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BACON (EDMUND) LETTERS

(Mss. 2178)

Inventory
Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections Special Collections, Hill Memorial Library Louisiana State University Libraries
Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University
Reformatted 2003
Revised 2010


CONTENTS OF INVENTORY

SUMMARY 3

BIOGRAPHICAL/HISTORICAL NOTE 4

SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE 4

CROSS REFERENCES 5

CONTAINER LIST 7


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SUMMARY


Size. 14 items


Geographic locations.

Savannah, Ga.; Augusta, Ga.; Edgefield, S.C.; Loftus Heights, Miss.


Inclusive dates. 1802-1820


Bulk dates. 1807-1820


Language. English


Summary. Letters of Edmund Bacon, Georgia lawyer and cotton planter, to his sister Agnes and her husband, Col. Joseph Pannill of Mississippi. The letters pertain to legal, agricultural, and educational matters in Georgia, South Carolina, and Mississippi. One letter to Agnes Pannill from her son, Alexander.


Organization. Chronological


Restrictions on access.

If microfilm is available, photocopies must be made from microfilm.


Related collections.

Richard H. Smith and Family Papers, Mss. 2179


Copyright. Copyright of the original materials is retained by descendants of the creators in accordance with U.S. copyright law.


Citation. Bacon (Edmund) Letters, Mss. 2178, Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge, La.


Stack location(s). B:16


BIOGRAPHICAL/HISTORICAL NOTE


Edmund Bacon, lawyer and cotton planter, was born in Virginia. His early education took place in Augusta, Georgia, followed by law school in Litchfield, Connecticut. He settled in Savannah and amassed a fortune at the bar by the age of 33. Due to ill health, Bacon moved to Edgefield, South Carolina, where the climate was more healthful. He soon became a leading practitioner in that area.


SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE


Letters of Edmund Bacon, lawyer and cotton planter of Savannah and Augusta, Georgia, and Edgefield, South Carolina, to his sister, Agnes, and her husband, Colonel Joseph Pannill, of Loftus Heights, Wilkinson County, Mississippi. Some letters pertain to legal and business matters in Georgia and South Carolina, and to agricultural matters in those states and southwest Mississippi, in particular, the introduction by Bacon of improved strains of cotton received from Mississippi. Others pertain to education in Georgia and South Carolina, and travel from South Carolina to Mississippi. Bacon also mentions the improvement of relations with Native Americans in the region (July 19, 1812) and a severe outbreak of yellow fever in South Carolina (January 1, 1818). Of note is a letter in which Bacon talks of the purchase of plantation land from General Charles C. Pinckney on the Savannah River near Augusta and Edgefield as well as the purchase of 25 slaves (April 24, 1807).


CROSS REFERENCES

Subject

Date

Description of relevant documents

Cotton--Research--South Carolina. 1807, 1815 Experiment to develop improved strain of cotton with seed from Natchez area, Dec. 3, 1807; superior cotton crop brings higher price, lacks rot, and bears out theory of rot prevention, Dec. 24, 1815
Cotton farmers--Georgia. 1802-1820 Family letters comment on change of residence from Savannah, development of cotton plantation, legal practice, educational facilities available, and business matters.
Cotton farmers--South Carolina-- Edgefield. 1807-1820 Family letters comment on location and development of plantation, legal practice, educational facilities available, and business matters.
Creek Indians--Mississippi. 1812, 1820 Regret recent murders committed, and disposed for peace; travel to Mississippi dependent upon disposition of Indians, July 19, 1812; travel difficulties lessened by removal of difficulties with Indians.
Hot springs--Health aspects-- Georgia--Warm Springs. Dec. 3, 1807, July 15, 1814 Visits to Warm Springs for improvement of health of self and members of family.
Justices of the peace--Mississippi-- Wilkinson County. 1802-1820 Family letters to Joseph Pannill and his wife, Agnes, concern education, travel, [yellow fever] scourge, business matters, and development of improved strains of cotton from Natchez area.
Lawyers--Georgia. 1802-1820 Family letters comment on change of residence from Savannah, development of cotton plantation, legal practice, educational facilities available, and business matters.
Lawyers--South Carolina. 1802-1820 Family letters relate local news and comment on legal, business and agricultural matters.
Pannill, Alexander--Travel--Southern States. 1812, 1820 Return home of Alexander Pannill dependent upon disposition of Indians and company offered, July 19, 1812; medical doctors recommend travel hardships for body tone, May 14, 1813; travel difficulties lessoned by removal of difficulties with Indians and improved roads, Aug. 8, 1820.
Pannill, Joseph--Family. 1802-1820 13 family letters from Bacon concern legal, business, agricultural, and educational matters, and travel difficulties between South Carolina and Wilkinson County, Miss.
Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth, 1746- 1825. Apr. 24, 1807 Plantation land on Savannah River near Augusta, Georgia and Edgefield, South Carolina purchased by Bacon from Pinckney.
Plantation owners--South Carolina. 1807-1820 Purchase of slaves and land; development of improved cotton strain from strain near Natchez; attributes superior cotton to his theory of rot prevention.
>United States--Economic conditions. May 14, 1813 Failure to command money on reasonable or fair terms blamed on “dreadful catastrophe” in this country
Wilkinson, James, 1757-1825. Aug. 10, 1802 Description of Wilkinson as man who appears to have useful information and rich in anecdote.
Yellow fever--Georgia. 1818 Scourge in Augusta as serious as in Natchez; daily burials of 6 or 7.
Young men--Education--Georgia. 1811-1813, 1816 4 letters regarding education of Alexander Pannill away from home: Sept. 1, 1811 (2 letters), July 19, 1812, and May 14, 1813. Superiority of nearby academy and educational accomplishments of children. Sept. 4, 1816 – South Carolina
Young men--Education--South Carolina. 1811-1813, 1816 4 letters regarding education of Alexander Pannill away from home: Sept. 1, 1811 (2 letters), July 19, 1812, and May 14, 1813. Superiority of nearby academy and educational accomplishments of children. Sept. 4, 1816 – South Carolina


CONTAINER LIST


Stack
Location
Box
Folder(s)
Contents (with dates)
B:16 1 1-2 1802-1820