

 

---“Madame Louise Doussan en Compte Courant avec H.M. Favrot, Son Agent.”  Statements from February 1861 to October 1863.

 

---December 31, 1865, “Liste des Valeurs de Madame Louise Doussan entre les Mains de Son Agent, H.M. Favrot.”  Statements from March 1858 with projections to January 1867.

 

---December 31, 1865, “Madame Louise Doussan en Compte Courant avec Son Agent, H.M. Favrot.” Statements from October 1863 to December 1865.

 

---December 31, 1866, “Madame Louise Doussan en Compte Courant avec H.M. Favrot, Son Agent.” Statements from January 1866 to December 1866.

 

---December 31, 1866, “Valeurs de Dame Louise Doussan entre les Mains de H.M. Favrot.”

 

---December 31, 1867, “Madame Louise Doussan en Compte avec Son Agent H.M. Favrot.” Statements from January 1867 to December 1867.

 

---December 31, 1868, “Liste des Valeurs de Madame Louise Doussan.”

 

---December 31, 1869, “Madame Louise Doussan en Compte Courant avec H.M. Favrot, Son Agent.” Statements from January 1868 to December 1868.

 

---Baton Rouge, December 31, 1869, “Madame Louise Doussan en Compte avec H.M. Favrot, Son Agent.”

 

---Baton Rouge, February 7, 1870, “Liste des Valeurs de Dame Louise Doussan entre les Mains de H.M. Favrot.”

 

---Baton Rouge, February 7, 1870, “Liste des Valeurs de Dame Louise Doussan entre les Mains de M. Favrot.” 

 

---December 31, 1870, “Liste des Valeurs de Dame Louise Doussan entre les Mains de H.M. Favrot, Agent, le 31 Dec. 1870.”

 

---May 21, 1871, “Madame Louise Doussan en Compte avec H.M. Favrot, Son Agent.” Statements from January 1870 with projections to March 1872.  Attached is a letter dated May 21, 1871, from H.M. Favrot in Baton Rouge to “Ma Chère Cousine,” in which the writer mentions marriage of Julie Duralde to Paul Gourrier.

 

---December 31, 1871, “Madame Louise Doussan Son Compte avec H.M. Favrot, Son Agent.”  Statements from January 1871 to December 1871.

 

---December 31, 1872, “Liste des Valeurs de Dame Louise Doussan entre les Mains de H.M. Favrot, Agent, le 31 Dec. 1872” and “Madame Louise Doussan en Compte avec H.M. Favrot, Son Agent.”  Statements from January 1872 with projections to March 1873.

 

 

 

Appendix B Names Appearing in Correspondence (Series I) and Financial Papers (Series II)

 

Abat, Léonce (II)
 Aillet, Pierre (I-II)
 Aucoin, John C. (II)
 Augier Family (I)
 Babin Family (I-II)
 Bahr, Fred (II)
 Baker, John D. (II)
 Bareno, L. (II)
 Barnett Family (II)
 Barrow Family (II)
 Beal, Joshua (II)
  Beauregard Family (I-II)
 Berceon, Parisian Notary (I)
 Bernard Family (I-II)
 Bertrand Family (I-II)
 Bessy, Cécile (II)
 Bienville, Julien (I)
 Bird, T.J. (II)
 Black, Sam A. (II)
 Blanchard Family (I-II)
 Blanchard, Zéphirin (I-II)
 Blount, Wiley (II)
 Bohl, Adam (II)
 Bolsenur Family (II)
 Bonnecaze Family (I-II)
 Bowen, Catherine M. (II)
 Braccini Family (II)
 Bradford Family (II)
 Brooks, E.M. (II)
 Brown, J.W. (II)
 Brunot Family (I-II)
 Buckley, Daniel (II)
 Buckner, George W. (II)
 Buckner, Dr. Thomas (II)
 Burke (Burks), J. (II)
 Burns, Edward (II)
 Byrne, Thomas (II)
 Cadillian Family (I-II)
 Cahuzac Family (II)
 Cain, D.P. (II)
 Canton, Oliver (II)
 Capoulade Family (II)
 Cavelier Family (I)
 Chanoue, Charles (I)
 Chapman, J.W. (II)
 Charotte, J.C. (II)
 Chopin Family (I-II)
 Clément, F. (II)
 Clute Family (II)
 Corder, L. (I-II)
 Cousinard Family (II)
 Daigle, Louis (I)
 Daigre, Denis (II)
 Demouy (Dumouy) Family (II)
 Doiron, Jean (I-II)
 Dubroca Family (I-II)
 Dubuy, W. (I)
 Duggan Family (II)
 Duplantier Family (I-II)
 Duralde Family (I-II)
 Enders Family (II)
 Evans, William (II)
 Favrot Family (I-II)
 Faymoreau Family (I)
 Ferrier Family (I)
 Finley Family (II)
 Forêt, Dorville (II)
 Fourniel, Louis (II)
 Fousse, J. (II)
 François, Louis (II)
 Gardère, François (I-II)
 Gauthier Family (I-II)
 Gelmon Family (II)
 Généris, Abat (II)
 Godeau Family (II)
 Gorlinski Family (II)
 Gourrier, Paul (II)
 Grand Pré, (De) Family (I)
 Grieve (Greves), S. (II)
 Grover Family (I-II)
 Guédry, L. (II)
 Guinand Family (II)
 Guzman (Gusman), G. (I-II)
 Hackett Family (II)
 Hart Family (II)
 Hébert Family (I-II)
 Hereford Family (II)
 Hernandez, J. D. (II)
 Heroman, George (II)
 Hiriart Family (I-II)
 Holt Family (II)
 Huilier (Huillier), Parisian Notary (I-II)
 Hutchinson Family (II)
 Jeannet Quertier and Company, New Orleans (II)
 Johnston, Theodore (II)
 Kleinpeter, George (II)
 Labauve Family (I-II)
 Lafiton Family (I-II)
 Lafitte, Dufilho and Company (II)
 Lafon Family (II)
 Landry Family (I-II)
 Lange, Molière (II)
 Lanoue Family (II)
 Lapeyre Family (II)
 Larguier Family (II)
 Laurent Family (I)
 Lauzin Family (II)
 LeBlanc Family (I-II)
 LeBlanc, Villeneuve (I-II)
 Ledoux, A. (II)
 Lee, J.P. (II)
 Lefever, J.J. (II)
 Leray (Lerai) Family (II)
 Longuépée, Simon (II)
 Lopez, Rosalie (II)
 Lyons, Mary E. (II)
 MacCalop, James (I-II)
 McCornack (McCornick), Sydonie (II)
 McCutcheon, J.M. (II)
 McGrath, John (II)
 MacHatton Family (II)
McHugh, Philip (II)
 McKittrick, E. (II)
 McVey, James (II)
 Magruder, W.H.G. (II)
 Manadé Family (II)
 Matta Family (II)
 Ménard Family (I-II)
 Merle Family (I-II)
 Minouflet, A. (II)
 Moffitt, N.C. (II)
 Monget Family (II)
 Montan Family (II)
 Moreno Family (II)
 Morgan, Ben (II)
 Musselman, J.W. (II)
 Nephler, Joseph (II)
 Nolan Family (I-II)
 O’Connor Family (II)
 Parent, Joseph (I-II)
 Patin Family (I-II)
 Patrick Family (I-II)
 Peralta, H. (II)
 Perillat, F. (II)
 Perrin Family (I-II)
 Pétion Family (I)
 Peyronnin, B. (II)
 Phillips Family (II)
 Pike Family (II)
 Piper Family (II)
 Pipes, Charles (II)
 Pitot, A. (II)
 Pope, Martha (II)
 Poutz, P. (I)
 Prendergrass (Prendergast) Family (II)
 Puckett Family (II)
 Rauhman Family (I-II)
 Rhodes, James S. (II)
 Rhodus, S. (II)
 Ricard Family (I-II)
 Rinehart Family (II)
 Robertson Family (II)
 Roux Family (I)
 Séguin, François (I-II)
 Schaller (Shallor), Jacob (II)
 Shea, William (II)
 Sherburne, H.W. (II)
 Skolfield, L.A. (II)
 Smith, Martha (II)
 Soniat Family (I-II)
 Stevens Family (II)
 Tardif, J. Baptiste (I-II)
 Taylor, Isaac S. (II)
 Thériot, Ambroise (II)
 Thibodeaux, P.A. (II)
 Thompson, William (I-II)
 Tomlinson Family (II)
 Traber, Jean (I)
 Tullier, Jean (I-II)
 Tunnard Family (II)
 Verbois Family (I-II)
 Vialet Family (II)
 Vignaud Family (II)
 Waddill Family (II)
 White, G. B. (II)
 Williams Family (I-II)
 Wolfe Family (II).