Harry Pollard Gamble, Sr. Papers

(Mss. 4054) Inventory Compiled by Andrea Ellis Weddle Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections Special Collections, Hill Memorial Library Louisiana State University Libraries Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University 2009

CONTENTS OF INVENTORY

SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................ 3
BIOGRAPHICAL/HISTORICAL NOTE .......................................................................... 4
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE ....................................................................................... 5
LIST OF SUB-GROUPS, SERIES, AND SUBSERIES .................................................... 6
SERIES DESCRIPTIONS .................................................................................................. 7
INDEX TERMS ................................................................................................................ 16
CONTAINER LIST .......................................................................................................... 18

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SUMMARY

Size

2.5 linear feet

Geographic Locations

Louisiana, Mississippi

Inclusive Dates

1875-1987, undated

Bulk Dates

1954-1972

Languages

English

Summary

Public affairs and personal correspondence, printed items, and written materials related to Harry Pollard Gamble of New Orleans, La. Materials primarily relate to conservation of natural resources and the fight to uphold segregation in Louisiana.

Access Restrictions

No restrictions.

Reproduction Note

Copying is permitted.

Copyright

Physical rights and copyright are retained by the LSU Libraries

Related Collections

None.

Citation

Harry Pollard Gamble, Sr. Papers, Mss. 4054, Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge, La.

Stack Location(s)

40:

BIOGRAPHICAL/HISTORICAL NOTE

Harry Pollard Gamble was born October 17, 1876, in St. Maurice, Louisiana, to parents Elijah Johnson Gamble and Anna K. Harrison. From 1892-1896, he attended Louisiana State University, playing on the 1894 and 1895 football teams. In 1898, Gamble volunteered to join the Spanish-American War, serving in Cuba as Regimental Adjutant of the 2nd US Volunteer Infantry known as “Hood‟s Invincibles.” He mustered out at Camp Meade, Pennsylvania, in 1899 after being denied a commission in the regular army. Upon returning to Louisiana, he entered Tulane University to study law. In 1903, Gamble was admitted to the Louisiana Bar and opened his first practice in Winnfield. His second practice was later opened in New Orleans in 1912. Gamble served in the Louisiana State Legislature in 1904 and again in 1906 as a representative from Winn Parish. In 1912, he was appointed assistant attorney general under future governor Ruffin G. Pleasant. Gamble served as political manager for Governors Henry Fuqua, John Parker, and Oramel Simpson, as well as legal advisor to the state legislature for many years. During Gamble‟s early political career, he was acquainted with another young Louisiana politician, Huey P. Long. Gamble was an early critic of Long‟s policies and would later become an active figure in the anti-Long faction. He cited the election of Governor Long as the downfall of his political career. After Long‟s inauguration in 1928, Gamble was removed from his position as inheritance tax collector, only to be replaced by Huey‟s brother, Earl Long. He briefly reentered politics after Huey Long‟s assassination in 1935, only to retire again after Earl Long‟s election in 1944. In 1908, Gamble was appointed secretary of the Louisiana Conservation Commission. He accompanied Governor Jared Y. Sanders to the 1909 Joint Conservation Conference in Washington, D.C. Upon returning to Louisiana, Gamble authored some of the earliest conservation laws in the state, including the severance tax amendment to the Constitution of 1898. During the oil and gas shortages of World War II, pipelines were constructed across Louisiana from Texas to supply the east coast with fuel. Due to his previous conservation work, Gamble was called upon by concerned officials for guidance. After the 1954 Supreme Court ruling on Brown vs. The Board of Education, Gamble devoted his efforts to the fight to uphold segregation and preserve state‟s rights. He founded the American Society for the Preservation of State Government and Racial Integrity in 1955. This organization, with Gamble as its president, distributed materials and letters condemning the promotion of racial unity in the South and the integration of the public schools throughout the 1950s. Gamble continued to distribute materials privately from his home and remained active in the anti-desegregation fight until 1969. Gamble married Edna Brian (1876-1970) in Natchitoches Parish on March 20, 1899. They had six children: Elijah Johnson (1900-1903), Maude Elsie (1902-1967), Harry Pollard, Jr. (1904-1995), Dorothy Stone (1906-1996), Edna Brian (1908-1988), and Cameron Brian (1915-1996). Harry Gamble died in New Orleans, Louisiana, on October 28, 1972.

SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE

The Harry Pollard Gamble Papers consist of correspondence, printed items, graphic materials, written works, and research files chronicling Gamble‟s personal and public affairs life. The public affairs materials relate to his support of segregation, states‟ rights, the conservation of Louisiana‟s natural resources, and other political issues of the twentieth century. While Gamble had an active political career during the first part of the century, the majority of his public affairs correspondence is from the period after he retired from politics. Correspondence contains letters to and from elected officials and supporters of Gamble‟s causes. Printed items consist of circulars, flyers, and pamphlets distributed privately by Gamble and materials he received from other individuals active in the political scene. Additional correspondence and print materials relate to his creation and operation of The American Society for the Preservation of State Government and Racial Integrity, along with administrative files for the organization. Gamble‟s personal papers primarily consist of the correspondence and research files related to his written materials. His personal writings include several completed and partial works of history and historical fiction, none of which were ever published. Additional correspondence pertains to family and business matters. Other materials include newspaper clippings, genealogy research, carpentry sketches, photographs, and readings lists.

LIST OF SUB-GROUPS, SERIES, AND SUBSERIES

Subgroup 1. Public Affairs Papers, 1875, 1911-1971, undated Series I. Correspondence, 1927-1971, undated Subseries 1. Conservation, 1942-1971 Subseries 2. Segregation and States‟ Rights, 1944-1967, undated Subseries 3. Miscellaneous Public Affairs, 1927-1970, undated Series II. The American Society for the Preservation of State Government and Racial Integrity Records, 1954-1962, undated Subseries 1. Correspondence, 1954-1962, undated Subseries 2. Administrative Records, 1954-1955, undated Subseries 3. Printed Items, 1954-1956, undated Series III: Printed Items and Graphic Materials, 1875, 1911-1971, undated Subseries 1. Conservation, 1939-1946, 1971, undated Subseries 2. Segregation and States‟ Rights, 1875, 1911-1912, 1943-1965, undated Subseries 3. Miscellaneous Public Affairs, 1918, 1944-1957, undated Series IV: Writings and Speeches, 1918-1961, undated Subgroup 2. Personal Papers, 1894-1987, undated Series I. Correspondence, 1899, 1927-1972, undated Series II. Printed Items and Graphic Materials, 1894-1899, 1926, 1964-1972, undated Series III. Writings 1952-1971, undated Series IV. Miscellaneous Personal Papers, 1950-1987, undated

SERIES DESCRIPTIONS

Subgroup 1: Public Affairs, 1875, 1911-1971, undated Series I: Correspondence, 1927-1971, undated Subseries 1: Conservation, 1942-1971 This subseries consists of letters to and from senators, governors, and other prominent officials and activists regarding the conservation of Louisiana‟s natural resources during and after World War II. Specific topics include Gamble‟s involvement with the Conservation Commission, the construction of oil and gas pipelines in the state, and the potential siphoning of Louisiana‟s resources to support war needs. Letters also express the support their cause received from the Sam H. Jones administration and the lack of the support received from the Jimmie Davis administration. A letter from Senator John H. Overton (Nov. 26, 1943) includes a memorandum from the National Coal Association outlining the plans for the proposed pipeline across Louisiana. Subsequent letters discuss Gamble‟s fears that the oil pipelines will be converted to natural gas pipelines after the war. These fears are acknowledged in a letter to Louisiana Senator Allen J. Ellender, which includes a clipping from the Times-Picayune detailing Standard Oil‟s plans for conversion (July 7, 1944). A distribution packet (June 17, 1944) was compiled by Gamble and includes a selection of his correspondence with Senators John Overton and Ellender of Louisiana, Senator W. Lee O‟Daniel of Texas, and Governor Sam H. Jones regarding their opposition to the pipeline construction. In a letter to Honorable Joseph C. Hutcheson, United States Fifth Circuit Judge, Gamble includes a motion for leave to file brief amicus curiae representing himself and the citizens of Louisiana in Department of Conservation of Louisiana vs. the Federal Power Commission over the FPC‟s violation of the Natural Gas Act (March 15, 1945). Gamble‟s motion was returned without consideration as it was received after the deadline for submitting briefs. A series of letters beginning in 1952 and spanning until 1971 discuss Gamble‟s involvement in the development of Louisiana conservation laws and the revenues brought into the state by the severance tax. Attached to some correspondence are newspaper clippings and other printed items. Arranged chronologically. Subseries 2: Segregation and States’ Rights, 1944-1967, undated

This subseries includes Gamble‟s correspondence to and from public officials, prominent citizens, and like-minded activists related to segregation and states‟ rights. Beginning in 1944, letters discuss the Supreme Court Decision on Smith vs. Allwright and Gamble‟s early plans to organize the South against northern ideas of desegregation. After the Brown vs. the Board of Education ruling, Gamble‟s actions increased. He wrote to Louisiana senators in Washington, encouraging them to uphold the rights of the south

against northern oppression during what he called the “New Reconstruction.” Letters were also sent to the editors of southern newspapers, primarily the Times-Picayune, discouraging racial unity in the south. Also included are letters sent to the editors of northern newspapers attacking what Gamble believed was an inaccurate depiction of the South in northern press. In late 1957, he began urging for the resignation of Camille Gravel from the Democratic National Convention and his withdrawal from the Advisory Council on Civil Rights. Gravel served as the Chairman of the Louisiana Delegation at the Democratic National Convention of 1956. Gamble‟s correspondence expresses his anger over Gravel‟s voting records at the convention. Copies of Gravel‟s personal letters to other state committeemen state that he was attempting to promote unity within the Democratic Party when he voted to adopt resolutions upholding the party‟s views in regard to civil rights. Gamble‟s letters argue that Gravel failed to represent the views of the south (October-December 1957). A letter from C.W. McKay, Jr. includes a copy of the official statement on civil rights compiled by the Democratic National Convention. Of particular interest are letters sent by Gamble on January 30, 1958, that include a transcript of a debate in which he was a participant. Gamble was scheduled to debate Gravel, but Gravel was unable to attend due to inclement weather. Beginning in 1960, Gamble‟s letters attack religious officials in Louisiana for their promotion of racial integration. The “Monroe Letter” (April 17, 1962) was widely distributed throughout the state. The letter was an attack against former New Orleans journalist Bill Monroe, who was working for NBC news at the time, over an address given at Tulane University regarding his support for school integration. From 1964-1966, Gamble discusses the state of affairs in the Washington, D.C. public schools after integration occurred. An open letter (Aug 20, 1965) calls for the formation of “Restore Sanity in Washington” Clubs nationwide. In this letter, Gamble urges individuals to withhold their votes from the elected officials who promoted integration. Instructions for Gamble‟s mass distribution mailings are also included along with mailing lists for officials, businessmen, and organizational leaders obtained through newspapers and government publications. Additional segregation correspondence materials can be found in The American Society for the Preservation of State Government and Racial Integrity series. Attached to some correspondence are newspaper clippings and other printed items. Arranged chronologically. Subseries 3: Miscellaneous Public Affairs, 1927-1970, undated

This subseries documents Gamble‟s miscellaneous public affairs correspondence with elected officials and other activists. Topics include Gamble‟s early work as a political manager (1927), the Port of New Orleans and post-war jobs (May 1944), Gamble‟s

opinions on the Sam Jones and Jimmie Davis administrations (1945-1946), and the Korean War (July 1950). In a letter to the Times-Picayune dated August 20, 1969, Gamble describes the destruction caused by Hurricane Camille and outlines how the federal government should respond. In this letter, he urges the citizens of Louisiana to act by contacting their congressmen. In a letter from Arthur Crais, a graduate student at Tulane, Gamble is asked his opinions on former New Orleans mayor Robert S. Maestri (August 28, 1970). In a subsequent letter Gamble sends Crais a copy of his short political essay “The Story of Huey P. Kong” [sic]. The essay is included with the copy of the outgoing letter, but several pages are missing. Attached to some correspondence are newspaper clippings and other printed items. Arranged chronologically. Series II: The American Society for the Preservation of State Government and Racial Integrity Records, 1954-1962, undated Subseries 1: Correspondence, 1954-1962, undated The correspondence sent by Harry Gamble as President of The American Society for the Preservation of State Government and Racial Integrity consists of letters leading up to the society‟s creation and the correspondence sent while the society was active. Copies of early correspondence sent to prominent citizens of Louisiana, elected officials, and organizational heads request their membership and financial support (1954). Also included are many responses to Gamble‟s requests. Subsequent letters to officials in other states urge for the creation of ASPSGRI chapters in other localities. Correspondence sent to leaders of similar organizations discusses administrative and operational aspects of running such an organization (1954-1955). Of particular interest is a letter to the Joint Legislative Committee on Segregation which outlines the organization‟s lines of defense against the Supreme Court (Oct 22, 1954). Another segment of this subseries consists of letters sent by Gamble on behalf of the ASPSGRI to major newspapers, television studios, and magazine publishers condemning the promotion of racial unity in the media, specifically the depiction of interracial relationships (1955-1956). By late 1955, letters begin referencing the financial woes of the organization and Gamble‟s personal financial problems from subsidizing the organization‟s expenses. A letter to ASPSGRI Vice President J. Stewart Slack mentions their lack of funds and regrets the absence of monetary support from members (Sep 26th, 1955). Gamble later states that the ASPSGRI went inactive after the creation the New Orleans‟ Citizen‟s Council. He goes on to mention in later letters that he backed down from the fight, passing it on to younger generations (1958-1962). Attached to some correspondence are newspaper clippings and other printed items. Arranged chronologically.

Subseries 2: Administrative Records, 1954-1955, undated Administrative records related to the creation and operation of the American Society for the Preservation of State Government and Racial Integrity. Includes plans for the development of the organization and internal memoranda to members regarding the development process. Additional memos document the society‟s official purposes, mention general ideas for the hierarchical structure, discussions of potential officers, and the wording of membership letters (1954). Of interest is a memo from Gamble discussing his reasons for forming the organization and the specific occasions that sparked him to action (May 20, 1955). Research notes are included that list similar organizations in other states, including a hand-drawn map of Mississippi designating the counties with active citizen‟s councils or similar organizations (undated). Additional notes and research discuss the exchange of resources between the organizations. Drafts of bylaws, syllabi, and principles can also be found. Arranged by genre, and therein chronologically. Subseries 3: Printed Items and Graphic Materials, 1954-1956, undated This series contains printed items distributed by the American Society for the Preservation of State Government and Racial Integrity and related newspaper clippings. An example of the official letterhead of the organization, which lists the leaders and members at large, is also included. Pamphlets, flyers, and open letters distributed by the ASPSGRI were authored by Harry Gamble and distributed on a nationwide scale. The first printed item produced by the society was a pamphlet titled “Declaration of Principles” (1954). Gamble circulated this pamphlet along with membership letters to encourage individuals to join the cause. This pamphlet specifically outlines the aims of the organization. A second declaration, “Segregation of the White Race Must Be Preserved” was distributed later (1955). Also of interest is a postcard distributed eight months after the inception of the society requesting additional funds from members (1955). The ASPSGRI distributed propaganda material while it was active. A flyer sent to southern congregations and ministers titled “Race Amalgamation: Who is Steering Whom Where?” reproves a statement made by the Council of Churches regarding the lack of Biblical evidence for the condemnation of interracial marriages. A series of fliers first distributed in 1955, were meant to warn citizens of New Orleans, especially parents, of the progressive nature of university sociology departments. The first flier, titled “Sociology - Social „Science‟: Who is Pointing the Gun?,” includes a reprint of a 1955 Times-Picayune article headlining a panel discussion at Dillard University of sociologists on remedies to the racial problem. Another anti-sociology flyer, titled “Where the „Enlightened Sociological Department‟ Road Leads,” depicts an image of a white woman walking with black men on the University of Virginia Campus.

Graphic Materials include a political cartoon illustrated by ASPSGRI member R.M. Briley, depicting several aspects of the society‟s view on the segregation question (undated). Newspaper clippings consist of Gamble‟s letters to the editor written on behalf of the society and official statements made by Gamble (1954-1956). Arranged by title. Clippings arranged chronologically. Series III: Printed Items and Graphic Materials, 1875, 1911-1971, undated Subseries 1: Conservation, 1939-1946, 1971, undated This series consists of newspaper and magazine clippings and copies of federal and state government materials related to pipeline construction in Louisiana and the threat to natural resources. Several articles discuss Governor Sam Jones‟ stance against the oil pipelines (1943-1944). An article from the Times-Picayune by Editor George W. Healy, Jr. mentions that natural gas extracted from the Gulf of Mexico falls outside the boundaries of Louisiana and is not subject to state severance or sales taxes (1971). Additionally, there are several governmental records and publications used by Gamble to draw up the brief he submitted in 1945 regarding the Department of Conservation vs. the Federal Power Commission. Many contain handwritten edits and notes in the margins. Materials include: A Partial Reprint of the Report of the Louisiana Conservation Committee of 1910-1912, which was reprinted at Gamble‟s own expense to support his arguments (1946); a copy of the Federal Power Commission Natural Gas Act (1939); a report of members of the State Conservation Committee (undated); and the Petition for Review of an Order of the Federal Power Commission (LA Dept of Conservation vs. Federal Power Commission) (1945). A photograph is included of the State Legislative Committee on Conservation with members of the Conservation Commission (undated). Materials are arranged by genre, then title. Clippings are arranged chronologically. Subseries 2: Segregation and States’ Rights, 1875, 1911-1912, 1943-1965, undated

Clippings from newspapers, magazines, and other periodicals, including the Times-Picayune, Saturday Evening Post, and US News and World Report, regarding segregation and related topics. Magazine and newspaper clippings reflect a variety of opinions on the segregation matter, some with notes by Gamble. Additional topics include conflicts in the North caused by integration and historical information on racial matters, including Reconstruction and slavery. To prove that the New Orleans African American schools were successful prior to integration of the schools beginning in 1960, Gamble saved articles relating to the graduation ceremonies, top scholars, and scholarship recipients (1959). Of particular interest are articles from radical publications, such as Common Sense: American’s Newspaper Against Communism (September 1962). Articles authored

by Gamble, primarily letters to the editors, are also included in this series (1959-1964, undated). Government publications include a Congressional report documenting the condition of the South after Reconstruction (March 1875). Additional reports discuss the Bricker Amendment and Brown vs. the Board of Education (1954). The Official Plan of Operations of the Advisory Council of the Democratic National Convention was used by Gamble to prepare for his debate against Camille Gravel (1956). Although the American Society for the Preservation of State Government and Racial Integrity was inactive after 1957, Gamble continued to distribute materials privately from his home. These materials include: “Accidental Riots or Planned Anarchy” (1967); several open letters to the people of New Orleans regarding newspaper censorship in the Times-Picayune (1960, 1962); “A Non-Platonic Dialogue” against the legislators who supported Senate Bill 810 in an attempt to gain the African American vote (1959); and “The Supreme Court, The Supreme Lawbreaker” against the ruling on integration (1963). In addition to the materials distributed by Gamble, this subseries includes pamphlets, flyers, and circulars distributed by other organizations and individuals. Topics include statistics on crime rates, the success of African American schools, violence caused by integration in the North, and interracial relationships. Additional printed items include reprints of articles regarding segregation from scholarly journals and the official statement of the American Bar Association Special Committee on Civil Rights (1965). Materials are arranged by genre, then title. Clippings are arranged chronologically. Subseries 3: Miscellaneous Public Affairs, 1918, 1944-1957, undated This subseries consists of newspaper clippings, printed items distributed by Gamble, and additional printed materials relating to miscellaneous public affairs. Newspapers clippings include four letters to the editor from Harry Gamble, including two submitted under pseudonyms. One discusses the Louisiana Civil Service Law, submitted under the name “Experience” (undated), and the other rebukes the use of state pension funds to construct roads, submitted under the name “Fairplay (undated). The additional letters to the editor discuss the Jimmie Davis gubernatorial campaign (undated) and the United States‟ involvement in Korea (1953). Printed items distributed by Gamble include his essay on female suffrage, An Open Letter to U.S. Senator Ransdell Opposing the Federal Amendment for Woman Suffrage in which Gamble states his belief that granting the vote to women will be “productive of great evil to the South” (1918). Additional print materials in this series include a pamphlet documenting possible post-war policies for the Port of New Orleans (1945) and a copy of State of Louisiana Primary Election Law (1957). Of particular interest is a reprint of an article from Southwest Review by Jacob Morrison titled “Long Shadows over LA: Will it happen again?” (1944) and a New Orleans District Court certificate documenting Gamble‟s work as inheritance tax collector (1947).

Materials are arranged by genre, then title. Clippings are arranged chronologically. Series IV: Writings and Speeches, 1918-1961, undated This series includes the unpublished public affairs writings by Harry Gamble and unpublished short political essays by his acquaintances. Copies of Gamble‟s speeches are also included. An untitled historical piece on the United States Constitution discusses the role of the Constitution in Supreme Court cases, including civil rights cases. Gamble argues that elected officials neglect to uphold the Constitution in their decisions (1937). Many of Gamble‟s short political essays were left untitled and incomplete. Topics of interest include the laudability of newspaper journalists in the South, the Supreme Court ruling on integration, Camille Gravel and the Democratic Advisory Committee (including a draft indictment against Gravel), and a set of campaign utterances against Mayor Robert S. Maestri of New Orleans (all undated). Another series of short political essays do not provide an author‟s name. Of particular interest is a satirical application for show causes against Governor Sam Jones, the Louisiana State Legislature, and their supporters (undated). Essays related to segregation by Gamble‟s acquaintances Clarence Ives (1961) and Jessie W. Jenkins (undated) are included as well. Additionally, Gamble‟s personal research and notes on conservation and segregation are included, as well as lists of readings he consulted, summaries, and critiques. The speeches in this series include two addresses, Suffrage A Racial Question in the South: Address by Harry Gamble, Delivered Before the New Orleans Press Club, March 11th, 1918 and Address to the Legislature Convening May 9, 1932: The Strange Case of Louisiana and Huey P. Long. Additionally there are copies of two memorials given by Gamble for Hewitt Leonidas Bouanchaud to the Louisiana Bar Association (undated) and a memorial for former Governor Jared Young Sanders to the Louisiana Supreme Court (1944). Arranged in no distinguishable order. Subgroup 2. Personal Papers, 1894-1987, undated Series I. Correspondence, 1899, 1927-1972, undated This series primarily encompasses Gamble‟s correspondence with family and friends as well as the correspondence related to his research. Early correspondence is from Gamble‟s involvement in the Spanish-American War, specifically regarding his request for appointment in the regular army (1899). Many letters discuss the health of various family members and friends, including his brother, Robert Gamble (1949). Gamble reflects on his years at Louisiana State University, specifically the years he played on the LSU football team, in his correspondence with old friends (1968). Additional topics include Gamble‟s military pension, reflections on growing up in Natchitoches Parish, philosophical discussions with long time acquaintance Clarence Ives, and genealogical matters with distant relatives.

Beginning in the late 1960s, Gamble started a correspondence with the Prudhomme family of Oakland Plantation in Natchitoches Parish. They provided personal accounts, family stories passed down through generations, and general facts about the Cane River area for inclusion in Gamble‟s book The River That Was. He spent the final years of his life writing to publishers, including LSU Press (1969-1971). In a letter from Cotton Press, Gamble‟s work was accepted for publication, but he never returned the required forms (1971). This series also includes correspondence related to his duties as board member for Guaranty Bank and Finance Company and Guaranty Income Life Insurance Company. Letters include discussions on the organization of the board after the death of the company‟s founder and discussions with similar companies related to operational approaches. The World War II correspondence of Cameron Brian Gamble discuses his enlistment on September 1940 in the Marine Corps under the assumed name C.C. Cameron and conveys the family‟s displeasure over the matter. He was later discharged in 1942. Attached to some correspondence are newspaper clippings and other print items. Arranged chronologically. Series II. Printed Items and Graphic Materials, 1894-1899, 1926, 1964-1972, undated This series includes newspaper clippings related to the Gamble family. An article published in the Times-Picayune tells the story of four generations of Gamble football players, from Harry Gamble, Sr. to his great-grandson Harry Gamble IV (1971). A photograph of the four generations is also included in this series. Obituaries from the Times-Picayune for Edna Brian Gamble (1970) and Harry Pollard Gamble (1972) are included. Additional clippings relate to LSU class reunions, civic organizations, and marriages of family friends. Additional newspaper and magazine clippings from Harry Gamble‟s private research include a print depicting the Battle of Canal Street (undated) and articles covering Louisiana in the Civil War. Other research items document life on the Cane River during the Red River Campaign Photographs portray Gamble family and friends. Two photographs depict the LSU football team of 1894. An 1899 photograph shows Gamble with two other soldiers stationed in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. Other photographs depict unknown individuals. Series III. Writings, 1952-1971, undated

This series consists of Harry Gamble‟s private research and writings. His largest work, The River That Was (1971), is a fictional account of the Red River Campaign. His research and notes are also included. American Revolution: The Story of the Colonies up to Concord (1960) is an unfinished piece on the struggle for American independence and the history of the colonies. Draft copies of portions of the work are available, along with plans for a corresponding piece on the French Revolution. Gamble‟s most ambitious work, titled The Heavens, The Earth, and Mankind (1952-1967) is also incomplete with only a few chapters and an outline included. His notes pertaining to this work are including and detail the scope of the book, from astronomy to the solar system and ending with a complete history of mankind. Miscellaneous research on United States History and summaries of articles and historical documents are also located in this series. Series IV. Miscellaneous Personal Papers, 1950-1987, undated This series includes Gamble‟s genealogical research, memorabilia, carpentry sketches, and reading lists. Included in the genealogical materials is a family history by Cameron Brian Gamble, The Gamble Family (1987). Memorabilia consists of invitations and membership cards. Also included are lists of surviving LSU alumni who graduated before 1900 and Spanish-American War Veterans in the New Orleans area (both undated).

INDEX TERMS

Materials relating to these people, places, and things can be found in the series indicated, as represented by their numbers.

Terms African Americans--Suffrage. American Society for the Preservation of State Government and Racial Integrity. Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka. Cane River (La.)--History. Carpentry. Civil rights--Societies, etc.

Conservation of natural resources--Louisiana.

Davis, Jimmie, 1899-2000 Democratic National Convention (1956 : Chicago, Ill.) Ellender, Allen Joseph, 1890-1972 Gamble family. Gamble, Cameron Brian, 1915-1996. Gamble, Edna Brian, 1876-1970. Gamble, Harry Pollard, 1876-1972. Genealogy. Hurricane Camille, 1969. Insurance companies--Louisiana. Ives, Clarence Albert, 1869-1966. Jenkins, Jessie Welch. Jones, Sam Houston, 1897-1978. Long, Huey Pierce, 1893-1935. Long, Russell B. Louisiana Conservation Commission. Louisiana--Politics and government--20th century. LSU Tigers (Football team). Maestri, Robert S. (Robert Sidney), 1899-1974. Middleton, Troy Houston, 1889-1976. Natchitoches Parish (La.) New Orleans (La.) Newspapers--Censorship. Oakland Plantation (La.) Overton, John Holmes, 1875-1948 Piney Woods Country Life School, Braxton, Miss. Pipelines--Louisiana. Political activists--United States--Correspondence. Prudhomme, J. Alphonse, 1896-1991. Rainach, William M.

Series 1.I.2, 1.II.1, III.2 1.II 1.I.2, 1.II, 1.III.2 2.I, 2.II, 2.III 2.IV 1.I.2, 1.II, 1.III.2, 1.IV 1.I.1, 1.III.1, 1.IV 1.I.1, 1.I.3, 1.III.3 1.1.2, 1.III.2, 1.IV 1.I.1 2 2.I, 2.II, 2.IV 2.I, 2.II, 2.IV All series 2.IV 1.I.3 2.I 1.I.2, 1.II, I.IV, 2.I I.I.2, 1.III.2 1.I.1, 1.I.3, 1.III.1, 1.IV 1.I.3, 1.III.3, 1.IV 1.I.2, I.II.1 1.I.1, I.III.1, I.IV 1 2.I, 2.II 1.I.3, I.IV 1.II.1 1.I.1, 2 All series 1.I.2, 1.III.2, I.IV 2.I, 2.III 1.I.1, 1.III.1, IV 1.III.2, 2.1 1.I.1, 1.III.1, 1.IV 1.I 2.1 1.I.1, 1.II

Red River Expedition, 1864--History--Fiction. School integration--United States. Severance tax--Louisiana. Spanish-American War, 1898--Military personnel--Cuba. States‟ rights (American politics). United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783. White Citizens councils. Women--Suffrage--United States. World War, 1939-1945--Fuel supplies--United States.

2.I, 2.III

1.I.2, 1.II, 1.III.2, 1.IV

1.I.1, 1.III.1, 1.IV

2.I, 2.II

1.I.2, 1.II, 1.III.2, 2.IV

1.III

1.1.2, 1.II.1, 1.II.3, 1.III.2

1.III.3

1.I.1, 1.III.1, 1.IV

CONTAINER LIST

Stack Location

Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

Subgroup 1. Public Affairs, 1875, 1911-1971, undated

Series I. Correspondence, 1927-1971, undated

Subseries 1. Conservation, 1942-1971

40:

1

1-2

(1942-1971)

Subseries 2. Segregation and States’ Rights, 1944- 1967, undated

3-10

(1944-1969, undated)

11

Instructions for Circulated Letters (1954-1967, undated)

12-13a

Mailing Lists, Clippings (1954-1966, undated)

Subseries 3. Miscellaneous Public Affairs, 1927- 1970, undated

13b

(1927-1970, undated)

Series II. The American Society for the Preservation of State Government and Racial Integrity, 1954-1962, undated

Subseries 1. Correspondence, 1954-1962, undated

14-16

(1954-1962, undated)

Subseries 2. Administrative Records, 1954-1955, undated

17

Internal Memoranda (1954-1955, undated)

18

Notes and Research (1954, undated)

19

Bylaws and Principles (1954)

Subseries 3. Printed Items and Graphic Material, 1954-1956, undated

20

Circulars, Pamphlets (1954-1955, undated) Political Cartoon (undated)

21

Newspaper Clippings (1954-1956)

Stack Location

Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

40:

1

Series III. Printed Items and Graphic Materials, 1875, 1911-1971, undated

Subseries 1. Conservation, 1939-1946, 1971, undated

22

Clippings (1943-1944, 1971, undated)

23

State and Federal Government Records (1939-1946, undated)

40:

3

1

Photograph of the State Legislative Committee on Conservation with members of the Conservation Commission (undated)

Subseries 2. Segregation and States’ Rights, 1875, 1911-1912, 1943-1965, undated

40:

1

24-27

Newspaper Clippings (1943-1965, undated)

28

Newspaper Clippings articles by Harry Gamble (1959-1964, undated)

29-31

Government Records (1875, 1954-1956, 1957)

32

Materials distributed privately by Harry Gamble: Accidental Riots or Planned Anarchy? (1967); Newspaper Censorship: An Open Letter to the People of New Orleans (1960); A Non-Platonic Dialogue (1959); The Supreme Court, The Supreme Lawbreaker (1963); additional items regarding newspaper censorship (1962)

33

Circulars, Flyers and Newsletters (1954-1965, undated)

34-35

Pamphlets (1911-1912, 1945-1960)

36

Reprints, statement of the American Bar Association Special Committee on Civil Rights (1965)

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Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

Subseries 3. Miscellaneous Public Affairs, 1918, 1944-1957, undated

40:

2

1

Clippings Newspaper Articles by Harry Gamble (1953, undated)

2

Materials distributed privately by Harry Gamble: An Open Letter to U.S. Senator Ransdell Opposing the Federal Amendment for Woman Suffrage (1918)

3

“Long shadows over Louisiana,” reprint from the Southern Review (1944); Port of New Orleans: A Study of its Problems (1945);; State of Louisiana Primary Election Law (1957)

4

New Orleans District Court certificate documenting Gamble‟s work as Inheritance Collector (1947)

Series IV. Writings and Speeches, 1918-1961, undated

5

Harry Gamble, untitled piece on the U.S. Constitution (1937)

6

Harry Gamble, short political essays: Can the People Beat the Jobholders (undated); A Certain Type, By No Means Admirable, Newspaper Man, draft (undated); Phony Talk (undated); Supreme Law of the Land, draft (undated)

7

Harry Gamble, untitled political essays - subjects include: Gravel and the Democratic Advisory Committee, campaign utterances against Mayor Robert Maestri, and the Supreme Court Ruling on Integration (undated)

8

Clarence Albert Ives [1869-1966], Decline of the American System, (1961); Jessie Welch Jenkins, Illegality and Unconstitutionality of the 14th and 15th Amendments, (undated); No author listed for the following political essays: The Supreme Court Means and Ends (undated); Are We Pro American? (undated); a satirical application for show causes and

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Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

injunctions against Governor Sam Jones and the legislature, (undated)

40:

9

Speeches - Federal Suffrage A Racial Question in the South: Address by Harry Gamble, Delivered Before the New Orleans Press Club, March 11th, 1918 (1918); Harry Gamble, Address to the Legislature Convening May 9, 1932: The Strange Case of Louisiana and Huey P. Long (1932); Memorial for Hewitt Leonidas Bouanchaud to the Louisiana Bar Association (undated); Memorial for Jared Young Sanders to the Louisiana Supreme Court (1944)

10

Notes and Research conservation, (undated)

11

Notes and Research segregation and states‟ rights (1954-1967, undated)

Subgroup 2. Personal Papers, 1894-1987, undated

Series I. Correspondence, 1899, 1927-1972, undated

40:

2

12-15

(1899, 1927, 1938-1972, undated)

16

Business Affairs - Guaranty Bond and Finance Company, Guaranty Income Life Insurance Company (1929-1972)

17

Cameron Brian Gamble (1940-1945)

18

Address book (undated)

Series II. Printed Items and Graphic Materials, 1894-1899, 1926, 1964-1972, undated

19

Clippings (1898, 1926, 1964-1972, undated)

40:

2

20

Miscellaneous (undated)

40:

3

2-5

Photographs (1894, 1899, 1971, undated)

Series III. Writings, 1952-1971, undated

40:

2

21-26

Harry Gamble, The River That Was (1971); research notes (1967-1971)

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Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

40:

27

Harry Gamble, American Revolution: The Story of the Colonies up to Concord, undated, incomplete draft (1960); outline for a corresponding piece on the French Revolution (1960)

28

Harry Gamble, The Heavens, The Earth, and Mankind, incomplete draft (1952-1967)

29

Miscellaneous Research and Notes (1957-1969, undated)

Series IV. Miscellaneous Personal Papers, 1950-1987, undated

30

Genealogy copies of official records and personal research (1950-1971)

31

Genealogy Cameron Brian Gamble, The Gamble Family (1987)

32

Invitations, certificates (1955-1972, undated)

33

Lists of early LSU graduates and Spanish-American War Veterans, (undated)

34-36

Carpentry sketches, carpentry journal, (1950-1952)

37

Reading lists (1951-1958, undated)

40:

4

Reading lists scrolls (undated)