EDWARD J. GAY AND FAMILY PAPERS

(Mss. 1295)

Inventory

Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections

Special Collections, Hill Memorial Library

Louisiana State University Libraries

Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University

Reformatted 2007-2008

By John Hansen and Caroline Richard

CONTENTS OF INVENTORY

SUMMARY .................................................................................................................................... 3
BIOGRAPHICAL/HISTORICAL NOTE ...................................................................................... 4
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE ................................................................................................... 6
LIST OF SERIES ............................................................................................................................ 7
COLLECTION DESCRIPTION .................................................................................................... 8
Series I., Correspondence and Other Papers, 1797-1938, undated ................................................. 8
Series II., Printed Items, 1837-1911, undated ............................................................................... 58
Series III., Photographs, 1874-1901, undated. .............................................................................. 59
Series IV. Manuscript Volumes, 1825-1919, undated. ................................................................ 60
CONTAINER LIST ...................................................................................................................... 70

Use of manuscript materials. If you wish to examine items in the manuscript group, please fill out a call slip specifying the materials you wish to see. Consult the Container List for location information needed on the call slip.

Photocopying. Should you wish to request photocopies, please consult a staff member. Do not remove items to be photocopied. The existing order and arrangement of unbound materials must be maintained. Reproductions must be made from surrogates (microfilm, digital scan, photocopy of original held by LSU Libraries), when available.

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Proper acknowledgement of LLMVC materials must be made in any resulting writing or publications. The correct form of citation for this manuscript group is given on the summary page. Copies of scholarly publications based on research in the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections are welcomed.

SUMMARY

Size.

62 linear feet (186 document cases); 165 manuscript volumes.

Geographic locations.

St. Louis, Missouri; Iberville Parish, Louisiana; Washington, D.C.

Inclusive dates.

1797-1938

Bulk dates.

1838-1910

Language.

English

Summary.

Personal, business and plantation papers of Edward J. Gay (1816-1889), merchant, planter, and United States Congressman , St. Louis, Missouri and Iberville Parish, and his wife, Lavinia Hynes Gay, consisting principally of letters, land records, maps, photographs, plats, bills, receipts, drafts, invoices, contracts, agreements, pay rolls, time sheets, etc. pertaining to family matters, business and plantation operations, and the settlement of their successions.

Organization.

Organized chronologically within broad series.

Restrictions on access.

If microfilm is available, photocopies must be made from microfilm.

Related collections.

Andrew H. Gay and Family Papers, Mss. 2542; Edward J. Gay III Congressional File, Mss. 1295; Gay-Butler-Plater Family Papers, Mss. 4872; Acadia Plantation Records, 4906.

Copyright.

Copyright of the original materials is retained by descendants of the creators in accordance with U.S. copyright law. Unpublished items whose creators have been deceased seventy or more years are in the public domain.

Citation.

Edward Gay and Family Papers, Mss. 1295, Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge, La.

Stack location(s).

Y:1-62 and Y:81, H:25-27, OS:G, Vault

BIOGRAPHICAL/HISTORICAL NOTE

Edward J. Gay was born to Sophia Mitchell Gay (1793-1869) and John Henderson Gay (1787-1878) in Liberty, Bedford County, Va. The family moved west to Illinois then settled in St. Louis, Mo., where they resided on Union Avenue. In 1834, Edward J. Gay graduated from Augusta College in Kentucky and entered the family mercantile business in St. Louis. He then joined the St. Louis factor firm Glasgow and Gay, which he later left to form his own wholesale grocery business, Edward J. Gay and Company. He operated that business until the outbreak of the Civil War.

Gay married Lavinia Hynes of Nashville in that city in 1840. The couple had six children: Andrew Hynes Gay (1841- 1914), Edward J. Gay, Jr. (1850-1878), John H. Gay (1853-1915), Sophia M. Gay [Crow] (1843- 1929), Mary Susan Gay [Butler] (1846-1882), and Anna Margaret Gay [Price] (1855-1939).

It was his marriage to Lavinia Hynes that brought Gay to Louisiana, for she was the daughter of Anne Erwin Hynes and Andrew Hynes, a Nashville merchant who acquired an interest in his father-in-law‟s plantation, Home, located in Iberville Parish near Plaquemine, in 1836. When Andrew Hynes died in 1849, he owned one of the largest sugar plantations in Iberville Parish and 223 slaves valued at $86,000. Gay, acting as administrator of the Hynes estate, took over the management of Home Plantation. About 1856, after having purchased the interests of the other, Gay built a new residence at Home and changed the name of the plantation to St. Louis. Around 1869, he also built Gay Villa on the outskirts of St. Louis, Missouri.

During the Civil War, Edward J. Gay and family remained for the most part at their Louisiana plantation, and he continued to engage in the purchase and sale of sugar and cotton. After the war, Gay expanded his financial interests through the purchase of a partnership in the William Edwards and Company, a New Orleans factor house, and the acquisition of additional plantations by sales and foreclosures of mortgages. By 1868, Edward J. Gay either owned or was financially interested in St. Louis, Olivia, Keep, Mount Magnolia, Greenfield, Kleinpeter, and Oaks plantations located in Iberville and West Baton Rouge Parishes. He continued to acquire holdings and interests until about 1880, and those plantations included Woodland, Landry-Toffier, Ridgefield, Theresa, Larimore, Greenwood, Pecan, Shady Grove, Acadia, Coulon, Mulberry Grove, Elvinia, Edgefield, Normandy, Dunboyne, and Kuneman Plantations located in Iberville, Pointe Coupee, and Lafourche Parishes.

Gay‟s sons and sons-in-law assisted him in the management of his properties and businesses. With the dissolution in 1868 of the firm William Edwards and Company, Edward J. Gay opened up a New Orleans commission firm, Edward J. Gay and Company, placing his son, Edward in business there with Samuel Cranwill as manager. Young Edward was affiliated with this firm until his death in 1878, from yellow fever. Between 1870 and 1872, Major Lawrence L. Butler, husband of Mary Sue Gay, apparently assisted his father-in-law in managing St. Louis Plantation. When Gay opened the commission firm of Edward J. Gay and Company in St. Louis, Butler became manager. In the early 1880s, Andrew Price, husband of Anna “Nannie” Margaret Gay, took over the management of Acadia Plantation near Thibodaux in Lafourche Parish, La., and moved there from New Orleans in 1882. Gay also had several raw sugar mills on his various plantations. He established a sugar refinery in New Orleans in 1883 and maintained residences and offices there, in Plaquemine, and in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1884, Edward J. Gay received the nomination of the Democratic Party of the Third District of Louisiana for Congress and defeated William Pitt Kellogg. He served as United States Representative until his death in 1889.

After the Civil War, Andrew H. Gay married his wartime sweetheart, Mary Dickinson (1845-1872) of Bayou Grosse Tete not far from Plaquemine. In 1876, he married Lodoiska Clement (1843-1933). The children of the first marriage were Anna Maria Gay, later married to Charles McClung of Knoxville;

Lavinia Gay, married to Allen Weaver of St. Louis; Mary Sue Gay, married to Albert Doolittle of Kansas City, and Andrew Gay, Jr., married to Irene Cannon. The sole child of the second marriage was Edward J. Gay, III (1878-1952), who married Gladys Fenner (1883-1970) of New Orleans. Edward J. Gay III served as Louisiana‟s United States Senator from 1917 to 1920, and fathered the generations of the Gays who now control St. Louis Plantation.

SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE

Personal and business papers of the Gay and related families consist of correspondence, land records, maps, photographs, land plats, bills, receipts, drafts, invoices, contracts and agreements, time sheets and pay rolls. These papers pertain to plantation economy, commerce, the sugar cane industry, slavery, St. Louis Plantation and its operation, Iberville Parish, the Civil War and Reconstruction in Louisiana, social activities and family matters. Manuscript volumes 1-31 reflect the business affairs of Joseph Erwin and include estate record books (1825-1848), cashbooks (1834-1852), expense account book (1836-1849), memoranda books (1812, 1829-52, bank books (1812, 1837-1846), daybook (1843-1847), and a diary (1827-1838). Volumes 32-36 contain daybooks (1826-1848, 1854-1858) and plantation record books (1849-1860) of Colonel Andrew Haynes concerning his estate and the management of his plantation by Edward J. Gay. Edward J. Gay's own record books, v. 37-92, consist of cashbooks (1860-1874, 1883), crop report book (1895-1904), daybooks (1857-1860, 1869-1874, 1877), memorandum books (1862-1908, undated), time books (1872-1887, undated), and notebooks (1865-1866). Volumes 93-164 comprise the record books of his grandson, Senator Edward J. Gay, III. They include cashbooks (1896-1898), a cane report book (1899-1900), memorandum books (1896, 1899), and scrapbooks (1880-1903, 1918-1919). A photograph album of the Gay family and friends, v. 165, is also among the manuscript volumes.

The collection includes letters from the following: P.A. Champonier, T.S. Garrett, G.W.C. Lee, Francis B. Fay, George Knapp, A.L.D. Conrad, H. Von Phul, Jr., E.G.W. Butler, Charles Dickinson, C.B. Turnbull, David N. Barrow, T.P. Leathers, Isaac Erwin, James Ware, John H. Randolph, Robert Pugh, John N. Jewett, Henry J. Sanders, M. Schlatre, Thomas H. Ellis, T.G. Sparks, M.P. Schwing, Andrew P. Calhoun, H.D. Minor, A. Ferry, Septime Fortier, Michael Fortier, and Florient Fortier, J.C. Keener, Truston Polk, F.M. Kent, Edward D. White, William T. Sherman, G. Mason Graham, David Boyd and William T. Gay.

Papers from Edward J. Gay‟s campaign for and tenure in the U.S. House of Representatives (1885-1889) are also present and relate to political participation of African Americans and race relations, the sugar tariff, patronage, flood control and levees, and state and local politics, especially comments about William P. Kellogg, Henry C. Warmoth, Francis T. Nicholls, and Samuel McEnery. Correspondents include, among others, T. G. Sparks, Fred Gates, Andrew Price, and Sen. R.L. Gibson

LIST OF SERIES

I. Correspondence and Other Papers, 1797-1938, undated

II. Printed items, 1837-1911, undated

III. Photographs, 1874-1901, undated

IV. Manuscript Volumes, 1825-1919, undated

COLLECTION DESCRIPTION

Series I., Correspondence and Other Papers, 1797-1938, undated

Box 1: 1796-1822

Correspondence among various Erwin family members particularly Joseph Erwin, his wife Lavinia, and sons John and Joseph Erwin, Jr. Business correspondence between Joseph Erwin and business associates, particularly John B. Craighead and Andrew Hynes, as well as correspondence between the Erwin family and the family of John B. Craighead. Many of these letters give details of estates in Davidson County, Tenn. as well as the yield and conditions of crops. Bills of sale for slaves provide some names, ages, and origins of sale documenting the movement of slaves from markets in the north to the plantations of the south, particularly from Baltimore, Md. to La. A receipt shows payment by Joseph Erwin for the medical care of a slave (February 3, 1813). Also included is a letter from Thomas K. Harris to Hynes discussing the disorganization of his brigade (September 15, 1815) and a letter of resignation of Andrew Hynes from his position as Adjutant General of the State of Tennessee (June 20, 1816).

Financial records such as account lists, receipts, and promissory notes show costs of household items and plantation supplies. Also of note are deeds of land sold to Joseph Erwin in Davidson County, Tenn. with an attached sketch of the property (June 9, 1797), a deed of sale for land along the Cumberland River to Joseph Erwin (November 1, 1805), a description of a tract of land in Iberville Parish given to Joseph Leblanc by the King of Spain (February 28, 1772), and a deed of land acquired by N. Wilson from Joseph Erwin (April 17, 1816). Legal documents include powers of attorney between Joseph Erwin and Andrew Hynes, affidavits relating to unpaid debt, Louisiana state taxes for Joseph Erwin, and receipts for payment by Joseph Erwin for a tract of land from Joseph Leblanc (March 17-September 4, 1813).

Box 2: 1823-1827

Correspondence among the Erwin family members and friends, especially Andrew Hynes and John B. Craighead. Business matters relate to plantations, such as the state of sugar and cotton crops, costs of farming supplies, prices of crops at market, and prices for shipping tobacco, cotton, molasses, and slaves by steamboat. Family members discuss the health of Joseph Erwin, Jr. who was interned in a mental hospital. Numerous bills of sale for slaves, both families and individuals, contain some names, their prices, and places of origin.

Of note is a letter that indicates several disputes between Andrew Hynes and Joseph Erwin (August 13, 1826). Additionally there is correspondence between Hynes and N. Wilson surrounding the purchase of 60 slaves in a joint business venture (August 9, 1825). A receipt shows the cost of Joseph Erwin, Jr.‟s care (December 29, 1826), and documents absolve Erwin of legal obligations he incurred 1821-1822 because of his mental state (November 2-12, 1827).

Box 3: 1828-1831

Financial documents such as promissory notes, receipts, and settlement terms regarding a business dispute between Andrew Hynes and Joseph Erwin. These documents also include receipts for wages as overseer of a plantation, room and board in an asylum, and prices of cotton and sugar crops. Legal documents consist of powers of attorney, instruments of garnishment, and notarized affidavits relating to personal debts owed by members of the Erwin family. Personal correspondence involves Joseph Erwin, his wife, their children, and Andrew Hynes, while business correspondence concerns the prices of cotton, sugar, and molasses both at market and for shipment on steamboats. Legal sums for Andrew Hynes appear at the Davidson County Court House in a matter related to the debts of Joseph Erwin (April 3, 1828), (July 15, 1828).

Numerous bills of sale for slaves, both families and individuals, contain some names, their prices, and places of origin. A letter from J.B. Craighead to Andrew Hynes relates the story of D. Irion arriving by steamboat one night and running off with many of the slaves. He concludes that Irion is now in jail waiting to be charged (April 12, 1831). Also included are correspondence and shipping documents showing that slaves were moved south on a steamboat (March 1828). Documents related to the estate of Joseph Erwin Sr. include a detailed list of property (January 3, 1829).

Correspondence of Joseph Erwin, Sr. discusses the division of his estate, including what should be done with the proceeds from the sale of land. Joseph Erwin‟s last wills and testaments are included, one dictating that his personal slave, Job Waker, as well as Waker‟s wife and children, should be freed upon Erwin‟s death and given $1,000 and six acres of land on Bayou Grosse Tete (October 25, 1828), the other stipulating how his property is to be divided (December 26, 1828). A letter to Andrew Hynes gives the details of Joseph Erwin‟s death (April 14, 1829) and another announces the death of Margaret Erwin in Baton Rouge (November 13, 1830).

Box 4: 1832-July 1833

Financial documents such as receipts, drafts, promissory notes, account sheets and tax notices. Bills and account sheets show costs for education, boarding in an asylum, shipping of goods on steamships, and farming equipment. Correspondence discusses the prices of cotton, sugar, and molasses at market. Letters give details of the cholera epidemic of 1833, including the number of deaths, one of which was Joseph Erwin Jr., and the disease‟s geographic movement via the river (April 23-July 3, 1833).

Legal documents show slaves used as mortgages for personal debt, and tax notices give the total numbers of slaves on a plantation and their tax value (October 26, 1832). Additional legal documents give details on the division of the Erwin estate.

Box 5: August 1833-June 1835

Financial documents such as promissory notes, account lists, and receipts detail the costs of everyday items. Business correspondence among Andrew Hynes, John B. Craighead and others associated with the Erwin estate concern the plantation, the state of sugar and cotton crops, costs of farming supplies, and prices of crops at market and shipping by steamboat. Legal documents include public letters of protest relating to unpaid notes and a retainer for a lawyer and court summonses. Of note is a letter to Edward Gay from Edward Mitchell, his grandfather, in which Mitchell gives spiritual advice and discusses personal matters (November 19, 1834).

Box 6: August 1835-June 1838

Correspondence among Andrew Hynes, John B. Craighead, and others associated with the Erwin estate includes updates on various family members‟ health, social activities, and daily life. Of note is business correspondence between the family members and their associates and merchants, particularly Lambeth & Thompson and Yeatman & Co. Many letters discuss the price of cotton and sugar both in the U.S. and England. Financial documents include promissory notes, receipts, and account lists showing the cost of farm equipment, supplies, and household items. Legal documents such as powers of attorney and settlements pertain to the succession of the Erwin estate.

Box 7: July 1838-June 1839

Business correspondence among Andrew Hynes, John B. Craighead, and their merchants, especially Yeatman & Co. and Lambeth & Thompson discuss sugar and molasses crops in Louisiana and Tennessee. Financial documents include promissory notes, account sheets reflecting crop yields, and shipping documents such as freight receipts and bills of lading.

A letter written by Margaret Ewing to Andrew Hynes describes a costume ball and mentions that African-Americans need a pass in order to travel safely at night (December 2, 1838). A letter to Andrew Hynes from J. Allen informs him that one of his slaves and her two children are aboard his boat, but one slave escaped before she could be put onboard (February 25, 1838). A U.S. land grant to Laurent Millaudone is signed by a secretary of President Martin Van Buren (December 3, 1838).

Box 8: July 1839-May 1840

Business correspondence, account lists, receipts, and promissory notes written by Andrew Hynes, John B. Craighead, and their merchants, especially Carr & Shearon, Yeatman & Co., A. Ledoux & Co., Adam & Whitehead, and Gay, Glasgow & Co. give details of sugar and molasses crops. Included are two letters from Edward Gay to Andrew Hynes providing details of Gay‟s business in St. Louis and expressing concern and anxiety over flooding in New Orleans (April 2-May 21, 1840). Also included is a bill of sale for a slave named Isaac, a gunsmith, to Hynes (September 9, 1838).

Box 9: June 1840-December 1840

Business correspondence between Andrew Hynes and John B. Craighead discuss activity on their plantations or with merchants Gay, Glasgow & Co., Adam & Whitall, Yeatman & Co., A. Ledoux & Co., Newcomb & Brothers, Stephen S. Ewing, and DeBlanc & Eastland. Included are account sheets listing goods shipped, purchased, and sold and the amounts of crops produced. Of note is a letter from Lavinia Gay to her father, Andrew Hynes in which she relates family news from St. Louis. She mentions that Illinois has voted against the Whigs and the family must make arrangements to go to Washington in March to attend the inauguration of General Harrison (November 14, 1840).

Box 10: 1841

Business correspondence between Hynes and Craighead with various merchants, especially Adams & Whitall, Edward J. Gay, A. Ledoux & Co., Yeatman & Company and H. D. Newcomb, concerns the production and sale of sugar and molasses. Letters also discuss the purchase of farming equipment, such as crushing mills and sugar houses. Financial documents include issues of the Merchant's Transcripts and New Orleans Current, and account sheets showing balances, transactions, crop yields, and disbursement. Legal documents include notices of transfer, notices of protest for unpaid notes, bills for lawyers‟ services, and agreements in legal disputes. Of note is a receipt for legal expenses from a lawyer defending a slave, John White, who was accused of stabbing an officer as he was being arresting for larceny (March 23, 1841).

Also of note is a letter from J. Leftwich to J.B. Craighead informing Craighead that his slaves are returning from Hot Springs, Ark., after receiving water treatment (July 11, 1841). A receipt from Dr. Hornsby indicates medical treatment for some of Hynes‟ and Craighead‟s slaves (December 8, 1841).

Box 11: January 1842-September 1842

Business correspondence between Hynes and Craighead with various merchants, especially Adams & Whitall, H. D. Newcomb, Edward Gay, and J.W. Burbridge, concerns the production, shipment, and sale of sugar and molasses. Legal documents include public notices of protest, a notice of bankruptcy for George Cox in Madison County, Ala., and tax notices. Shipping documents include bills of lading, inventories for the steamboats Persian and General Pike, and an issue of the Annual Statement of the New Orleans Price Current, Commercial Intelligencer and Merchants' Transcript.

A bill from Dr. Byreahart shows his activities on the Erwin plantation through March 1841 and indicates medical aid to slaves (January 1, 1842). Business correspondence between Edward J. Gay and John B. Craighead discusses in detail a new process for refining sugar (February 17, 1842).

Box 12: October 1842-April 1843

Financial documents such as account sheets, promissory notes, receipts, and bills of lading for the steamboat Clipper; legal documents such as a notice for Andrew Hynes to appear in court, a notice of bankruptcy, and public instrument of protest for unpaid promissory notes; and business correspondence between Hynes and Craighead and various merchants, especially Adams & Whitall, J.W. Burbridge, Edward Gay, and H.D. Newcomb & Co., concerning the production, shipment, and sale of sugar and molasses.

An agreement written by Andrew Hynes and J.B. Craighead in order to obtain a joint mortgage gives an account of the physical dimensions of their land, describes the buildings, livestock, and farming equipment, and provides a partial list of their slaves with names and occupations given (February 18, 1843). Business correspondence between A.W. Putman and Hynes provides a description of Halifax Plantation located in Hinds County, Miss. (December 27, 1842).

Box 13: May 1843-December 1843

Financial documents include promissory notes, account lists, and receipts. Business correspondence between Hynes and Craighead and their merchants, especially W. J.Gasquet & Co., Adam & Whitall, E. J. Branbridge, Stark, Day, Stauffer & Co., Frederick & Edward Prime, and Edward Gay, discusses the production, shipment, and sale of sugar and molasses. Of note is a letter between Andrew Hynes and his daughter, Lavinia Gay, in which she expresses concern the levee may break due to the high level of the Mississippi River (May 13, 1843). Also of note is letter between Ann Cox and Hynes that mentions a yellow fever outbreak in New Orleans primarily confined to Charity Hospital (September 21, 1843).

Box 14: 1844

Business correspondence between Hynes and Craighead and their merchants especially H.D. Newcomb Bros., Slark, Day, Stauffer Co., Adams & Whitall, Jarvis & Andrews, and Edward Gay, discusses the production, shipment, and sale of sugar and molasses. Financial documents include promissory notes, account lists, receipts, and bills of lading. Legal documents include transfers of land and notices of protest for nonpayment of promissory notes. The last will of John B. Craighead states that all of his goods, chattel, and property are left to his brother J.E. Craighead (June 21, 1844), and a receipt from the Iberville parish jail shows the cost of jailing two slaves, a man named Tom arrested for drunkenness, and a woman named Susan said to be found with stolen property (September 22, 1844). Medical documents of Dr. Byrenheidt detail medical treatment for various slaves (March 1844). Letters between Andrew Hynes and his son-in-law, Edward Gay, tell of flooding in St. Louis due to record-high water of the Mississippi River (May 24, 1844).

Box 15: 1845

Included in this box is personal correspondence among Andrew Hynes, his daughter Mary Jane Hynes, and his son-in-law Edward Gay; business correspondence involves Hynes and Craighead and their merchants and associates, especially Edward Gay and Stark, Day, Stauffer & Co.; and financial documents include invoices, receipts, promissory notes, and account sheets. A bill from the parish jail of Iberville for the arrest, holding, and trial of a slave named Manuel Mason who belonged to Hynes and Craighead is included (March 24, 1845). Legal documents include certificates of mortgage and U.S. land grants signed by the secretary of President James K. Polk (March 17, 1845). A supplement to the will of Jane Craighead sets the terms to free one of her slaves. She stipulates that if the laws of Tennessee do not allow for emancipation, the slaves are to be taken to a state that does (September 25, 1845).

Box 16: January 1846-September 1846

This box contains financial records such as inventories, invoices, promissory notes, bills and account lists showing the sale of sugar and molasses for Andrew Hynes and John B. Craighead. Business correspondence between Hynes and Craighead and various merchants, especially Edward Gay, McCall &

Adams, R.H. & G.M Bayly concern the production, sale, and transportation of sugar and molasses. A letter to Hynes and Craighead proposes the construction of a small railroad leading from the cane fields to the sugar house and the construction of a water-powered sugar grinder (February 26, 1846), while another reports that the overseer on the Hewitt, Herso & Co. plantation is too hard on his slaves, as several have been shot and the rest are revolting (February 16, 1846). Correspondence from François Bouis to Andrew Hynes informs him that one of his slaves, a man named Old Moses, has found his wife on his plantation (January 18, 1846). Also included is personal correspondence between Hynes and Edward Gay providing news from Texas concerning the Mexican-American War (May 2, 1846).

Box 17: October 1846-March 1847

Included in this box are financial documents such as promissory notes, receipts, and bills of sale for slaves, and business correspondence between Andrew Hynes and John B. Craighead with their various merchants, especially M.L. Eastmen, McCall & Adams, Edward Gay, Price & Frost, W. & J. Montgomery and P.R. McCreery regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar. In a letter to Andrew Hynes, Margaret Kent complains the slaves he sold her mother are old and expensive to maintain (December 2, 1846), and Mrs. Bouis writes to Hynes to inform him that his slave, Old Moses, is returning home after visiting his wife, and that he behaved well while on their plantation (December 30, 1846). Hynes also writes to Dr. C. Clement and W.E. Edwards Esq. about his plans to divide the Hynes-Craighead plantation (March 13, 1847).

Box 18: April 1847-October 1847

Financial documents include account sheets, invoices, receipts, and a summary of the estimated value of the plantation of Joseph Erwin (September 3, 1847). Business correspondence involves Andrew Hynes and various merchants, especially Edward Gay, Price & Frost, John Gay, Slark, Day, Stauffer & Co., T. C. Woods, and McCall & Adams. Also included is correspondence from Thomas B. Craighead to his brother John suggesting that a slave, Martha, and her son, could be freed in Illinois, Ohio, or possibly Liberia (July 1, 1847). Also included is a letter to Hynes from his daughter Mary Jane McCreery in which she states that smallpox is raging in St. Louis. She also mentions she is having problems with her slave boy who “runs in the street” with the other boys and wishes to exchange him for a girl (May 26, 1847).

Box 19: November 1847-April 1848

Included in this box is business correspondence among Andrew Hynes, J.B. Craighead, J.E. Craighead, and their merchants; personal correspondence between Andrew Hynes and various family members and friends; financial documents such as promissory notes, receipts, and bills of lading; and legal documents such as a public instrument of protest.

Of note is a letter from New Orleans merchants, Price and Frost, informing Hynes that someone was trying to cash a forged draft in his name (March 19, 1848). Another letter from Price and Frost tells of the apprehension of the man, Tom Levi, who is being held for forgery in a New Orleans jail (March 20, 1848). Two letters from Tom Levi ask Hynes for aid in procuring a lawyer and for forgiveness for his crime (May 22-June 8, 1848).

Box 20: May 1848-May 1849

Included in this box is correspondence to Andrew Hynes from various family and friends; business correspondence to Andrew Hynes from business associates concerning the sale, production, and transportation of sugar and molasses; financial documents such as promissory notes, account sheets, and receipts for various goods and services; and legal documents such as deeds of land, land seizures, and judgments for suits involving Hynes. Several letters to John B. Craighead from W. Larkin relate to Larkin‟s escorting Thomas Craighead to an asylum in Kentucky or Pennsylvania (January 6-February 22, 1848), and in a letter to John B. Craighead, his nephew informs him of his brother‟s death and of

problems transporting the body to the family cemetery (January 7, 1848). Also of note is a receipt showing the cost of retrieving a runaway slave named Bill (December 31, 1848).

Box 21: June 1849-February 1850

Financial documents such as receipts, account sheets, promissory notes, and tax notices. Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from family members relates to family news and events, and includes a letter to John B. Craighead providing an update on his son‟s mental health (June 10-June 25, 1848). Business correspondence to J.B. Craighead from his various agents, factors, and associates, especially R.H. & G.M. Bayly, Maunsel White & Co., Edward J. Gay & Co., and B.C. Adams concern the sale, production, and transportation of sugar and molasses. Of note are documents related to lawsuits among the heirs of the Erwin estate, including Louisiana Supreme Court decisions related to the cases.

Box 22: March 1850-December 1850

Included is personal and business correspondence to J.B. Craighead and Edward J. Gay from various merchants, factors, and associates, especially R. Yeatman & Co., Edward J. Gay & Co., and B. Adams & Co. that concerns the production, sale and transportation of sugar and molasses. Financial documents include invoices, promissory notes, receipts and account sheets. Of note is a list of slaves owned by Andrew Hynes which groups the slaves into families listing names, ages, skills, and prices (April 2, 1850).

Box 23: January 1851-August 1851

Included in this box are financial documents such as promissory notes, receipts, invoices, bills, and business correspondence for both Edward J. Gay and John B. Craighead concerning the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other agricultural goods. Personal correspondence to both Gay and Craighead from various family members relay family news. Of note is a letter from Lavinia Gay to her husband telling of severe flooding as well as the threat of cholera in St. Louis (June 8-June 12, 1850).

Box 24: September 1851-April 1852

Financial documents such as promissory notes, account inventories and receipts. Business correspondence to both Edward J. Gay and Thomas B. Craighead concerns the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other agricultural products. Legal documents such as tax notices and resolutions addressing the issue of loose livestock found roaming on or near the Mississippi River levee (December 31, 1851). Personal correspondence within the Edward Gay family discusses family news and health. Of note is a letter from W.B. Robertson that describes how to plant sugarcane (September 22, 1851), and a letter to John B. Craighead providing a detailed description of an operation performed on Robert Craighead (November 19, 1851).

Box 25: May 1852-December 1852, undated

Financial documents such as receipts, bills of lading, invoices and account inventories for the crop of 1851. Business correspondence to both Edward J. Gay and Thomas B. Craighead regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other agricultural goods. Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from family members discusses family news. Of note is a detailed map showing the layout of the Hynes/Gay plantation in 1852 divided into fields defined by crop, acreage, and the total amounts of each crop grown on the plantation (undated).

Box 26: January 1853-June 1853

Financial documents such as receipts, invoices, account lists, and bills for both Edward J. Gay and John B. Craighead. Business correspondence to both John B. Craighead and Edward J. Gay regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other agricultural goods. Certification from the Land Office of Louisiana shows John B. Craighead owned swamp land (January 12, 1853). Other

business correspondence to Edward J. Gay gives the financial details of the Hynes/Craighead plantation (April 16, 1853). A receipt for services involved in tracking, holding and returning a runaway slave, Israel, for Edward Gay. It includes the cost of advertising a notice of the runaway and reward for his capture, shackles, jail fees, and transportation back to Edward Gay (February 1, 1853). Personal correspondence to both Edward J. Gay and John B. Craighead contains family news and events. A letter to John B. Craighead from his brother James gives details of the estate of their late brother William (March 15, 1853).

Box 27: July 1853-February 1854

Contains financial documents such as receipts, invoices, account lists, bills of lading, and promissory notes; business correspondence to Edward J. Gay and John B. Craighead from various merchants and factors regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other agricultural goods. Personal correspondence to both John B. Craighead and Edward J. Gay from family and friends contains family news. A letter from Joseph Elliston to John B. Craighead mentions Craighead has lost a large lawsuit, and that yellow fever has broken out on Craighead‟s plantation and cholera has broken out in New Orleans (December 8, 1853). A letter to Edward J. Gay from William Gay informs him that St. Louis has a large number of smallpox cases (February 10, 1854), and a letter from James Craighead to John B. Craighead mentions yellow fever has spread to Demopolis, Ala. (December 9, 1853). Of note is a letter from A.J. Duncan to John B. Craighead stating he has a slave whose wife and children belong to Craighead, and he would like to buy them so the family can be together (December 28, 1853).

Box 28: March 1854-June 1854

Included in this box are financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, account listings, and invoices. Business correspondence to Edward J. Gay or John B. Craighead from various merchants, planters, and associates regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, cotton, and other goods. Also included is personal correspondence to Edward Gay and John B. Craighead from family or friends that discusses family and community news and events.

Box 29: July 1854-February 1856

Included in this box are financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, account listings, and invoices. Business correspondence to Edward J. Gay from various merchants, planters, and associates regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, cotton, and other goods. Documents related to the succession of Joseph Erwin‟s estate provide many names, ages, and prices of slaves, as well as to whom they were sold (March 10, 1855). Of note is a statement appointing Phereby White Craighead tutor of the minor Craighead children (September 21, 1854) followed by a letter from Lavinia Craighead mentioning that Phereby Craighead has refused guardianship (November 17, 1854). Of note is a letter from William Gay in St. Louis to his brother Edward Gay that relays family news and mentions that three of the family slaves have run away with nine other slaves from the city (October 25, 1854).

Box 30: March 1856-December 1856

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or that discuss financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities.

Box 31: 1857

Financial documents related to Edward Gay‟s businesses, such as invoices, bills of lading, receipts, and account sheets. Personal correspondence to Edward Gay and Lavinia Gay from various family members. Business correspondence to Edward Gay from various merchants regarding production, sale, and

transportation of sugar, molasses, and other goods. Of note are the final terms showing the settlement of two cases related to the succession of Joseph Erwin: Wilson vs. Craighead and Erwin vs. Burbridge that state the sums due from both Hynes and Craighead, as well as Edward Gay‟s financial obligations (April 30, 1857). Also of note is a map of the land owned by Edward Gay, Rils & Marioneaux (January 31, 1857).

Box 32: January 1858-May 1858

This box contains business correspondence to Edward Gay from various merchants regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other goods. Personal correspondence and telegraph dispatches to Edward Gay and Lavinia Gay from various family members. Financial documents such as promissory notes, bills of lading, insurance policies, and account lists showing business activity. Of interest is an issue of Merchants' Exchange Price Current addressed to Edward Gay that describes the previous year‟s business market in detail (January 1, 1858). A letter to Edward Gay from Chad Wiggins that asks Gay if he wishes to buy a slave in St. Louis, a carpenter, being sold because he cannot get along with his wife (May 4, 1858). Additionally of note is a letter to Edward Gay from P.M. Dickinson in Memphis in which Edward Gay is informed of the arrest of two white men attempting to sell several stolen slaves belonging to him (May 12, 1858).

Box 33: June 1858-November 1858

Business correspondence to Edward Gay from various merchants. Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members. Financial documents, promissory notes; bills of lading; invoices and receipts. Correspondence includes a letter to Edward Gay from W.H. Glasgow mentioning flooding in St. Louis (June 7, 1858); a letter written to Edward Gay from P.E. Jennings that informs him several slaves were found drunk and gambling at the house of a free African-American woman. Jennings also comments that the Plaquemine council has banned all free African-Americans who do not own property, so Gay must make arrangements for the freed slaves of Col. Hynes living in the city (August 25, 1858). Correspondence from P. Daigre to Edward Gay talks about a yellow fever outbreak around Plaquemine, La. (July 20-September 24, 1858). Of note is a letter from Z. Yorke to Edward Gay claiming he is an agent for a man who was robbed of a slave by two men now being held in Memphis (June 14, 1858). Also of note is a letter to Edward Gay from P.M. Dickinson who reports that the two slave thieves have been charged with kidnapping and are being held in the city jail (June 12, 1858).

Box 34: December 1858-February 1859

In this box are financial documents, such as bills of lading, receipts, invoices, and promissory notes; personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members and friends; business correspondence to Edward Gay from merchants regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other goods. Of note is a letter written by John Long regarding the proposal of a new road that would cross Gay‟s plantation in Plaquemine, La. The letter includes a map of the intended new route (December 10, 1858).

Box 35: March 1859-May 1859

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members and friends.

Financial documents such as account listings, bills of lading, promissory notes, receipts, and invoices. Correspondence between William Gay and Edward Gay mentions that the outcome of a St. Louis election was due to the success of the “black republican” ticket (April 5, 1859); letter from James H. Britton, cashier of the Southern Bank of St. Louis, informing Edward Gay he has been elected director of the bank (March 7, 1859). Business correspondence to Edward Gay from various factors and merchants, including his brother, William Gay, and his father, John Gay, regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other goods. Letters to Edward Gay from his brother mention that the steamboat St. Nicholas was destroyed in an explosion in which 75 people were killed (April 29, 1859). He also notes that due to the threatening news of war, prices have increased and that a new steamboat being constructed

in St. Louis will be named Edward J. Gay (May 7, 1859). Of note is a small map showing plots of land on the Gay plantation (April 30, 1859).

Box 36: June 1859-October 1859

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay and Lavinia Gay from various family members and friends. Business correspondence between Edward Gay and merchants regarding the production, transportation, and sale of sugar, cotton, and other goods. Financial documents such as receipts, promissory notes, invoices, and account lists. A letter from Lavinia Gay to Edward Gay expresses her concern for their daughter, Sophia, at school in Maryland, as she has heard of trouble at Harper‟s Ferry (October 23, 1859). A letter from Sheriff W. McRae of Warren County, Miss. informs Edward Gay that one of his runaway slaves is being held in the Vicksburg jail (October 4, 1859), and a letter from Crutcher McRaven states that they have retrieved his runaway slave from Vicksburg and are sending him back (October 25, 1859). Also included are two bills of sale of slaves sold to Edward Gay (June 22, 1859).

Box 37: November 1859-January 1860

Financial documents such as receipts, invoices, account sheets, promissory notes, and bills of lading, as well as a financial statement of Edward Gay & Co. Included is business correspondence to Edward Gay from various merchants, but chiefly from his brother William Gay and from potential overseers inquiring about work. A letter of recommendation written by J. Daugherty to Edward Gay in which Daugherty recommends an overseer who is married to an African-American woman (December 19, 1859). A letter from Poindexter & Little to Edward Gay states that Gay is trying to sell slaves they describe as a “class of negroes” that are hard to sell at auction (November 10, 1859). A bill of sale shows that two slaves were traded for two other slaves by Edward Gay (December 7, 1859). A letter from A. Williams to Gay that asks him to quarter eleven of his slaves overnight (December 12, 1859). One letter from J. Weiseman states that a slave he purchased from Edward Gay has a tumor on his side and that Gay is responsible for the value of the slave if he dies in surgery (December 23, 1859), while another informs Gay that one of his slaves was sold at auction, but upon being examined by a doctor was found to be unfit, having bad lungs, so the sale was not finalized (January 28, 1860). A letter from A. Weiseman to Edward Gay states that a possible runaway slave may give Gay‟s name if caught instead of Weiseman‟s (December 26, 1859).

Box 38: February 1860-April 1860

Business correspondence addressed to Edward J. Gay from various merchants and associates regarding sugar and molasses. Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from family members concerns family news and business. Legal correspondence from Edward Gay inquires about receiving a patent and a copy of a petition in the civil case of Richard Downs vs. Edward J. Gay; financial documents such as account sheets, promissory notes, bills of lading, and invoices. Of note is a letter to Edward J. Gay from William Tecumseh Sherman, then superintendent of the Louisiana Seminary of Learning, informing him that John Craighead was expelled from the school for smoking tobacco (February 4, 1860--in vault). Also of note is a copy of the change of domicile record showing Edward Gay changed his official residence from Missouri to Louisiana (February 16, 1860).

Box 39: May 1860-September 1860

Financial documents such as promissory notes, account listings, receipts, and bills of lading. Personal correspondence addressed to Edward J. Gay from family members and friends discusses both family, local, and national news and events. Business correspondence addressed to Edward J. Gay from various merchants, especially from his brother, William Gay, regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other goods.

Of note is a letter from W. T. Sherman to Gay related to the expulsion of John Craighead from the Louisiana Seminary of Learning (June 17, 1860--in vault). A letter from Rev. P.M. Goodwyn addresses

slave trading on Sundays and asks Gay to set an example and refrain from trading on Sunday (August 27, 1860). Also of note is a letter from E.H. Williamson to Edward Gay announcing there will be a barbecue for presidential candidate John Bell and his running mate Edward Everett (July 24, 1860).

Box 40: October 1860-January 1861

Financial documents such as account sheets, promissory notes, bills of lading, receipts, and invoices. Business correspondence to Edward Gay from various merchants regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other goods. A letter to Edward Gay from W. Edwards mentions the people of Missouri becoming excited by the state of national politics and comments that most people do not believe the Union will be dissolved (November 3, 1860). Letter from William Gay to Edward Gay relating business news and reporting that Missouri has voted for the Union ticket and Lincoln will be the next president (November 6, 1860). Correspondence from Edward Gay to L. Janin tells that the people of his parish tried unsuccessfully to elect conservatives in order to temper the desire for secession (January 17, 1861).

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members conveys personal and family news as well as letters concerning the pending U.S. Civil War. A letter from Lavinia Gay to her husband Edward J. Gay gives an update on the family‟s health and also mentions she is worried about what will happen if “old Lincoln” is elected. She also expresses a desire to go south for the winter if the threat of Civil War is not real (November 4, 1860). Correspondence to Edward Gay from M. Martin questions how the south is doing in its preparations for dissolution of the Union (November 18, 1860). Correspondence to Lavinia Gay from M. Martin mentions she is glad to hear they are still Union supporters despite their southern home (January 19, 1861).

Receipt of payment by Edward Gay to Weiseman & Lynch showing Edward Gay paid $980 for three slaves (14 November 1860). A letter from Weiseman & Lynch asking Edward Gay to ship a slave he wished to return to Vicksburg, Miss. (December 28, 1860). An order, in French, to pay an African-American named Amsted $10 for work done on the Craighead plantation (January 13, 1861). A letter from A. Weiseman to Edward J. Gay asks him to send the slave named Big Sam to Vicksburg so he can be forwarded on to a man in Crystal Springs, Miss. (January 16, 1861).

Box 41: February 1861-May 1861

In this box is personal correspondence to Edward Gay or Lavinia Gay from various family members and friends regarding family or personal news. Correspondence to Edward Gay from T. P. Fay who writes from Boston, Mass. speaks about the political environment of the country as well as the sentiments of the people in the north regarding secession and the threat of civil war (February 7, 1861). M. Martin writes to Gay from St. Louis, Mo. of family news and mentions that Edward Gay now is a citizen of a foreign country. She relays that Missouri is in the process of selecting delegates to go to the state convention but thinks that Missouri will stand by the Union (February 12, 1861). Martin also comments that, “black Republicanism has been extinguished from every ward except the first and second” (April 7, 1861) and mentions the St. Louis massacre and the build-up to the massacre in which the U.S. arrested the pro-Confederate Missouri militia (May 12, 1861). Letter from M. Johnston, who writes from Nashville, Tenn. to Edward Gay of the threat of war, mentions Tennessee‟s convention to decide whether to leave the Union. He also gives his views of the state of the country and speaks of the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812 (February 13, 1861). A follow-up letter from Johnston mentions that Tennessee is still pro-Union and that if given the chance to vote, the people of Mississippi and Alabama would stick to the Union as well. He also comments that the peace conference in Tennessee has not been able to come to any conclusion (February 27, 1861).

Financial documents such as account sheets, receipts, bill of lading, invoices, and promissory notes related to the business activities of Edward Gay. Business correspondence addressed to Edward Gay

from various merchants regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses and other goods. Correspondence from William Gay informs Edward Gay that shipments of goods from the south are being confiscated and that trade to the south has been cut by the U.S. Government. He also states that arms seized in Baton Rouge have made it to St. Louis and into the hands of pro-secession state forces, and he thinks that there will be a bloody outcome if Union forces try and claim the weapons as property of the U.S. Government (May 10, 1861).

Box 42: June 1861-December 1861

Included in this box is correspondence that mentions how the Civil War is affecting business, trade, communications or the lives of family, friends, and associates of Edward J. Gay. Personal correspondence of Gay concerns various friends and family who give news or insight on family or personal affairs. Letters from M. Johnston, who writes from Nashville, Tenn. mention how Edward Gay‟s family and friends are faring now the war has started as well as gives general war news (June 29-October 14, 1861). Letter from Ann Phillips to Edward Gay mentioning the state of war, news about Lincoln‟s cabinet on the verge of resignation, and the state of the Union blockade (November 9, 1861). Correspondence to Edward J. Gay from M. Davis providing details of the Battle of Manassas which Davis witnessed (November 18, 1861). Further correspondence from Davis mentions the diplomatic confrontation between England and the U.S. known as the Trent Affair (December 21, 1861). Financial documents of Edward J. Gay such as receipts, promissory notes, account listings, bills of lading, and drafts related to the production, transportation, and sale/purchase of sugar, molasses, and other goods. Business correspondence to Edward J. Gay from various merchants regarding the state of the crops, the transportation of goods, and the prices at market for sugar, molasses, and other goods. In a letter to Edward Gay, Samuel Mathews writing from the Baton Rouge Barracks asks for shoes and supplies and mentions that Gay‟s son, Andrew, is doing well and that the “Edmoore Rangers” are generally well and in good sprits (September 5, 1861).

Box 43: January 1862-April 1862

This box contains financial documents of Edward J. Gay such as receipts, promissory notes, account listings showing sales, purchases, and balances, bills of lading, and drafts related to the production, transportation, and sale/purchase of sugar, molasses, and other goods. Business correspondence to Edward J. Gay from various merchants regarding the state of the crops, the transportation of goods, and the prices at market for sugar, molasses, and other goods.

Correspondence mentioning how the Civil War is affecting business, trade, communications or the lives of family, friends, and associates of Edward J. Gay. A letter from Andrew Ewing to Edward J. Gay informs Gay how his son, Andrew, is faring and mentions that a battle seems likely when the weather improves. He also states that the ladies of Nashville at first suffered from over-enthusiasm in their support of the troops, but have since divided into companies where each lady serves one day a week (January 9, 1862). A telegraph dispatch from Andrew Ewing to Edward J. Gay informs him of the battle at Fort Donnelson (February 15, 1862), while another dispatch from Memphis informs him that the military has seized steamboats and all supplies located in the city and advises Gay to send nothing else upriver (March 11, 1862). A letter from Cummings, Edwards & Co. who write from Memphis, Tenn. to Edward Gay mentions a large battle reported near the city of Iuka, Miss. (April 3, 1862). P. A. Girard & Co. writes from New Orleans and mentions that reports of a large fleet of mortar boats within sight of their forts is without foundation (April 3, 1862). E. M. Marvin writes to Gay from Vicksburg and informs him that General Price‟s army has arrived in the city and many of the wounded from the Battle of Shiloh are in hospital there (April 19, 1862). A letter to Edward Gay from R. Edwards in Memphis mentions the fall of New Orleans as well as the preparations for the Battle of Corinth (April 26, 1862).

Of note is a letter to Edward Gay from Jules Aucoin explaining that he has detained one of Gay‟s slaves because the slave was strangling him and he has the “blood marks” to prove it. He says he would let the

slave go but feels it would encourage the others who encouraged the accused slave during the struggle to “kill the wicked man and throw him in a ditch” (April 27, 1862).

Box 44: May 1862-January 1863

Included is correspondence mentioning how the Civil War is affecting business, trade, communications or the lives of family, friends, and associates of Edward J. Gay. One letter to Gay from P. Girard in New Orleans informs him that Union forces removed the state flag from City Hall and that they await Gen. Butler‟s arrival in the city (May 2, 1862), while another informs Gay of the state of the market in New Orleans and mentions that the commanding general‟s decrees are as they expected (May 16, 1862). A letter to Edward Gay from J. Daugherty states that Federal troops are numerous in Baton Rouge and reports news that Federal ships are shelling Vicksburg and that there has been a minor fight near Richmond, Va. (July 4, 1862). J. Lodd writes to Gay from Franklin, La. concerning a plantation for sale as he heard Gay is looking for a secure place in which to remove some of his slaves (August 29, 1862), while a list providing the names of the slaves who were relocated from the plantation of Craighead & Johnston as a “matter of safety” is also included (September 20, 1862). Rev. E. Marsin writes to Edward Gay about his fears that New Orleans will be used as a base to carry out “Lincoln‟s proclamation” (October 17, 1862).

Personal correspondence to or from Edward J. Gay and various friends and family gives news or insight to family and personal affairs. Correspondence from William Gay in St. Louis to his brother Edward provides news that their sister, Eliza Gay has died (August 2, 1862). He also writes that authorities are enforcing military law and mentions a proclamation issued by President Lincoln (September 23, 1862). Andrew Gay, son of Edward Gay and soldier in the Confederate Army, writes to his father and mother about his participation in Gen. Braxton Bragg‟s autumn 1862 invasion of Kentucky (October 24, 1862). Correspondence to Sophie Gay from William Gay, her uncle, mentions that smallpox is spreading rapidly in St. Louis and that Confederate forces have taken Springfield, Mo. He also provides news that the Confederate Army has 40 blockade breakers, and that the Emancipation Proclamation has caused much anger in the north verging on the point of rebellion (January 10, 1863).

Financial and legal documents of Edward J. Gay such as receipts, promissory notes, account listings showing sales, purchases, and balances, bills of lading, and drafts related to the production, transportation, and sale of sugar, molasses, and other goods. Legal documents include a receipt for a court case involving the state of Louisiana and a slave named Daniel (May 21, 1862), and a receipt of payment by Edward Gay for the cost of arresting, feeding, and holding two slaves in St. James Parish (June 5, 1862). An order directs Edward Gay to send a team of hands for emergency work on the levee (January 22, 1863) and a list provides the names of these slaves and how long they worked (January 1863).

Business correspondence to Edward J. Gay from various merchants regarding the state of crops, the transportation of goods, and the prices at market for sugar, molasses, and other goods. A letter to Edward Gay from R. McAllister in St. Louis asks for the money due him for Gay selling his sugar. He goes on to tell of a state of terror in Missouri mentioning people being shot on suspicion or arrested and made to swear “the oath,” and requiring all men capable of military service to enlist or pay $10 (July 30, 1862). Correspondence from C. S. Lobdell to Edward Gay informs him that General Pemberton has forbidden all steamboats to go south of Baton Rouge due to the threat of Union gunboats reported to be 10-12 miles below Gay‟s plantation (November 10, 1862). Terms of an agreement between Edward Gay and Henry More resolve a dispute related to the sale of sugar (January 30, 1863).

Box 45: February 1863-January 1864

Included are financial documents such as account sheets showing sales, debt, and profits with various merchants, promissory notes, bills of lading and receipts. Business correspondence to and from Edward J. Gay regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, cotton and other goods with

many letters containing news of the Civil War‟s effect on business. Also included are a letter from the Headquarters U.S. Forces, Plaquemine to Mrs. Dupray instructing her to let William Edwards remove some sugar that is being kept on her plantation (February 3, 1863), a note detailing property seized from Edward Gay by J. H. Allcot, Capt 133rd N. Y. Volunteers (February 17, 1863), and orders from the Department of the Gulf, Headquarters, U.S. Sequestration Commission stating that the officers of the U.S. will induce slaves to return to their plantations and that the slaves will be given a twentieth of the value of the crop or a set amount for their work, which it defines on a monthly basis (February 20, 1863). Receipt of payment by Edward Gay for passage back to Iberville for a slave woman who ran away to New Orleans (February 23, 1863). Letter to Edward Gay from William Gay reporting that all steamboats in St. Louis and Cincinnati have been ordered downriver, possibly to Vicksburg, so Grant‟s army can be moved (March 8, 1863). A note from Capt. Allcot of the 133rd N.Y. Volunteers informs Edward Gay of his order to seize 12 hogsheads of sugar from his plantation for public use (March 10, 1863), and a note from the Office of the Provost Marshal grants permission for Joseph Kleinpeter to ship ten barrels of pork from New Orleans to his plantation (March 21, 1863). Also included are orders from the Department of the Gulf, written with the authority of Major General Banks, stating that Edward Gay, his family, and his plantation have been granted a safeguard (December 11, 1863).

Personal correspondence among Gay family members gives news about family, friends, or updates on the ongoing Civil War. Letters from William Gay in St. Louis, Mo. to Edward Gay state that General Curtis has issued an order to arrest all males or females indulging in treasonable acts (February 16, 1863), that their relative Ned Martin and his friend Felix Bass joined the Confederate Army (March 3, 1863), and that Martin and Bass were killed en route to Arkansas and he was going to retrieve their bodies (March 23, 1863). These letters also mention rumors that Grant abandoned Vicksburg and returned to Memphis (April 15, 1863) and that General Hooker crossed the Rappahannock only to be driven back by General Lee with the reported loss of 10,000 men (May 9, 1863). Correspondence from Edward Gay to Col. Handlock requests that a chest of carpenter tools, which had been taken by Union troops, be returned to him. (April 23, 1863).

A document giving the name of a soldier, John Garner, in Company G, 87 Regiment, U.S. Colored Infantry, also gives the name of his lieutenant and states that he enlisted in New Orleans for three years and was killed at Port Hudson (undated).

Box 46: February 1864-June 1864

Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, account listings, and invoices. Business correspondence to Edward J. Gay from various merchants, planters, and associates regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, cotton, and other goods.

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from his friends and family provides family news or news about the ongoing U.S. Civil War. An oath of loyalty signed by Edward Gay states he is loyal to the U.S. Government and that he recognizes the proclamation of the President (February 22, 1864). Correspondence from William Gay mentions that scarlet fever has hit the Gay family but he is glad to learn that all of Edwards Gay‟s children are improving (March 26, 1864). An arms permit given to Edward Gay by the provost marshal allows him to have a shotgun and revolver for three months for self defense and hunting (April 27, 1864), while two sets of orders from Headquarters, Defenses of Plaquemine, instruct Gay to send six men to work on defenses under construction at the mouth of Bayou Plaquemine (May 14, June 10, 1864). Multiple marriage certificates for freedmen working on Gay‟s plantation are signed by the Provost Marshal (June 7, June 11, 1864).

Box 47: July 1864-June 1865

This box contains financial documents such as account currents, bills of lading, receipts, and invoices related to the business conducted by or related to Edward Gay.

Business correspondence to or from Edward Gay concerning the production, transportation and selling/purchasing of sugar, molasses, cotton, and other goods. Orders from Headquarters in Plaquemine inform Edward Gay that the ox team he sent has not arrived (August 10-14, 1864), and request provisions of food or services from Gay (September 2-October 22, 1864). Also included is a certificate stating that Edward Gay has furnished labor to the Union and that he is a loyal citizen of the U.S. and his plantation and property are not to be disturbed by any officer of the government unless by specific orders from Headquarters Department of Gulf (September 22, 1864). William McPherson writes from New York about his efforts in Washington, D.C. to ensure that Edward Gay can safely purchase and ship cotton without fear of its confiscation by U.S. forces (October 25, 1864). Orders from the Bureau of Free Labor, Department of the Gulf to Edward Gay instruct him to pay the wages of his former slaves who had been conscripted to work for the Union (December 12, 1864). A list of lost time for freedmen laborers gives the names of workers and sums paid for the month (February 13, 1865), while a scanned copy of a contract for labor drawn up by Gay sets the terms of employment for his former slaves, such as wages, the use of wood, the stated amount of land for personal use, and the consequences of stealing, breaking a contract, or damaging farm tools (February 20, 1865).

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from family and friends gives family and community news. Correspondence from William Gay to his brother Edward Gay mentions Col. Shelby‟s raid into Missouri. He tells of rumors that Shelby has 5,000-10,000 men and that the state militia has been called out and mentions that Confederate troops are in the vicinity of Pilot Knob (September 27, 1864). Letters to Sophie Gay and Lavinia Gay from Samuel Mathews are written from the Union prison Johnson‟s Island (November- December 1864). In letters to Edward Gay, his son Andrew, a prisoner on Ship Island, Miss., asks for boots and an overcoat and states that he is in good health and can receive letters and money (December 16, 1864). Alcie Garinnie, a Confederate prisoner held at Camp Douglas near Chicago, Ill., asks Edward Gay to send $100 ensuring he will be repaid by Adonis Petit, a planter in Iberville, La. (January 21, 1865). Note to Edward Gay from Col. W. O. Lishe, commander of the Federal post in Donaldsonville, asking if he knows Augusta Petit, a Confederate Soldier whom he had captured (May 1, 1865). A letter written in French mentions the return of soldiers and the surrender of Gen. Lee (May 12, 1865).

Box 48: July 1865-Aprl 1866

Personal correspondence addressed to Edward J. Gay from family members and friends that discusses family, local, and national news and events. A letter of introduction for Sophie Gay and Mary J. McCreery addressed to Hon. John Bigelow, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the court of the French Emperor Napoleon III (December 14, 1865). Financial documents such as promissory notes, account listings, receipts, and bills of lading. Federal tax receipt for Edward Gay shows he was taxed for 3,062 acres (December 1865). Business correspondence addressed to Edward J. Gay from various merchants regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other goods. Letter from Edward Gay to Thomas W. Conway of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, in which Edward Gay states that he has a number of elderly and infirmed persons living on his plantation who, if removed, would be of expense to the government. He asks that his claim for a proper allowance be granted for keeping the infirmed persons and states that he has made a list of the people to facilitate the provost marshal when he comes to investigate the claim (September 18, 1865). A note states that 2nd Lieutenant George L. Gaskill of the 11th U.S. Artillery has a horse belonging to Robert S. Gaskill who gives permission for Lt. Gaskill to sell the horse. On the back is a receipt of payment by Edward Gay for the purchase of the horse (September 14, 1865). A list of wages paid by Edward Gay for work in November 1865 on the Back Place Plantation gives the names of laborers, wages per month, time lost and time earned, and amount paid to each worker (undated).

Box 49: May 1866-December 1866

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay and Lavinia Gay from various family members and friends. Correspondence from Mary Gay to her mother Lavinia Gay mentions that some of the people on the plantation have smallpox and that cholera is very bad in New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and St. Louis (June 20, 1866). Edward J. Gay‟s notarized and sworn statement of loyalty to the U.S. Constitution (November 29, 1866) and full pardon by Andrew Johnson are also included (December 24, 1866).

Business correspondence between Edward Gay and various merchants regarding the production, transportation, and sale of sugar, cotton, and other goods. Letters from Martin Howell in Nashville, Tenn. concern Edward Gay‟s sale of the estate of J. B. Craighead (May 1866). Special Orders No. 24 by the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands settles a labor dispute between Edward Gay and Albert Stephens deciding Stephens (a freedman on Gay‟s plantation) was not guilty of breaking his labor contract (May 28, 1866). A physical description of Tanglewood Plantation is included (October 2, 1866), as well as business correspondence from Roman Daigre mentioning that freedmen laborers are not signing contracts but instead want to work on shares of the crop (December 10, 1866).

Financial documents such as receipts, promissory notes, invoices, and account lists. U.S. Internal Revenue Annual Taxes give a detailed statement of income, gains, and profits of Edward Gay for 1865 (May 1, 1866). Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands receipts from multiple months show taxes paid by Gay as the result of the 5% tax imposed to fund schools (May 29, 1866). Lists show the amount of wages earned by the hands on Elvinia Plantation from May-December 1866.

Box 50: January 1867-April 1867

Contains business correspondence to Edward Gay from various merchants regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other goods. Correspondence to Edward Gay from his overseer/manager states that young Kleinpeter approached him to offer the sale of the lands of his father for $2 an acre (January 3, 1867). Several notes from the House Committee of Ways and Means addressed to Edward Gay and signed by John Hogan mention that any reduction of the duty on foreign sugar is not likely (January 16, 1867). He says the Committee has agreed to exempt cane sugar from the internal tax, but the bill still needs to pass Congress (January 29, 1867), and that he did his best to get a bill with a 1 cent tax on sugar and no tax on molasses (February 11, 1867). Personal correspondence from Andrew Gay to his father Edward Gay speaks of the trouble of finding field hands in the eastern U.S. for the plantation because they are afraid to be sold back into slavery in the south (February 1, 1867). U.S. Order for Transportation shows the transportation of 107 adults and 16 children, all defined as destitute freedmen, will be paid by the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen & Abandoned Lands, and provides a list of the different railroads that will be used to get the people from Charlotte, N.C. to Plaquemine, La. (March 7, 1867). Correspondence to Edward Gay from Roman Daigre mentions that a crevasse is spreading, leaving only four acres of dry land, and he expects to be inundated within 48 hours (April 5, 1867).

Personal correspondence and telegraph dispatches to Edward and Lavinia Gay from various family members, including a letter from P. A. Crow asking for their daughter Sophie‟s hand in marriage (March 8, 1867). Also included are detailed expenses of N. G. Pearson acquiring 27 freedmen laborers from Virginia for Edward Gay (March 24, 1867) and a letter from Isaac Erwin to Gay stating that now is the time to buy land as water levels are the highest the area has seen since 1828 (April 15, 1867).

Financial documents such as promissory notes, bills of lading, insurance policies, and account lists showing business activity. Lists show wages paid to laborers from April-December 1866 and for the months of January, February, and April 1867.

Box 51: May 1867-August 1867

Financial documents, such as bills of lading, receipts, invoices, account sheets and promissory notes. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations. Judgment of the case R. C. Dows vs. Jenou and Harry, two freedmen (May 18, 1867). Business correspondence to Edward Gay from various merchants regarding the production, sale, and transportation of sugar, molasses, and other goods. In a business letter to Edward Gay, C. H. Myhand discusses strategies of how to work plantation hands (July 7, 1867). Correspondence written to Edward Gay from William McPherson in which McPherson speaks about the possibility of the federal government confiscating land to give to freedmen (July 11, 1887).

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members and friends. Oaths of loyalty signed by Edward Gay that confirm him as an elector of Iberville Parish (May 9, 1867).

Box 52: September 1867-December 1867, undated

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the production, transportation, and sale of sugar, molasses, cotton or other goods at market or speaking on financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations.

A letter to Edward Gay from Thomas Garrett in Rosedale, La. mentions that five cases of yellow fever have appeared (September 29, 1867). Letters from Andrew Gay at St. Louis Plantation in La. to Edward Gay mention that the levees are caving in on the river both above and below the plantation (October 2, 1867) and that yellow fever has made an appearance in Plaquemine (October 4, 1867). He also informs his father there is no sickness on the plantation and that the fever seems to be of a light type (October 6, 1867). Subsequent letters to Gay discuss the yellow fever outbreak in Plaquemine and report one or two deaths (October 20-November 6, 1867). Letter of protest to the United States Internal Revenue from Edward Gay on the taxation of his sugar (November 10, 1867). T. F. Mitchell writes to Gay from Washington, La. of his fear that freedmen are planning an insurrection and that they have been drilling and marching in preparation (December 26, 1867).

Box 53: January 1868-March 1868

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Much of the business correspondence concerns Edward Gay‟s acquisition of plantations by assuming deeds or mortgages after the property owners default on their debts. Correspondence to Edward Gay mentions Magnolia Mound Plantation. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations.

The details and terms of a business partnership between Edward Gay and Roman Daigre (January 16, 1868). A letter from Lieutenant Colonel Mitchell of the Headquarters, Fifth Military District, Office of the Secretary for Civil Affairs to Edward Gay informs him that the oath he swore to become a member of the levee board was not valid (January 17, 1868), while Gay‟s reply to this letter explains his views on the oath (February 1, 1868). A letter to Edward Gay from Charles Merrill, an agent of the Bureau of Freedmen, Refugees, and Abandoned Land, reports that freedmen on Live Oak Plantation have not received pay, and he orders Gay to pay them immediately (February 24, 1868). C. H. Dickinson writes from Live Oak Plantation explaining that most of the freedmen wages were paid in the form of food and

supplies (February 25, 1868). Gervais Ichilater writes Gay from Baton Rouge informing him that a convict has escaped because the officer in charge did not keep his men under proper discipline (February 25, 1868). A letter from Headquarters, Fifth Military District, New Orleans to Edward Gay informs him that Major General Hancock has recognized the endorsement of the Commanding Officer at Baton Rouge regarding the complaint against the discipline of the men. (March 8, 1868). A copy of the endorsement from the Commanding Officer Post of Baton Rouge is included (March 8, 1868). Correspondence from the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands to Edward Gay instructs him to forward the money owed freedmen for work on Edgefield and Tilsit Plantations. (March 14, 1868).

Box 54: April 1868-May 1868

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concern the production, transportation, and sale of sugar, molasses, cotton or other goods at market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Much of the business correspondence concerns Edward Gay‟s acquisition of plantations by assuming deeds or mortgages after the property owners default on their debts. Correspondence addressed to Edward Gay mentions Magnolia Mound Plantation. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations.

William Edwards, Gay‟s merchant in New Orleans, writes asking if Gay is interested in buying him out and taking over the business (April 3, 1868). Correspondence from William Gay to Edward Gay mentions the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson and how its outcome could affect life in the south (April 5, 1868). A letter from Charles Merrill of the Freedmen‟s Bureau to Edward Gay concerns a labor dispute between Gay‟s overseer and a freedman laborer (April 30, 1868).

Box 55: June 1868-August 1868

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concern the sale of goods at market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Many letters concern the dispute related to the dissolution of the firm W. Edwards & Co. Correspondence addressed to Edward Gay mentions Magnolia Mound Plantation. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations.

A letter from A.D. Lytle to J.S. Tuttle instructing him to deliver a package of photographs to Mrs. Edward Gay (June 2, 1868). Newspaper clipping announcing the sale of land seized in the court case Edward J. Gay vs. Azema Broussard as well as the receipt for the newspaper advertisement paid by Edward Gay (June 27, 1868). A letter from the firm of Gay & Hanenkamp to Edward Gay that speaks of costs associated with having goods hauled by the teamsters (July 8, 1868). A receipt from the Office of the Board of Levee Commissioners that shows that the levee board is in debt to Edward Gay for some levee work he funded. A memorandum that explains the dissolution of the firm of William Edwards & Co. (July 23, 1868). Two letters from William Edwards concern a dispute with Gay about Edwards leaving New Orleans and retiring from his business (July 24, 1868). A letter to Edward Gay that gives details of a cattle drive in Louisiana (August 7, 1868).

Box 56: September 1868-November 1868

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale of goods at market or

financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Many letters concern the dispute related to the dissolution of W. Edwards & Co. or include memoranda from Edward J. Gay & Co. giving updates on business and the pending lawsuits between Edward Gay and William Edwards. Correspondence addressed to Edward Gay mentions Magnolia Mound Plantation. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations.

A letter from Edward Gay to William Edwards that explains his motives in his pending lawsuit related to the dissolution of the firm William Edwards & Co. (September 30, 1868). A business letter from E. J. Gay & Co. mentions the activities of Jewish merchants in New Orleans and expresses anti-Semitic attitudes towards their activities (September 24, 1868). Certificate showing Edward Gay has been registered as a qualified elector for Iberville Parish, La. (October 15, 1868). A business letter from Edward J. Gay & Co. mentions an ongoing insurrection in Cuba against Spanish rule led by Creoles pushing for emancipation (October 24, 1868). Letter from J. Carisius to Edward Gay that explains a new process for extracting sugar from sugar cane called diffusion (October 26, 1868). A letter from William Gay to Edward Gay mentions that Grant has been elected president and that the country has gone radical, but “negro suffrage” has been killed (November 4, 1868).

Box 57: December 1868-February 1869

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Correspondence addressed to Edward Gay mentions Magnolia Mound plantation. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations. Letters address labor difficulties regarding the actions of the laborers or obtaining seasonal contracts with the laborers. Letters concerning the dissolution of the firm W. Edwards & Co provide updates on the pending lawsuits between Edward Gay and William Edwards.

A letter from A. J. McCreery to Edward Gay in which he explains his plans to build and operate a meat freezer goes into some detail of the refrigeration process (December 2, 1868). A letter from Samuel Cranwill to Edward Gay mentions flooding due to crevasses and that Governor Kellogg has authorized the use of state funds to prevent more from forming. (January 1869). Letter from William Gay to Edward Gay mentions that the agreement between Gay and Edwards has been finalized and that the suit has been dropped (January 7, 1869). A letter discusses the Ten Years‟ War in Cuba and its effect on the sugar market (February 16, 1869). A letter mentions that pork received to feed the hands is rancid and that the hands will buy their own meat until better pork is sent (February 29, 1869). Agreement and terms of the sale of Oaks Plantation in West Baton Rouge to William Gay by Edward Gay (February 23, 2008).

Box 58: March 1869-April 1869

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Correspondence addressed to Edward Gay mentions Magnolia Mound plantation. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations.

Letters to Edward Gay from Edward Gay & Co. that mention that the news from Cuba is ambiguous and it is unclear how it will affect the market (March 8, 1869), and also provide news from Cuba that

insurgents are burning plantations and destroying sugar, but the demand for sugar in Havana has advanced. He also mentions that the U.S. may annex Cuba and how that would affect the balance of power, particularly in reference to England and France (March 20-April 10, 1869). A letter of recommendation from the Danish Emigrant Agency to Edward Gay recommends William Christiansen for work on Gay‟s plantation (April 11, 2008).

Box 59: May 1869-August 1869

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Correspondence addressed to Edward Gay mentions Magnolia Mound Plantation. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations.

A letter from Roman Daigre to Edward Gay who writes that Bayou Grosse Tete has breached the levee, but he will keep the pumps running and hopes to stay dry (May 18, 1869). Letter to Edward Gay from Edward Gay & Co. that expresses concern the money market will be negatively affected by the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury locking up “greenbacks” (June 23, 1869). A document from the Parish of Iberville Police Jury that appoints Edward Gay inspector for the parish‟s roads and levees (June 10, 1869). Business letter to Edward Gay from Edward Gay & Co. that states that the cotton crop of 1869-70 is three million bales (August 20, 1869). A letter to Edward Gay from Rev J. C. Keener that speaks of going up to Jackson, La. to inspect the conditions of Centenary College buildings for repairs (August 28, 1869).

Box 60: September 1869-November 1869

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Correspondence addressed to Edward Gay mentions Magnolia Mound Plantation. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations.

A letter from Edward J. Gay & Co. to Edward J. Gay that states that the cotton market has been affected by early buying of cotton due to the rumor that the year‟s yield would be three million bales (October 12, 1869). A letter from William Gay to Edward Gay informs him of their mother‟s death (October 14, 1869). A letter from Lavinia Gay to her son John that mentions the Louisiana State Seminary at Alexandria has burned, but the school has obtained the asylum at Baton Rouge and will move there within a month (October 29, 1869). A letter from P. A. Crow to Edward Gay that mentions the riverboat Stonewall burning and sinking (October 29, 1869).

Box 61: December 1869-January 1870

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations.

Letter of introduction for John H. Gay written by his father and sent to Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant in Washington, D.C. (December 13, 1869). A letter from Edward J. Gay & Co. to Edward Gay discusses how an agent “buys” hands in Virginia and delivers them to plantations looking for labor (December 14 1869, January 6, 1870). A letter to Gay from E. F. Wieslow, president of the St. Louis and South Eastern Rail Road, that mentions the construction of a rail line through Gay‟s Missouri land (December 24, 1869).

Box 62: February 1870-March 1870

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations.

A letter from J. Alexander to Edward Gay that speaks of building a rail line across some of Gay‟s Missouri land (February 3, 1870). A letter to Edward Gay from W. H. Glasgow speaks of the Cuban revolt coming to an end. He mentions there are cheap plantations as well as money to be made from selling slaves if emancipation occurs slowly (February 3, 1870). A letter from Edward Gay, Jr. to his brother John relates a story from Venice, Ill. in which several accused horse thieves were taken from jail by a mob and one African-American man was killed and thrown into the Mississippi River and another beaten badly. Afterwards, both were found to be innocent. The letter goes on to mention a train wreck on the Mississippi Central line caused by a bridge collapsing, and resulting in 21 deaths (February 27, 1870). A letter from W. Glasgow to Edward Gay that mentions that their friend Mr. Fales is having trouble finding a buyer for his slaves in Cuba, but the price for slaves is rising (March 6, 1870).

Box 63: April 1870-June 1870

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations. A letter from P. A. Crow to Edward Gay that mentions that the people of St. Louis are using the railroad to attend women‟s rights camps, Masonic and Templers camps (June 13, 1870). A letter from Roman Daigre to Edward Gay mentions that his Virginia hands are sickly and need flannel for clothing (June 19, 1870).

Box 64: July 1870-September 1870

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerns family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Numerous accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or amounts charged for food and clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations.

A letter from Samuel Cranwill to Edward Gay that mentions that the markets in the U.S. have been disrupted by news from Europe of Napoleon III and Bismarck taking steps toward the Franco-Prussian War (July 13- 20, 1870, September 3, 1870). A letter from Rev. J. C. Keaner to Edward Gay along with a copy of a letter from D. C. Hardee to Keaner that gives an update on the restoration work at Centenary College (August 18, 1870). Letter from Samuel Cranwill to Edward Gay that mentions that yellow fever is present in New Orleans and gives details of the quarantine and the number of deaths reported (August 30-September 19, 1870).

Included are several letters to Edward Gay concerning the use of Chinese laborers on the plantations. The letters state how Chinese laborers compare to African-American laborers and include information on rations of the Chinese laborers, views concerning their reliability, and how the climate affects them. Letters are written from agents of the Chinese laborers in New Orleans and from William Gay who was sent to San Francisco to strike a labor deal with agents of that city (September 7-26, 1870).

Box 65: October 1870-November 1870

Included is personal correspondence among various Gay family members, financial documents concerning the businesses of Edward Gay and family and documents related to the laborers on Edward Gay‟s plantations. A letter from William Gay in San Francisco to Edward Gay describes his ongoing quest to obtain Chinese laborers and the possibility of having some transported from China to New Orleans (October 3-7, 1870). A letter from Edward Gay, Jr. to his father mentions news that General Lee has had a stroke and cannot speak (October 3-9, 1870), while a subsequent letter from Samuel Cranwill mentions that General Lee has died (October 13, 1870). Another letter from Cranwill to Gay mentions how the Franco-Prussian War has affected world sugar production and demand (October 11, 1870). L. L. Butler writes from Chicago, Ill. to Edward Gay that he has contracted with 35 Scandinavian and German laborers to come to Louisiana and work on the plantations (October 15, 1870).

Box 66: December 1870-January 1871

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Accounts showing wages paid to the laborer, days worked by each laborer, or the amounts charged for food or clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantations. Of note is a release of right of way for railroad construction across part of Gay‟s Illinois land (January 1871).

Box 67: February 1871-March 1871

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Accounts showing wages, the days worked by each laborer, or the amounts charged for food or clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantation. Mrs. Haile writes to Edward Gay asking him to certify she did not aid the Confederacy during the Civil War (February 2, 1870). Letter from William Gay to Edward Gay that mentions how the Chinese laborers are performing as well as states that they have started a Sunday school for them and that they will have a 3-day holiday for the Chinese New Year (February 13, 1871). A letter from Mary Gay to her brother John Gay describes Mardi Gras activities in New Orleans (March 9, 1871).

Box 68: April 1871-May 1871

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or the amounts charged for food or clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantation. Documents related to Edward Gay‟s lawsuit against the Chinese laborers who have left before their contract was completed (April 26, 1871)

Box 69: May 1871-August 1871

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or the amounts charged for food or clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantation. Letters from Samuel Cranwill to Edward Gay mention several crevasses due to heavy rains and high water on the Mississippi River (May 29, 1871) and that the rear of New Orleans is flooded, especially beyond Claiborne Avenue (June 5, 1871). A letter to Cranwill from A. Jerry mentions he has contracted with several “white men” to work on Gay‟s plantation and that he must build new quarters for these men as they will not want to live among the African-American laborers (July 24, 1871). A letter from Cranwill to Gay discusses importing Chinese labor to work on the plantations (August 11, 1871). He mentions that the heads of the various railroads in Louisiana are beginning to control the direction of the Louisiana Levee Company and that the levees will now be managed by qualified men (August 26, 1871). Cranwill also writes that he has spoken with General T. Sherman, now chairman of the board of the Louisiana Levee Company, who informed him that work is to begin on repairing the levees (August 31, 1871).

Box 70: September 1871-October 1871

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or the amounts charged for food or clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantation. A letter from Samuel Cranwill to Edward Gay mentions that some ironwork is delayed due to a strike (September 18, 1871). A number of letters from William Gay to Edward Gay describe the Great Chicago Fire (October 10-21, 1871).

Box 71: November 1871-December 1871

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Accounts showing wages, days worked by each laborer, or the amounts charged for food or clothing on Edward Gay‟s plantation. A list details the work needed on the levees and includes local planters who have agreed to fund the work (November 6, 1871). A letter from J.B. Loud to Edward Gay stating that the school board for Iberville Parish has decided to re-establish the public school in the old school building on Edward Gay‟s property and asks his permission to use the building (December 8, 1871). A letter from the Office Board of State Engineers informs Gay that his bid has been accepted and that work can begin on the Evergreen Levee (December 14, 1871).

Box 72: January 1872-March 1872

Personal correspondence to Edward Gay from various family members concerning family news. Financial documents such as bills of lading, receipts, promissory notes, invoices, account sheets, and deeds of mortgage. Business letters to or from Edward Gay concerning the sale, production or transportation of goods to market or financial matters such as debts, mortgages, or investment opportunities. Labor documents such as contracts, receipts for wages paid, and lists showing time worked by laborers.

Box 73: March 1872-May 1872

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing supplies, animal feed, crops, pork, payments, shipments, and placing orders. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies from New Orleans to St. Louis aboard steamers such as the W.S. Pike, India, and Bismarck. Business letters to Edward J. Gay come from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his son-in-law P.A. Crow at Gay Villa, and his brother William T. Gay of Gay & Hanenkamp in St. Louis. These discuss accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, the sugar trade, and local business news. Letters from Gay‟s son, Edward J. Gay, Jr. discuss work at Allendale Plantation and his disgruntled workers, and a letter from Cranwill informs him that his son took seven hands to Allendale to replace his workers who left (April 16, 1872). Correspondence from G. Bredow and a memorandum compiled from the books of the late firm of William Edwards & Co. discuss an effort to obtain documents for the Patrick Estate case (April 12, May 25, 1872). Also included is a list of amounts brought forward between Edward J. Gay and a number of Chinese workers (April 26, 1872).

Correspondence is comprised mostly of family letters relaying news. A number of letters are written to John H. Gay at Washington & Lee University in Virginia, including a letter from his mother Lavinia on his 19th birthday. In it, she tells of family news and her husband‟s leaving for St. Louis to visit Col. E.G.W. Butler (March 20, 1872). Another letter to John from his mother asks about his studies and his recent trip to Baltimore and tells of his sister Susan‟s newborn boy, Edward Gay Butler (April 27, 1872), and a letter from G.W.C. Lee at Washington & Lee informs Gay that his son J.H. Gay left the university without his father‟s permission and that the university is sorry to see him leave (May 15, 1872). Finally, a letter to Edward J. Gay from his father John Henderson Gay talks of their old home, family members, and the state of his business (May 26, 1872)

Box 74: June-August 1872

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing supplies, animal feed, crops, pork, payments, shipments, labor, and placing orders. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies from New Orleans to St. Louis aboard steamers such as the W.S. Pike, India, and Bismarck. Business letters to Edward J. Gay come from his partner Samuel Cranwill discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. One letter between the two discusses the price of coal (June 7, 1872) and others mention the advertisement of the sale of Allendale Plantation (June 10-27, 1872). Letters to Edward J. Gay, and later to Edward J. Gay, Jr., from Gay & Hanenkamp and from L.L. Butler discuss the status of their crops, news of family members, and happenings on their plantations. Letters to Gay from Roman Daigre and Thomas Garrett both report cases of charbon in their mules and discuss supplies and funds needed to take care of the disease. Other business letters include one from Jeremiah Supple accepting Gay‟s offer to become possessor of Theresa Plantation in Bayou Goula (June 29, 1872), letters from L.C. Manning discussing the inheritance and care of the child Stonewall Pearson (July 10, August 20, 1872), and a letter to Andrew Gay at St. Louis Plantation from Charles Robach offering immigrants arriving from Europe to work on his plantation (July 21, 1872). Also included is an inventory of the estate of Dr. Jesse Patrick (June 3, 1872) and a newspaper clipping from the Sugar Planter of a notice written by L.L. Butler concerning the J.C. Patrick estate case (August 3, 1872).

Family correspondence includes a letter from P.A. Crow at Gay Villa discussing the planting of vineyards, unusual rains, the health of Sophie, and expenses at Gay Villa (June 2-July 25, 1872), a letter from Andrew H. Gay at Ridgefield to his father discussing crops, the health of his family, and various business propositions (July 26, 1872), and letters to Edward J. Gay from his son Edward J. Gay, Jr. discussing crops, sales of cotton and sugar, family news, and his fear that the cotton crop will be affected by a drought (August 23, 1872). A letter to John H. Gay from Edward J. Gay, Jr. inquires about news

from St. Louis, about the railroad that was to be built near Gay Villa, and the purchase of Forest Park by the city and their plans for it. He also describes Grand Isle to his brother and mentions his desire to possibly travel there soon (August 25, 1872).

Box 75: September-November 1872

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing supplies, animal feed, crops, pork, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the W.S. Pike, Lessie Taylor, Henry Tete, St. John, Charles Bodmann , and Bismarck. Business letters to Edward J. Gay come from his partner Samuel Cranwill and his son Edward J. Gay, Jr. discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town, and from his son-in-law L.L. Butler discussing crops, equipment, and labor on St. Louis Plantation as well as the drought in Louisiana (September 2, 8, 19, 1872) and a yellow fever outbreak in St. Louis (September 20, 1872). Other correspondence includes a letter from A.A. Thomas requesting money to develop land in Lafayette Parish (September 2, 1872), a letter from D.F. Boyd at Louisiana State University asking for money (November 11, 1872), and letters from A. Ferry in St. James Parish explaining why he does not have enough money to pay his merchants (September 12, October 2, 1872). Also included is an agreement of co-partnership of Edward J. Gay, William T. Gay, Richard P. Hanenkamp, and L.L. Butler (September 26, 1872) and a procuration of land of William T. Gay to Edward J. Gay (November 15, 1872).

Family correspondence includes a letter to Edward J. Gay from his son Andrew at Ridgefield Plantation discussing his plan to visit them in St. Louis, the drought affecting the crop of sugar cane, news of Sue and Major L.L. Butler, and the health of his wife Mary (September 1, September 17, 1872). Letters from Edward J. Gay, Jr. to his father discuss the state of plantations and crops in Teche country and news of the people he visited on his way to New Iberia. He also discusses the price of sugar cane and the crop this year (September 11, 1872), his arrival in St. Louis and news of friends, and his attendance of the St. Louis Fair (October 7, 1872). Letters from Edward J. Gay, Jr. to his cousin Will discuss politics in Europe (November 25, 1872), and letters to his mother discuss Governor Warmoth and news from Louisiana (November 27, 1872).

Box 76: December 1872-January 1873

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing supplies, animal feed, crops, pork, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the W.S. Pike, Lessie Taylor, Henry Tete, St. John, and Bismarck. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his son Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his son-in-law P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. A letter to Gay from Andrew at Augusta Plantation discusses the state of the plantation and informs him of a shipment of mules (undated). Other business correspondence includes letters of recommendation for managers and overseers (January 1-4, 1873) and a letter from the Department of Agriculture seeking opinions and information concerning the year‟s sugar cane crop (undated). Also included are letters to Gay from St. Louis architect C.B. Clarke concerning plans for the construction of a church (December 14, 1872) as well as architectural plans for the church (undated).

Box 77: February-March 1873

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing supplies, animal feed, crops, pork, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the W.S. Pike, Henry

Tete, St. John, Belle Lee, John Kyle, and Pauline Carroll. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his son Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his son-in-law P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. A letter from M.J. Fortier in New Orleans discusses the sale of Felicité Plantation (March 31, 1873) and a certificate of mortgage of Woodland Plantation belongs to S.D. Schwing (March 31, 1873). St. Louis architect also writes to Edward J. Gay discussing his plans for the construction of a church (February 18, 1873). Other business papers include a mortgage certificate of Gilbert A. Daigre (February 20, 1873), a sale of mules to Edward J. Gay (March 3, 1873), and a number of freight bills from the Baton Rouge, Grosse Tete, & Opelousas Railroad Co.

Box 78: April-June 1873

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, such as one for Mrs. L.P. Barrow of Pecan Plantation, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing supplies, animal feed, crops, pork, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Also included are payrolls for various plantations, including Woodland, Magnolia and Vaughan Plantations. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the W.S. Pike, Belle Lee, Henry Tete, St. John, Katie, and Henry Ames. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill and his son Edward J. Gay, Jr. discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Letters from E.T. Flanagan & Co. in St. Louis discuss Flanagan‟s inability to pay his debts to Gay and discuss other options to settle them (April 1, April 3, 1873). The obituary of Mary Dickinson Gay, wife of Andrew H. Gay, is also included (undated). Letters among Susan Gay Butler, her father Edward J. Gay, L.L. Butler, and P.A. Crow all describe a recent trip to Gay Villa and news of family and friends there (April 19-28, 1873). A letter from F.B. Erwin informs Gay that there is a cistern belonging to him at Shady Grove Plantation, which is now for sale (June 24, 1873), and Lavinia Gay writes to her husband from Gay Villa informing him of news and activities since his departure (June 23, June 28, 1873). Finally, a dance card from the Commencement Hop at Louisiana State University is included (June 26, 1873).

Box 79: July-September 1873

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, pork, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the W.S. Pike, Henry Tete, St. John, Selma, and Bismarck. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his son-in-law L.L. Butler discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. A letter from Samuel Cranwill remarks on the rumor that African-Americans will soon begin to attend schools and he questions what will become of labor on plantations (July 26), and another from Cranwill expresses his dislike of French Creoles (September 16, 1873). Letters among Edward J. Gay, L.L. Butler, and Cranwill show their anxiety surrounding a financial crash and problems with the banks (September 29-30, 1873). Also included are payrolls for various plantations, including Woodland, Keep, Magnolia and Vaughan Plantations, and a letter from Lavinia Gay in St. Louis to her husband in Louisiana updates him on news of the family and plantation and mentions the fear that cholera has come to St. Louis (July 6, 1873).

Box 80: October-November 1873

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, pork, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the W.S. Pike, St. John, John Kyle, B.L. Hodge, and Sabine. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel

Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Letters from P.A. Crow and Lavinia Gay talk of the fair in St. Louis and its success despite the prevalence of yellow fever in the area (October 10-13, 1873), and letters from Cranwill and Butler discuss the bank crisis in the country and how it will affect planting (October 16, 1873). Another letter from Cranwill discusses the U.S. government‟s course with Cuba and how this will affect trade (November 29, 1873). Also included are payrolls for various plantations, including Woodland, Magnolia and Vaughan Plantations.

Box 81: December 1873-January 1874

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, pork, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Lessie Taylor, Bismarck, Bart Able, B.L. Hodge, and Susie Silver. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. A letter from Cranwill discusses the new funding bill passed by the state legislature and his hope that it will bring much needed reform and aid to planters (January 27, 1874). A number of letters are written to Edward J. Gay applying for or recommending others for jobs as managers on his plantations, and letters are also written to Gay, many from Louis P. Kraft, about the “cemetery road issue” and concern a road being built through his land in Belleville, Illinois. Also included are payrolls for various plantations, including Oaks, Woodland, Pecan, Keep, Mulberry Grove, and Vaughan Plantations, as well as a memorandum of notes and payments for the purchase of Theresa Plantation. A letter from Sophie Crow to her father tells him of the family‟s Christmas and news from St. Louis (January 4, 1874).

Box 82: February-March, 1874

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the W.S. Pike, John Kyle, Henry C. Yaeger, B.L. Hodge, and St. John. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Pecan, Dunboyne, and Oaks Plantations. Also included is a letter from Mrs. Mary Dungan informing Edward Gay of how his ward, Stonewall “Wallie” Pearson, is doing and inquiring about his finances (February 9, 1874) and an invitation to a Mardi Gras ball to John Gay (February 17, 1874).

Box 83: April-May 1874

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the W.S. Pike, John Kyle, Henry C. Yaeger, B.L. Hodge, and St. John. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Keep, Pecan, Dunboyne, and Oaks Plantations. Also included is a letter from the Office of Board of State Engineers requesting people mark the level of water at its highest points along levees (April 4, 1874) and letters from Cranwill, Edward Gay, and others mention river levels rising above the high water mark of 1871 and breaches of

levees and flooding along the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers (April 7-30, 1874). These letters also discuss the worry of damages to crops, property, and livestock by the flooding. Subsequent letters discuss crops and property once the water has receded (May 1874) and others mention the building of new levees (May 25, 1874).

Box 84: June-July 13, 1874

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the W.S. Pike, John Kyle, Henry C. Yaeger, B.L. Hodge, and St. John. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Keep, Pecan, Dunboyne, and Oaks Plantations. Edward J. Gay, Jr. writes to inform his father of the death of his uncle, William Hynes, in London (June 27, 1874), and letters from Lavinia Gay, Edward J. Gay, Jr., and L.L. Butler write to Edward J. Gay to discuss Lavinia‟s trip to St. Louis (July 9, 1874).

Box 85: July 14-September 30, 1874

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Paragon, Mollie Moore, Henry C. Yaeger, Cherokee, and W.S. Pike. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his son-in-law L.L. Butler discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Keep, Pecan, Dunboyne, and Oaks Plantations. Also included are letters from Susan and L.L. Butler describing their trip to Green Bay and the health of their baby (August 1874), and a letter from A.J. Garrett who writes of his fear of an African-American uprising (August 12, 1874). Mary Dungan writes to Edward Gay again discussing financial support of his ward (August 17, September 29, 1874), L.L. Butler writes Edward Gay about his grandfather‟s will (September 25, 1874), and certificates show voting registration of Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay in Iberville Parish (September 4, September 30, 1874). In a letter to her husband, Lavinia Gay tells of her worry of the situation in New Orleans regarding the Battle of Liberty Place (September 17, 1874). A telegram from Sue Butler to her father informs him that their youngest boy died (September 1874).

Box 86: October 1-November 30, 1874

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Susie Silver, B.L. Hodge, Henry C. Yaeger, Cherokee, and W.S. Pike. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Keep, Pecan, Ridgefield, Dunboyne, and Oaks Plantations. In a letter to her husband, Lavinia Gay sends news from Gay Villa and tells of a recent letter from Edward J. Gay, Jr. who is recovering in Hot Springs, Arkansas (October 1, 1874). A letter to Samuel Crichlow from Edward J. Gay addresses the issue of striking laborers and the course they need to take to resolve it (October 7, 1874), while Edward J. Gay, Jr. writes to his father discussing recent national elections and expressing his joy of Democratic successes (November 8, 1874).

Box 87: December 1874-January 1875

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the B.L. Hodge, Henry C. Yaeger, and W.S. Pike. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. A number of letters from Samuel Cranwill concern Acadia and Home Place Plantations. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Greenfield, Magnolia, Pecan, Dunboyne, Vaughan, and Oaks Plantations. Also included are a price list of a cistern maker in New Orleans (ca. 1874), a list of places affected by flooding in 1874, and a labor contract for Kuneman Plantation (1875).

Box 88: February-April 1875

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Charles B. Church, B.L. Hodge, Henry C. Yaeger, and W.S. Pike. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. A number of letters from Samuel Cranwill concern Acadia and Home Place Plantations, including one in which he discusses the seizure of Acadia Plantation (March 18, 1875). Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Magnolia, Pecan, Dunboyne, and Oaks Plantations. Also included is a labor contract for workers on the Oaks Plantation (February 1, 1875) and a summons to court for the case of Winston Stuart v. Oaks Plantation (February 26, 1875). In a letter to Edward J. Gay, Mary Dungan writes of his ward and asks for money for his clothing (March 27, 1875).

Box 89: May-June 1875

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Notifications from the Tax Collector‟s Office sent to Edward J. Gay inform him of payments due for state and parish taxes (May 1, 1875). Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Great Republic, Glencoe, Belle of Shreveport, and W.S. Pike. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Magnolia, Pecan, and Dunboyne Plantations. Also included are legal documents relating to the property of the Patrick estate, letters announcing the birth of Lavinia Butler to Major and Susan Butler (May 30-31, 1875), and a letter from Lavinia Gay to her son in which she describes attending a performance by “Blind Tom” at the Mercantile Library Hall (June 13, 1875).

Box 90: July-August 1875

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the B.L. Hodge, James Howard, Henry C. Yaeger, and W.S. Pike. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and

P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Magnolia, Pecan, and Dunboyne Plantations. Also included is a letter from L.L. Butler announcing the death of his mother (July 2, 1875). A copy of a land sale pertains to property in Boston that was included in the Estate of William R. Hynes (July 9, 1875).

Box 91: September-October 1875

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Also included is J.H. Gay‟s tobacco license (October 1, 1875). Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the John F. Tolle, Lessie Taylor, and W.S. Pike. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Magnolia, Augusta, Pecan, and Dunboyne Plantations. A letter from Lavinia Gay to her husband mentions a hurricane hitting the Louisiana coast and inquires as to the damage to their crops (September 22, 1875). Also included is the sale of a house and lot in New York to Henry L. Hoguet from Lavinia Gay (October 27, 1875).

Box 92: November-December 1875

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the B.L. Hodge, Lessie Taylor, Thompson Dean, and W.S. Pike. Edward J. Gay, Jr. writes to his father and tells of a fire aboard the W.S. Pike in which they lost supplies (December 17, 1875). Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Also included are a number of labor contracts between Edward J. Gay and workers at the Oaks Plantation (December 1875). A number of letters and telegrams from family members concern the health of John Henderson Gay, father of Edward J. Gay. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Magnolia, Augusta, Oaks, Pecan, and Dunboyne Plantations. Some correspondence pertains to the sale of property in New York to Henry Hoguet (November 20-December 13, 1875), and letters to Edward J. Gay tell of the deaths of William T. Gay‟s children, Willie and Evey (December 6-11, 1875).

Box 93: January-February 1876

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the B.L. Hodge, Thompson Dean, and Lessie Taylor. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. A number of letters come from workers looking for employment on one of Gay‟s plantations. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Magnolia, Keep, and Dunboyne Plantations. Also included is a lease of a tract of land to Charles H. Dickinson from Edward J. Gay along Bayou Grosse Tete (January 1, 1876). Some correspondence pertains to the sale of property in New York to Henry Hoguet from Lavinia Gay.

Box 94: March-April 1876

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the B.L. Hodge, St. John, Lessie Taylor, and Governor Allen. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. A number of letters come from workers looking to find employment on one of Gay‟s plantations. Payrolls for Dunboyne Plantation and a medical account of laborers on St. Louis Plantation are included. Documents pertaining to the succession of Dr. J.C. Patrick, letters concerning the sale of property in New York to Henry Hoguet from Lavinia Gay (April 1876), and letters between Edward J. Gay and E.G.W. Butler concerning the rental of Dunboyne Plantation (March 1876) are also included. In a letter to Edward Gay, L.L. Butler discusses the state of his mother‟s will and its impact on the family (April 12, 1876).

Box 95: May-June 1876

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Glencoe, Bismarck, Governor Allen, and St. John. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. A number of letters come from workers looking to find employment on one of Gay‟s plantations, and some correspondence discusses decisions made by the levee board. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Keep, and Dunboyne Plantations. Family letters mention the upcoming marriage of Andrew H. Gay to Lodoiska Clement (May 1876), and the invitation to the wedding is included (June 1876). Again, letters concerning the sale of property in New York to Henry Hoguet from Lavinia Gay are included (June 1876).

Box 96: July-August 1876

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for supplies and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Ouachita Belle and St. John. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. One business letter comes from George Wilkins who discusses sugar and prospects in Cuba (August 1, 1876), and a number of letters come from workers looking to find employment on one of Gay‟s plantations. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Woodland, Keep, and Dunboyne Plantations. Also included is a handwritten note by Edward J. Gay describing the cure for charbon.

Box 97: September-October 25, 1876

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Ouachita Belle, Governor Allen, and St. John. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and

P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. A number of letters come from workers looking to find employment on one of Gay‟s plantations. Payrolls for various plantations include Kuneman and Dunboyne Plantations. In a letter to Edward J. Gay, E.G.W. Butler discusses the upcoming election and speculates how various states will vote (September 6, 1876). Also included is the voting registration of D.C. Hubbard of Iberville Parish (September 6, 1876), as well as a letter from Hubbard in which he talks of a function given by the Democratic Conservative party where Generals Nicholls and Ogden were speakers (September 16, 1876). Henry R. Slack writes to Edward Gay discussing the need to reexamine and update existing levees (September 27, 1876).

Box 98: October 26-December 24, 1876

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Lessie Taylor, Ashland, Governor Allen, and St. John. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Keep, Shady Grove, Kuneman, and Dunboyne Plantations. A letter from Lavinia Gay to her husband describes her trip to Philadelphia with her daughter, Sue (October 29, 1876). A number of letters discuss the upcoming election, including one from L.L. Butler in which he mentions unease in New Orleans due to issues involving ballot boxes (November 9, 1876).

Box 99: December 25, 1876-January 31, 1877

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Lessie Taylor, Ashland, Governor Allen, and St. John. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Keep, Woodland, Shady Grove, Oaks, Kuneman, and Dunboyne Plantations. Also included are plans for an 8-foot vacuum pan and other sugar purifying equipment, a letter from Leopold L. Lambert, E.S.S. Refinery in New York, entitled “Purification of Sugar,” and directions for making and using sulphurous acid (undated). Samuel Cranwill writes to Gay discussing rumors of the actions Governor Nicholls intends to take after his inauguration (January 5, 1877).

Box 100: February-March 1877

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Charles Morgan, Governor Allen, and St. John. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Shady Grove, Pecan, Oaks, Kuneman, and Dunboyne Plantations. In a letter to Edward J. Gay, E.G.W. Butler writes of the results of the 1876 election and his sentiments concerning it (March 14, 1877).

Box 101: April-May 11, 1877

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Centennial, Lessie Taylor, Governor Allen, and Henry C. Yaeger. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. A number of letters come from workers looking to find employment on one of Gay‟s plantations. Payrolls for various plantations include Pecan, Oaks, Kuneman, and Dunboyne Plantations. Also included is a broadside for Fairbanks‟ Scales (March 29, 1877), a list of measurements of part of the back levee at Oaks Plantation (April 21, 1877), and a deed for property in West Baton Rouge Parish (April 12, 1877). In a letter to Edward Gay, L.L. Butler mentions the great loss of life in the fire that burned the Southern Hotel in St. Louis (April 11, 1877). In another letter, E.G.W. Butler writes to Gay of his thoughts on President Hayes, a possible end to Reconstruction, and politics in Europe (April 23, 1877).

Box 102: May 12-July 13, 1877

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Henry C. Yaeger, Lessie Taylor, Governor Allen, and Golden Rule. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons Andrew and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Pecan, Oaks, Kuneman, and Dunboyne Plantations. In a letter to Edward J. Gay, L.L. Butler comments on Governor Nicholls‟ choices for Iberville parish police jurors (May 12, 1877). Also included is a survey of Seth John‟s Bayou, part of St. Louis Plantation (May 1877). A number of letters are written by John A. Balestier to Edward or Lavinia Gay concerning legal issues (June 1877), and a letter from L.L. Butler to Gay mentions the retirement of Samuel Cranwill (June 21, 1877).

Box 103: July 14-August 31, 1877

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Henry C. Yaeger, Lessie Taylor, Governor Allen, and Golden Rule. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his partner Samuel Cranwill, his sons John, Andrew, and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his son-in-law L.L. Butler discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Ridgefield, Pecan, Kuneman, and Dunboyne Plantations. In letters to her husband, Lavinia Gay announces the birth of a girl to Major and Sue Butler, and also writes of her anxiety concerning striking laborers in St. Louis and her fear of spreading unrest (July 26, August 1, 1877). In a letter to John Gay, his cousin Edward J. Glasgow, Jr. discusses the return of order in St. Louis (August 4, 1877), and Nannie Gay writes of Major Butler attending a meeting with his old military friends in order to discuss uniting forces in case of unrest (August 25, 1877).

Box 104: September-October 1877

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee,

payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Commonwealth, Lessie Taylor, Governor Allen, and H.F. Sharp, and a letter from L.L. Butler mentions the sinking of the Glencoe near Vicksburg (October 29, 1877). Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from Samuel Cranwill, his sons John, Andrew, and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his son-in-law L.L. Butler discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Pecan, Oaks, Kuneman, and Dunboyne Plantations. A number of letters mention storms throughout Louisiana which damaged sugar cane crops and property on a number of plantations (September 1877). A number of letters come from workers looking to find employment on one of Gay‟s plantations, including one letter from the Cooperative Employment Bureau seeking a reference for a former employee of Edward Gay (October 13, 1877).

Box 105: November 1-December 3, 1877

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Ouachita Belle, Mollie Moore, Governor Allen, and Thompson Dean. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from Samuel Cranwill, his sons John, Andrew, and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his sons-in-law L.L. Butler and P.A. Crow discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Pecan, Kuneman, and Dunboyne Plantations. Also included is an advertisement and letter describing The U.S. Biographical Encyclopedia: Missouri Volume in which Edward J. Gay is profiled (November 17, 1877).

Box 106: December 4-31, 1877

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Ouachita Belle, H.F. Sharp, Governor Allen, and John A. Scudder. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from Samuel Cranwill, his sons John, Andrew, and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his son-in-law L.L. Butler discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Pecan, Kuneman, and Dunboyne Plantations. Nannie and Sue write to their brother John congratulating him on his recent engagement to Rebecca “Nannie” Connor (December 5, 1877) and letters to Lavinia and Edward Gay from their lawyer, John A. Balestier, discuss the Estate of William R. Hynes (December 1877). Also included is a bill from Pinkerton‟s National Detective Agency (December 28, 1877).

Box 107: January-February 1878

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Ouachita Belle, H.F. Sharp, Governor Allen, and C.K. Peck. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from Samuel Cranwill, his sons John, Andrew, and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his son-in-law L.L. Butler discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Pecan, Shady Grove, Kuneman, and Dunboyne Plantations. Letters to Lavinia and Edward Gay from their lawyer, John A. Balestier, discuss the Estate of William R. Hynes (January 1878).

Box 108: March-April 1878

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Governor Allen. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his sons John, Andrew, and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his son-in-law L.L. Butler discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Pecan, Oaks, and Shady Grove Plantations. Documents and letters to Lavinia and Edward Gay from their lawyer, John A. Balestier, discuss the Estate of William R. Hynes (March-April 1878), and in a letter to his brother John, Edward J. Gay, Jr. talks of the family visiting New Orleans for Mardi Gras (March 1, 1878).

Box 109: May-July 1878

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, receipts from druggists, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing animal feed, crops, coffee, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Ouachita Belle, H.F. Sharp, and Governor Allen. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his sons John, Andrew, and Edward J. Gay, Jr., and his son-in-law L.L. Butler discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Payrolls for various plantations include Pecan and Oaks Plantations. Documents and letters to Lavinia and Edward Gay from their lawyer, John A. Balestier, discuss the Estate of William R. Hynes (May-July 1878), and legal documents concern a case between Andrew H. Gay and the Pacific Railway Company over the use of land (June-July 1878). A number of letters concern the Local Board of Swamp Land Commissions and its desire to build a canal connecting bayous around Thibodaux, La. (July 1878).

Box 110: August-November 1878

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for supplies and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing crops, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Commonwealth, Edward J. Gay, and Governor Allen. A number of the letters are written to John H. Gay discussing personal as well as business matters, but correspondence also includes Edward J. Gay, Andrew Gay, Edward J. Gay, Jr., and L.L. Butler. Payrolls for various plantations include Kuneman and Oaks Plantations. Letters among family members talk of the spread of yellow fever throughout the South, including one mentioning the quarantine of the steamer Pargoud (August 14, 1878). Included is a short biography of John Henderson Gay, Sr., father of Edward J. Gay, written by a family member the day after his death (September 9, 1878). Writing to one of his sons, Edward J. Gay tells of Edward Gay, Jr. coming down with yellow fever (September 16, 1878) and a telegram from Andrew H. Gay announces his death (September 19, 1878). Subsequent letters to family members send their condolences.

Box 111: December 1878-December 1880

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, tax receipts, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay discussing crops, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar, molasses, and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Ouachita Belle, Edward J. Gay, and Governor Allen. Business letters of Edward J. Gay are written to or from his sons John and Andrew discussing accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Also included are a payroll for Oaks Plantation, a list of property in St. Louis and Jefferson Counties belonging to Edward J. Gay (1878), and a sanitary certificate declaring Baton Rouge free of contagious diseases, thereby allowing John H. Gay to travel (August 7, 1880).

Box 112: January-October 1881

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay and John H. Gay discussing crops, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Edward J. Gay. The majority of business letters are written between John H. Gay, Jr. and his father Edward J. Gay, and discuss accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town, while other letters include L.L. Butler and Andrew Price, husband of Nannie Gay. A letter from Edward J. Gay to John discusses the gathering of family members in New Orleans for Mardi Gras (February 28, 1881). Also included is a plat of swamplands belonging to Edward J. Gay in Iberville Parish (February 1881) and a contract between Gay and the New Orleans Pacific Railroad Company (April 1, 1881).

Box 113: November 1881-March 1882

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay and John H. Gay discussing crops, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Whisper and Edward J. Gay. The majority of business letters are written between John H. Gay, Jr. and his father Edward J. Gay, and discuss accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town, while other letters include L.L. Butler and Andrew Price. Payrolls for various plantations include Pecan and Oaks Plantations. In a letter to John, Edward Gay mentions unease among African-Americans in West Feliciana Parish after incidents of violence (December 26, 1881) and a number of letters discuss flooding and the breach of levees along the Mississippi River (1882). Another letter from Edward J. Gay tells of the death of Susan Gay Butler (March 26, 1882) and subsequent letters contain condolences for the family. Broadsides for equipment used in brick-making and sugar refining are also included.

Box 114: April-August 1882

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay and John H. Gay discussing crops, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Whisper and Edward J. Gay. The majority of business letters are written between John H. Gay, Jr. and his father Edward J. Gay, and discuss accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town, while other letters include L.L. Butler and Andrew Price. Correspondence continues to address flooding and what is being done to recover crops and levees. Andrew and Lodo Gay also write, discussing the death of their young daughter from meningitis (July-August 1882).

Box 115: September 1882-March 1883

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay and John H. Gay discussing crops, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the City of New Orleans and Edward J. Gay. Business letters are written to or from John H. Gay, Jr., Andrew Gay, and their father Edward J. Gay, and discuss accounts for various plantations and farmers, payment of hands, and business news around town. Letters also include L.L. Butler and Andrew Price. A number of letters are written to Andrew Gay from his wife Lodoiska in Virginia. A plat shows swamp lands in Plaquemine (September 30, 1882). A payroll for Oaks Plantation is also included, as well as a rental agreement between Edward J. Gay and Leon Achée (February 10, 1883).

Box 116: April-December 1883

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay, John H. Gay, and Andrew Gay discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Natchez, City of New Orleans and Edward J. Gay. A letter to John Gay from a businessman in New Orleans discusses the science behind ideas and possibilities to replace the steam engine (May 12, 1883). Letters also include L.L. Butler and Andrew Price. Also included are plans for an unidentified brick building (June 27, 1883), a document resurveying and creating a boundary between land belonging to Oaks Plantation and land belonging to the New Orleans Pacific Railway Company (September 25, 1883), and statements of expenditures and monthly trial balances for Edward J. Gay and Co. Legal documents concern land in Kentucky connected to the Andrew Hynes Estate (October 25, 1883).

Box 117: January-June 1884

Business papers include a large amount of account sheets, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay, John H. Gay, and Andrew Gay discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the Natchez, City of New Orleans and Edward J. Gay. A letter to John Gay from a businessman in New Orleans discusses the science behind ideas and possibilities to replace the steam engine (May 12, 1883). Letters also include L.L. Butler and Andrew Price, including one to Price concerning congressional elections in 1882 in Iberia and surrounding parishes (January 6, 1884). A number of other letters discuss rising river levels, the danger of flooding, and precautions taken to prevent it (February-April 1884). A letter from Lavinia Gay mentions an outbreak of smallpox in Iberville Parish, especially among the African-American community (April 21, 1884) and family correspondence focuses on Rebecca and John Gay‟s trip to New Mexico and California for business and in an attempt to improve John‟s health (April-June 1884). Also included is an invitation to Mrs. John Gay to a Mardi Gras Ball hosted by the King‟s Komical Klan (February 1884).

Box 118: July-December 1884

Business papers include account sheets, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay, Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Shipping receipts involve the transport of sugar and supplies between New Orleans and St. Louis aboard steamers such as the John A. Scudder, City of New Orleans and Edward J. Gay. Family correspondence focuses on Rebecca and John Gay‟s trip to California and Oregon (July 1884) and a letter to Rebecca Gay from her brother tells of the political campaigns of Kellogg and Edward Gay in Terrebonne Parish (October 25, 1884). A letter to Edward Gay discusses the election in various parishes and his defeat of Kellogg (November 24, 1884). Charts showing numbers of registered voters in certain parishes, reports on polling places, and statements of witnesses to the election are also included (undated).

Box 119: January-December 1885

Business papers include account sheets, insurance documents, bills for farm machinery, supplies, and groceries, and letters to Edward J. Gay, John Gay, Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Political correspondence involves Edward J. Gay and discusses issues such as sugar prices, tariffs, and political appointments, including letters from Senator R.L. Gibson. Other documents concern Kellogg‟s contesting the results of the election of 1884 (January 1885). A letter to Edward J. Gay from his daughter-in-law expresses her fear that his plantations are being neglected in his absence (June 3, 1885). Also included is an annual report of receipts and expenditures for Edward J. Gay‟s real estate for 1885.

Box 120: January-December 1886

Business papers include account sheets, insurance documents, bills for farm machinery and supplies, and letters to Edward J. Gay, John Gay, Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Political correspondence involves Edward J. Gay and discusses issues such as sugar prices, tariffs, farmland in Louisiana, and political appointments, including letters from Senator R.L. Gibson and John McEnery. One letter discusses the creation of weather stations throughout Louisiana, observing especially the sugar and rice regions of the state (January 12, 1886), a number of letters congratulate him on his reelection (November 1886), and a letter discusses the will of the late governor, Michael Hahn (December 8, 1886). Family correspondence discusses difficulty travelling in Louisiana due to rains and flooding (April 1886) and a letter to Edward J. Gay, John Shields expresses his concern for the well-being of William Gay (November 17, 1886).

Box 121: January-June 1887

Business papers include account sheets, insurance documents, bills for farm machinery and supplies, and letters to Edward J. Gay, John Gay, Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. A letter from his former ward, Stonewall Pierson, asks Edward Gay‟s advice as to land in California (January 31, 1887). Political correspondence involves Edward J. Gay and discusses issues such as sugar prices, protective tariffs, extensions of railroads, farmland in Louisiana, and political appointments. A number of letters deal with appropriations of funds for improvements of various areas of Louisiana, especially Plaquemine (January-June 1887), others deal with pensions for veterans of the Mexican-American War (January-February 1887), and still others request funding or support in building churches and comment on the states of their congregations (March-June 1887). Documents and letters from the Department of Agriculture concern sugar production (January-February 1887).

Box 122: July-December 1887

Business papers include account sheets, insurance documents, bills for farm machinery and supplies, and letters to Edward J. Gay, John Gay, Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Political correspondence involves Edward J. Gay and discusses issues such as the sugar industry, extensions of railroads, farmland in Louisiana, and political appointments. Letters dealing with improvements in Bayou Plaquemine and along the Atchafalaya River are also included (September 1887). Other documents concern a tract of land in San Diego known as Point Loma Government Reservation (September 1887). In a letter to Edward Gay, Andrew Price mentions troubles in Thibodaux, referring to the labor dispute that turned violent and resulted in the execution of a large number of African-American strikers (November 29, 1887).

Box 123: January-February 1888

Business papers include account sheets, insurance documents, bills for farm machinery and supplies, and letters to Edward J. Gay, John Gay, Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Political correspondence involves Edward J. Gay and discusses issues such as legislation affecting the sugar industry and the postal industry, protective tariffs, extensions of railroads, farmland in Louisiana, and political appointments. Letters dealing with improvements in Bayous Teche, Plaquemine, and Lafourche and along the Atchafalaya River are included, as well as letters requesting the support of Edward Gay for bills in Congress. John H. Gay writes to his father of real estate in San Diego and the expansion of railroads bringing more and more people there (January 12, 1888). In a letter to Edward Gay, G. Montegut discusses Louisiana politics and the organization of the Democratic Party, mentioning John McEnery, Francis T. Nicholls, and the murder of Patrick Mealey (January 17, 1888) and in another, Joseph Breaux writes to Gay concerning the Blair education bill (February 17, 1888). Other letters to Edward J. Gay express sympathy and concern about a fall in which he broke his arm (February 1888).

Box 124: March-April 1888

Business papers include account sheets, insurance documents, bills for farm machinery and supplies, and letters to Edward J. Gay, John Gay, Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placing orders, and requesting loans. Political correspondence involves Edward J. Gay and discusses issues such as legislation affecting the sugar, lumber, and postal industries, protective tariffs, and political appointments. Letters dealing with improvements in Bayous Teche, Plaquemine, and Lafourche and along the Atchafalaya River are included, as well as letters requesting the support of Edward Gay for bills in Congress. In a letter to his father, Andrew Gay mentions politics in Louisiana and his speculation that African-Americans in Iberville Parish would vote for Warmoth in the coming gubernatorial election (March 5, 1888), John Gay tells his father of the expansion of railroads in California (March 31, 1888), and Major and Mrs. Butler write to Gay discussing the construction of a church and a school in St. Louis (March 1-16, 1888). Also included are letters asking for Edward Gay‟s support of the bill granting aid to the “Colored People‟s National Industrial Exposition” in Atlanta (March 16-29, 1888) and a letter from Lizzie Matthews asking his support of Senator Blair‟s bill which would better protect self-supporting women (March 17, 1888). A number of letters concern pension claims, including one for a captain of the Louisiana Native Guards (March 27, 1888) and a letter from Jane Robinson discusses a memorial for her late husband, Col. Harai Robinson, as well as his military history (April 2, 1888).

Box 125: May-June 1888

Business papers include account sheets, bills for farm machinery and supplies, and letters to Edward J. Gay, John Gay, Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placement of orders, and requesting loans. Political correspondence involves Edward J. Gay and discusses issues such as legislation affecting the sugar, lumber, and postal industries, protective tariffs, and political appointments. Letters dealing with improvements in Bayous Teche, Plaquemine, and Lafourche and along the Atchafalaya River are included, as well as letters requesting the support of Edward Gay for bills in Congress. Also included are letters concerning money and support of Louisiana Methodist Churches, relating to pension claims and legislation affecting claims, and a report prepared for Congress presenting New Orleans as a site for a navy yard (May 15, 1888). A letter from G. Montegut informs Gay of severe flooding in Bayou Blue near Houma (May 19, 1888) and land documents from the Department of the Interior identify overflowed tracts of land east of the Mississippi River (June 1888). Dudley Avery of Avery Island writes to Gay thanking him for his efforts in relation to lowering shipping prices of salt in Louisiana (June 20, 1888).

Box 126: July-December 1888

Business papers include account sheets, bills for farm machinery and supplies, and letters to Edward J. Gay, John Gay, Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placement of orders, and requesting loans. Political correspondence involves Edward J. Gay and discusses issues such as protective tariffs, political appointments, pension claims, and legislation affecting the sugar, lumber, and postal industries. Letters dealing with improvements in Bayou Plaquemine and along the Atchafalaya River are included, as well as letters requesting the support of Edward Gay for bills in Congress. William Preston Johnson, president of Tulane University, writes to Edward Gay of his ideas on education and the needs of his university (July 23, 1888) and a number of letters discuss Louisiana politics and possible Congressional nominations, including one from Murphy Foster to Andrew Price (July 24, 1888). Other letters from Louisiana mention a severe storm which damaged property and crops (August 19-23, 1888) and address the need to expand signal stations to warn of approaching storms (August 25, 1888). A letter from Andrew Gay mentions the death of Major Butler‟s father, E.G.W. Butler (October 1, 1888), a number of letters congratulate Gay on his reelection to Congress for his third term (November, 1888), and a letter from Theophile Allain requests Gay‟s help to

make books available for Gilbert Seminary, an African-American school in Baldwin, La. (December 10, 1888).

Box 127: January-December 1889

Business papers include account sheets, bills for farm machinery and supplies, and letters to Edward J. Gay, John Gay, Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placement of orders, and requesting loans. Political correspondence involves Edward J. Gay and discusses issues such as protective tariffs, political appointments, pension claims, and legislation affecting the sugar, lumber, and postal industries. Letters dealing with improvements in Bayou Plaquemine and along the Atchafalaya River are included, as well as letters requesting the support of Edward Gay for bills in Congress (January-May, 1889). Also included are payrolls for Kuneman Plantation and a school speech written by Andrew H. Gay, Jr. (April 4, 1889). Also included are newspaper clippings announcing the death of Edward J. Gay and speculating who will assume his seat in Congress (May 31-June 25, 1889) as well as letters from friends and family members expressing their condolences. Letters involving L.L. Butler, Andrew Price, Lavinia, and Andrew Gay discuss issues of the estate and heirs of Edward Gay (June 1889). Documents such as a release of indebtedness of Mrs. Lavinia Gay to the heirs of Edward J. Gay are also included (July 22, 1889) as well as a suit of Lavinia Gay et al versus L.L. Butler et al for the partition of real estate and documents relating to it (October 1889).

Box 128: January-December 1890

Business papers include account sheets, bills for farm machinery and supplies, and letters to Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placement of orders, and requesting loans. William Erwin writes to Andrew Gay from St. Louis Plantation of an outbreak of disease among his cattle and what he is doing to take care of the situation (August 7, 1890). Letters involving L.L. Butler, Andrew Price, Lavinia, John, and Andrew Gay discuss issues of the estate and heirs of Edward J. Gay and certain business matters taken over after his death. Also included are documents granting Andrew H. Gay power of attorney for John H. Gay (March 7, 1890), Anna Gay Price (March 10, 1890), and Sophie M. Crow (March 21, 1890). A letter and certificate from Governor Nicholls appoint Andrew H. Gay a delegate to the Mississippi River Improvement and Levee Convention on April 30, 1890. Letters from Nannie Gay Price to her mother address events in Washington D.C. after her husband, Andrew Price, assumed Edward Gay‟s seat in Congress (July 1890). Also included are payrolls of Kuneman Plantation.

Box 129: January-December 1891

Business papers include account sheets, bills for legal fees, farm machinery, and supplies, and letters to Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discussing crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placement of orders, and requesting loans. Letters involving L.L. Butler, Andrew Price, Lavinia, John, and Andrew Gay discuss issues of the estate and heirs of Edward J. Gay and certain business matters taken over after his death. Also included is a list of possessions Lavinia Gay wishes to leave her grandchildren upon her death (April 1891). Letters from Nannie Gay Price to her mother address events in Washington D.C. after her husband, Andrew Price, assumed Edward Gay‟s seat in Congress. Also included are payrolls of Kuneman, Dunboyne, California, and Augusta Plantations and licenses for Andrew H. Gay and Lavinia Gay for Sugar Production (July 24, 1891). A document containing proportions of ownership for the heirs of Charles Clement, Lodo Gay‟s father, is also included (September 1891). Letters amongst the Gay family also express their sadness at their mother‟s death and discuss what will come of her affairs (November 1891).

Box 130: January-December 1892

Business papers include account sheets, insurance policies (July 3, 1892), bills for legal fees, farm machinery, shipping, and supplies, and most are addressed to Andrew H. Gay. Letters to Andrew Gay,

L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discuss crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placement of orders, and requesting loans. Also included is a report of the books and accounts of Union Plantation (June 11, 1892). A number of letters and documents deal with property in Louisiana associated with the estate of Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Gay, including a certified copy of the judgment (August 20, 1892), and various letters to Andrew Gay request money and support for Methodist churches and schools in the state. Letters to Andrew Gay are written by Nannie and Andrew Price and discuss events and issues from Washington D.C., including the tariff debate (March 12, 1892) and free silver (March 29, 1892). In a letter to her sisters, Lavinia Gay writes from her honeymoon of the scenery, wildlife, and people of Bermuda (May 10, 1892). Also included is Andrew Gay‟s appointment to Police Juror in Iberville Parish (June 7, 1892) and payrolls for Dunboyne Plantation.

Box 131: January-September 1893

Business papers include account sheets, bills for legal fees, farm machinery, shipping, and supplies, and most are addressed to Andrew H. Gay. Letters to Andrew Gay, L.L. Butler, and Andrew Price discuss crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placement of orders, and requesting loans. A number of letters and documents deal with the partition of property in Louisiana associated with the estate of Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Gay. Letters to Andrew Gay are written by Nannie and Andrew Price and discuss events and issues from Washington D.C., such as sugar prices. Two letters describe the inauguration of Grover Cleveland, one from Edward J. Gay, III to his parents from a school trip in Washington (March 7, 1893), and the other from Nannie to her brother Andrew (March 10, 1893). Other letters to Andrew from the Prices inquire about the extent of recent destruction at Acadia Plantation (April 1893). Also included are payrolls for California and Union Plantations.

Box 132: October 1893-December 1894

Business papers include account sheets, bills for legal fees, farm machinery, shipping, and supplies, and most are addressed to Andrew H. Gay. Letters to and from Andrew Gay and L.L. Butler discuss crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placement of orders, and requesting loans. Letters from Nannie and Andrew Price discuss events and issues from Washington D.C., such as sugar prices and the tariff bill. Payrolls for Augusta Plantation are also included, as well as statements of the receipts and disbursements of the Gay building in St. Louis for each month of 1894. A letter to Edward J. Gay III from his mother mentions a fire at the St. Charles hotel in New Orleans (May 3, 1894) and a letter to Lodoiska C. Gay from a relative discusses genealogy of the Clement family (May 12, 1894).

Box 133: January 1895-December 1896

Business papers include crop reports, account sheets, tax receipts, and bills for shipping and supplies, and most concern Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. Letters to and from Andrew H. Gay discuss crops on various plantations, payments, shipments, labor, placement of orders, and requesting loans. Letters from Nannie and Andrew Price discuss events and issues from Washington D.C., such as sugar prices. In a letter to her brother, Sophie Crow tells of recent travels to Istanbul. She expresses her enjoyment of the trip despite rumors she heard of Armenian atrocities (April 11, 1895). A number of letters are written to Edward J. Gay, III from his parents, brothers, and sisters and discuss family news, including going to New Orleans for Mardi Gras (February 1896). One letter from Nannie Gay mentions Edward‟s joining the Republican ranks and returning to the days when he “shouted for „Kellogg‟” (October 23, 1896).

Box 134: January-October 1897

Account sheets pertaining to Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. make up a good deal of the business papers along with tax receipts, payrolls, crop reports, and bills for supplies. A document sent to Andrew Price concerns partitions of property belonging to the Gay heirs in Washington, D.C. (March 12, 1897). Letters to Edward J. Gay, III from various family members provide news such as the

progression of the family business (January 12, 1897), rising river levels (April-May 1897), the Tennessee Centennial Exposition (September 1897), and a yellow fever outbreak in the South (September-October 1897).

Box 135: November 1897-May 1898

Account sheets pertaining to Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. make up a good deal of the business papers along with tax receipts, plantation payrolls, crop reports, and bills of lading. Letters to Edward J. Gay, III from various family members inquire about his studies at Princeton and provide news such as the yellow fever quarantine in New Orleans (November 7, 1897), and news and speculation surrounding war with Spain (March 29-April 1898).

Box 136: June 1898-March 1899

Business papers addressed to Andrew H. Gay include account sheets pertaining to Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. along with tax receipts, plantation payrolls, crop reports, and bills of lading. Letters to Edward J. Gay, III from various family members provide news such as the death of Major Butler (June 4, 1898), yellow fever in Plaquemine, La. (October 7, 1898), and a smallpox scare in New Orleans (March 1899). One letter mentions a severe cold spell in Louisiana and sheets of ice floating down the Mississippi River (February 16, 1899). Other letters to Edward J. Gay, III concern examinations at Princeton (July 16, 1898), dental bills (July 11, 1898), and his decision to leave Princeton (August 6, 1898). Also included is a book titled, “The New Tablet Method of Bookkeeping and Business Training: Complete Course” (undated), an account journal of Edward Gay (March 21, 1899), and a business agreement admitting Edward Gay as a partner in the Wholesale Grocery house in New Orleans (January 1, 1899).

Box 137: April-September 1899

Business papers include account sheets pertaining to Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. along with tax receipts, and bills for various supplies addressed to Andrew H. Gay, as well as account journals of Edward J. Gay, III. Also included are two track charts mapping the route of the steamship City of Rome carrying Edward Gay from New York to Glasgow (July 1899). Letters to Edward Gay from family members provide family news, discuss his trip to Europe (July 1899), and mention yellow fever cases in New Orleans and throughout the South (September 16, 1899).

Box 138: October-December, undated 1899

Business papers include account sheets and receipts for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from Wm. B. Bloomfield, Commission Merchant in New Orleans. Also included are business examinations of Edward J. Gay, III (undated) and a number of printed items related to Edward Gay‟s travels in Europe including hotel brochures, train schedules, city maps, and U.S. Customs notices (undated).

Box 139: January-April 1900

Business papers include tax receipts, balance sheets, and receipts for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from Wm. B. Bloomfield. Letters from Andrew H. Gay, Jr. to his father discuss the crops and condition of Augusta Plantation, and Andrew Price writes to Andrew Gay, Sr. concerning what the family should do with Evergreen Plantation (March 14, 1900). Other letters from Andrew and Nannie Price discuss the upcoming gubernatorial and legislative elections in Louisiana (April 1900).

Box 140: May-July 1900

Account sheets, bills of lading, and receipts for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from Wm. B. Bloomfield make up a majority of business papers. Also included are letters from Andrew H. Gay, Jr. to his father updating him of plantation news, such as the condition of the sugar cane, work of laborers, as well as his opinions on new machinery.

Box 141: August-November 14, 1900

Account sheets, bills of lading, tax receipts, and receipts for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from Wm. B. Bloomfield make up a majority of business papers. Also included are letters from Andrew H. Gay, Jr. to his father updating him of plantation news, a letter from the Louisiana Sugar Planters‟ Association inviting the Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. to membership (August 22, 1900), letters from laborers seeking employment on a plantation, and a letter from Andrew H. Gay, Sr. describing Augusta, Shady Grove, and Oaks Plantations in the hope of selling one (October 24, 1900).

Box 142: November 15-December 31, 1900; undated

Account sheets, bills of lading, tax receipts, and receipts for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from Wm. B. Bloomfield make up a majority of business papers. Letters from Andrew H. Gay, Jr. to his father update him of plantation news, especially relating to Augusta Plantation. Also included is a brochure entitled, “Deming System of Clarification” (ca. 1900).

Box 143: January-June 1901

Business papers include account sheets, tax receipts, and receipts for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from Wm. B. Bloomfield. Letters from John H. Gay and from Mary Susan Gay discuss the desire to sell their shares in Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. stock. Other letters to Andrew H. Gay address issues such as farm equipment, accounts, and the sale of property. Also included is a letter to Anna M. Gay concerning the opening of a kindergarten (May 30, 1901).

Box 144: July-November 1901

Business papers include account sheets, tax receipts, and receipts for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from Wm. B. Bloomfield. Letters to Andrew H. Gay address issues such as the sugar market, farm equipment, accounts, the sale of property, levee boards (October 24, 1901), and sugar cane in Hawaii (October 8, 1901). In a letter to her son Edward, L.C. Gay mentions the assassination of President McKinley and the reaction of her neighbors (PM September 9, 1901).

Box 145: December 1901-January 1902

Business papers include account sheets, tax receipts, and receipts for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from Wm. B. Bloomfield. Letters to Andrew Gay from Bloomfield discuss accounts, shipments, and sugar prices. Also included is an account of stock of St. Louis Plantation and a diagram of the St. Louis sugar house store room (January 1, 1902) and notification of Edward J. Gay‟s appointment as Judge Advocate of the Louisiana Division United Sons of Confederate Veterans (January 3, 1902). A letter to Edward J. Gay from his friend, King, tells extensively of his travels in Japan and Sri Lanka (January 8, 1902).

Box 146: February-August 1902

Business papers include account sheets, tax receipts, and receipts for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from Wm. B. Bloomfield. Letters to Andrew Gay from Bloomfield discuss accounts, shipments, and sugar prices and a number of letters from the Board of State Engineers in Louisiana and Board of Commissioners of the Atchafalaya Basin Levee

District address river levels and legislation concerning levees in the state, including the Morganza levee (February 25, 1902), the Bayou Goula levee (March 12, 1902), and the Oakley levee (June 24, 1902). Personal correspondence includes letters to Edward Gay from his mother and father describing the baths in Hot Springs, Arkansas (March 4-21, 1902) and a letter to Edward from his friend, King, discussing his travels aboard the Auguste Victoria en route to Europe, mentioning a visit from German Kaiser Wilhem II. A constitution of the United Sons of Confederate Veterans is also included (April 1902).

Box 147: September-November 1902

Business papers include account sheets, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from Wm. B. Bloomfield. Letters to Andrew Gay from Bloomfield discuss accounts, shipments, and sugar prices and a number of letters from the Board of State Engineers in Louisiana and Board of Commissioners of the Atchafalaya Basin Levee District address river levels and legislation concerning levees in the state.

Box 148: December 1902-February 1903

Business papers include account sheets, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Letters to Andrew Gay, Sr. from his son send plantation updates, such as an outbreak of glanders among the stock (January 18, 1903), and news concerning the family‟s company, and letters from the Board of Commissioners of the Atchafalaya Basin Levee District address river levels and legislation concerning levees in the state. One such letter talks of prisoners assigned to levee work (December 3, 1902).

Box 149: March-June 1903

Business papers include account sheets, insurance documents, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Letters to Andrew Gay, Sr. from his son send plantation updates, including a description of a mill explosion in which 8 men were killed (May 25, 1903), and letters from the Board of Commissioners of the Atchafalaya Basin Levee District address plans of action as river levels rise and precautions necessary to save levees for future floods. James Pirie writes to Gay of his complaints concerning some rice planters and the damage they are doing to levees (April 25, 1903). Also included is a blueprint of a cross section of a levee (March 10, 1903) and a program of the Farmers‟ Institute under the State Board of Agriculture and Immigration (June 8, 1903). A number of letters written by Andrew Gay, E.G. Crow, and F.D. Oellion discuss the construction of a bridge across an alley behind the Gay Building in St. Louis (March 1903). Letters and programs from the Louisiana Division of the United Sons of Confederate Veterans discuss upcoming conventions (May-June 1903). Letters among family members discuss news and provide updates, especially concerning the health of Andrew Price.

Box 150: July-October 1903

Business papers include account sheets, insurance documents, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Letters to Andrew Gay, Sr. from his son send plantation updates, and letters from the Board of Commissioners of the Atchafalaya Basin Levee District address legislation and issues concerning levees and river levels.

Box 151: November-December 6, 1903

Business papers include account sheets, insurance documents, sugar cane reports, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Letters to Andrew Gay, Sr. from his son send plantation updates, and letters from the Board of Commissioners of

the Atchafalaya Basin Levee District address legislation concerning levees and issues such as repairs of levee breaches.

Box 152: December 7, 1903-February 28, 1904

Business papers include account sheets, sugar cane reports, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from applicants seeking work, letters from his son providing plantation updates, and letters from the Board of Commissioners of the Atchafalaya Basin Levee District addressing levee inspections and repairs of breaches. Also included is personal correspondence to Andrew and Lodo Gay relaying family news and thanks for various gifts (undated, 1903). In a letter to Gay, Andrew Price mentions Edward J. Gay, III‟s nomination for the Legislature (January 12, 1904). An extract from the minutes of a meeting of the Atchafalaya Basin Levee District records the resignation of Andrew Gay, Sr. as President of the Board (January 2, 1904).

Box 153: March-June 1904

Business papers include account sheets, sugar cane reports, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from applicants seeking work, and letters from his son providing plantation updates. Also included are letters discussing sales of property belonging to the Gay family (March-April, 1904), and letters concerning the purchase of a locomotive and construction of railroads by Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. on various plantations (April-June 1904).

Box 154: July-November 10, 1904

Business papers include account sheets, plantation payrolls, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from William B. Bloomfield discussing sugar and molasses markets, and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr. providing plantation updates.

Box 155: November 11-December 31, 1904

Business papers include account sheets, plantation payrolls, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from William B. Bloomfield discussing shipments, and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr. providing plantation updates.

Box 156: January-March 1905

Business papers include account sheets, plantation payrolls, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from William B. Bloomfield discussing shipments, and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr. providing plantation updates and news concerning the construction of railroads on the plantations. One letter mentions tenants leaving plantations and moving to cities such as Baton Rouge and Donaldsonville (January 7, 1905). Also included is Andrew Gay‟s resignation from the Atchafalaya Levee Board (January 9, 1905) and his appointment to the Executive Committee of the Interstate Mississippi River Improvement and Levee Association (March 1, 1905). Letters from Joseph Weaver & Sons to Andrew Gay discuss the lumber business in Canton, Ohio, and request money from Gay to stay afloat (January 28-March 12, 1905). Also included is a letter from Stella Bringier to Gay asking for his

remembrances of her husband, Louis Amedee Bringier, as they fought together in the Civil War (March 9, 1905).

Box 157: April-May 1905

Business papers include account sheets, plantation payrolls, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from William B. Bloomfield discussing shipments, from his nephew, E.G. Crow, concerning Gay family property in St. Louis, and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr. providing plantation updates and news concerning the construction of railroads on the plantations. A letter to Andrew Gay informs him of an electric railway that is to be built in St. Louis that will cross over his property (May 17, 1905). Also included are specifications for a high grade steam plant for St. Louis Plantation (April 4-8, 1905) and for high pressure boilers (April 7-8, May 2, 1905), as well as letters from inspectors and insurers discussing their operation (May 1905). Letters between Joseph Weaver & Sons and Andrew Gay discuss the reorganization of the Weaver Lumber Company and Gay‟s involvement in it (April-May 1905).

Box 158: June-October 1905

Business papers include account sheets, plantation payrolls, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from William B. Bloomfield discussing shipments, from his nephew, E.G. Crow, concerning Gay family property in St. Louis, and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr. providing plantation updates and news concerning the construction of railroads on the plantations. A letter from Bloomfield discusses the oil business and its effect on oil shipped to St. Louis Plantation (June 10, 1905). Letters between Joseph Weaver & Sons and Andrew Gay discuss the reorganization of the Weaver Lumber Company and Gay‟s involvement in it (July-September 1905). Also included are specifications and a contract for fuel oil equipment for St. Louis Plantation (June 5, 1905) and contracts for other machinery bought by Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. A yellow fever outbreak in New Orleans is mentioned in a number of letters concerning delays of deliveries, rerouting transportation, and quarantines in the city (September 25-27, 1905). Andrew Gay, Jr. writes to his father of yellow fever spreading to Iberville Parish, including a case in the Augusta Plantation quarters (October 25- 30, 1905).

Box 159: November 1905

Business papers include account sheets, plantation payrolls, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from William B. Bloomfield discussing shipments, and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr. providing plantation updates and news concerning the construction of railroads on the plantations. Letters from Andrew Gay, Jr. mention a number of lingering cases of yellow fever in Iberville Parish (November 5-17, 1905). C.H. McMillan of the Mercantile Trust Co. writes to Andrew Gay, Sr. concerning land for sale in St. Louis (November 23, 1905).

Box 160: December 1905-February 1906

Business papers include account sheets, plantation payrolls, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from William B. Bloomfield discussing orders and shipments, with one letter mentioning the sugar industry in Puerto Rico (December 22, 1905), and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr. providing plantation updates, discussing possible land sales in Grosse Tete, and relaying news concerning the construction of drainage canals, railroads, and telephone lines on the plantations. Letters from F.D.

Oellien to Andrew Gay, Sr. discuss real estate in St. Louis (December 1905-January 1906), a letter from Robert Pettebone proposes the sale of his Keystone Plantation (January 12, 1906), and a letter from C.C. Miller thanks Gay for his contribution to Centenary College and discusses its future (December 22, 1905). Also included are a circular from German-American Savings Bank and Trust Co. (December 12, 1905) and a letter to Gay informing him of his allotment of shares in the bank (December 23, 1905). Additionally, the specifications for a high grade steam plant for St. Louis Plantation (undated), an inventory of the Weaver Lumber Co. (January 1, 1906), and letters from J. Allen Weaver discussing the finances of the company (January 3-24, 1906) are also included. J.B. Moberly of the Mercantile Trust Co. writes to Andrew Gay, Sr. concerning his real estate in St. Louis (January-February 1905).

Box 161: March-June 1906

Business papers include account sheets, plantation payrolls, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, a mortgage agreement, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from the Mercantile Trust Co. discussing the management and sales of various properties in St. Louis, from William B. Bloomfield discussing a glucose plant at Belle Alliance, La. as well as orders and shipments, and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr. providing plantation updates and relaying news concerning the construction of drainage canals, railroads, and telephone lines on the plantations. In one letter, he mentions the sheriff riding over his plantation searching for two African-Americans accused of committing a crime (March 11, 1906). Letters from the Mercantile Trust Co. to Andrew Gay, Sr. discuss real estate in St. Louis, and letters from Fred B. Merrills express his interest in serving as Gay‟s local agent to attend to farms and tenants on the family‟s land in Illinois (March 23, April 16, 1906). Also included is a letter to Andrew Gay as president of the Iberville Parish Police Jury requesting payment for a nurse employed by the parish during the yellow fever outbreak of 1905 (April 10, 1906). In letters to his father, Andrew Gay, Jr. inquires about family members who were in California at the time of the San Francisco earthquake on April 18, 1906 (April 22-May 3, 1906). Other family correspondence expresses concerns for Gay‟s rheumatism and speaks of his visit to Hot Springs. Edward J. Gay, III also writes to his father and discusses a trip to Vicksburg with a number of other legislators and a bill appropriating funds to erect a monument there to Louisiana troops. He also mentions an electrical fire in the Senate of the State Capitol in which most “old pictures and valuable documents” were saved (June 8, 1906).

Box 162: July-November 1906

Business papers include account sheets, plantation payrolls, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from the Mercantile Trust Co. discussing the management and sales of various properties in St. Louis, from William B. Bloomfield discussing a glucose plant at Belle Alliance, La. as well as orders and shipments, and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr. providing plantation updates and relaying news concerning the construction of drainage canals, railroads, and telephone lines on the plantations. In one letter to his father, Gay tells of a fire at the railroad depot in Grosse Tete and of local suspicion of arson (October 6, 1906), and in another he tells of a story in the newspaper about the stabbing of the president of Centenary College (October 28, 1906). Correspondence from Fred B. Merrills updates Gay about his tenants and property in Illinois, including a letter discussing land containing a coal mine (October 26, 1906). In a letter to his uncle Andrew Gay, E.G. Butler talks of property in Washington D.C., mentioning that, “the neighborhood is such that a colored resident will not hurt values” (November 13, 1906). Letters from attorney Valle Reyburn and Wyatt Shallcross discuss a suit against the Gay family concerning land in St. Louis claimed by Mrs. McCutcheon. A number of financial documents reflect the expenses of the glucose plant at Belle Alliance. In a letter to Andrew Gay, Festus J. Wade of the Business Men‟s League requests Gay use his influence to encourage Louisiana‟s Governor Blanchard to attend the Deep Water Way Convention in St. Louis to discuss Mississippi River

improvement (September 15, 1906). Other correspondence expresses concerns for Gay‟s rheumatism and speaks of his visit to Hot Springs, Ark. and Buffalo Lithia Springs, Va. A letter from William B. Bloomfield is addressed to all sugar planters and discusses the rules and regulations for the enforcement of the Food and Drug Act meant to go into effect January 1, 1907 (November 3, 1906), and a resolution from the Atchafalaya Basin Levee Board discusses the removal of the Donaldsonville Dam (November 28, 1906).

Box 163: December 1906-August 1907

Business papers include account sheets, plantation payrolls, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, tax receipts, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from the Mercantile Trust Co. discussing the management and sales of various properties in St. Louis, including one letter lodging a complaint relative to fire escapes in buildings owned by the Gays (April 11, 1907), from William B. Bloomfield discussing a glucose plant at Belle Alliance, La. as well as orders and shipments, and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr. providing plantation updates and relaying news concerning flooding on the plantations and dredging of canals. Correspondence from Fred B. Merrills updates Gay about his tenants and property in Illinois. A number of financial documents reflect the expenses of the glucose plant at Belle Alliance, and a proposed agreement deals with its act of sale (December 26, 1906). Also included is a rough statement of the resources and liabilities of Keystone Plantation (undated) and a blank sugar cane contract (undated). Andrew Gay, Jr. writes to his father from his trip to Cuba about the sugar industry there (January 19-22, 1907). Another letter from Andrew Gay, Jr. tells his father of a problematic merchant who does not honor orders from African-American hands or charges them higher prices (March 15, 1907). He also writes of outbreaks of smallpox, especially among African-Americans in the area (June 13, 1907). Letters from attorney Valle Reyburn discuss a suit against the Gay family concerning land in St. Louis claimed by Mrs. McCutcheon. A letter from Charles J. Slack of Woodlawn Plantation informs Gay of a bridge over Bayou Maringouin caving in (April 27, 1907) and a report of costs of a working dredge lists supplies, wages, and days of work (June 8, 1907).

Box 164: September 1907-January 1908

Business papers include account sheets, plantation payrolls, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from the Mercantile Trust Co. discussing the management and sales of various properties in St. Louis, from William B. Bloomfield discussing orders and shipments, and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr. providing plantation. A number of letters to Gay request work on his plantations, including one from the former manager of Nottoway Plantation (November 23, 1907). Correspondence from Fred B. Merrills updates Gay about his tenants and property in Illinois. Letters from Walter Saunders discuss a suit against the Gay family concerning land in St. Louis claimed by Mrs. McCutcheon. In a letter to her brother, Andrew Gay, Sophie Crow writes of President Theodore Roosevelt‟s recent visit to Missouri and mentions he is on his way south to hunt in the Louisiana canebrakes (October 6, 1907) and Nannie Price writes of meeting the president on his visit to Tennessee (October 26, 1907). A letter from George Whiting also discusses President Roosevelt and accuses him of “playing to the galleries” by subjecting large businesses and corporations to hostile legislation (October 10, 1907), while John H. Gay writes favorably of the president, praising him for his active lifestyle, but comments that he wishes a southern man would run for president (October 20, 1907).

Box 165: February-May 1908

Business papers include account sheets, plantation payrolls, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr.

includes letters from the Mercantile Trust Co. discussing the management and sales of various properties in St. Louis, from William B. Bloomfield discussing orders and shipments, and from his nephew, Edward Gay Butler, and his son, Andrew Gay, Jr., providing plantation news. One letter from Andrew Gay, Jr. discusses the fact that African-Americans are being forced to give up cropping because of their inability to receive advances from merchants and also discusses the arrival of the boll weevil destroying crops. He mentions that these factors make it difficult to sell property in Louisiana at the moment but he is in discussions with possible Italians tenants for West Oaks Plantation (February 8, 1908). Correspondence from Fred B. Merrills updates Gay about his tenants and property in Illinois. Letters from Walter Saunders discuss a suit against the Gay family concerning land in St. Louis claimed by Mrs. McCutcheon. Letters from the American Cane Growers‟ Association asks for support to defeat the free entry of Philippine sugar into the U.S. (February 27-March 3, 1908).

Box 166: June-October 1908

Business papers include account sheets, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from the Mercantile Trust Co. discussing the management and sales of various properties in St. Louis, from William B. Bloomfield discussing orders and shipments, and from his nephew, Edward Gay Butler, and his son, Andrew Gay, Jr., providing plantation news. Correspondence from Fred B. Merrills updates Gay about his tenants and property in Illinois. Letters from Walter Saunders discuss a suit against the Gay family concerning land in St. Louis claimed by Mrs. McCutcheon. A letter to Edward J. Gay, III discusses and lists land grants to members of the Gay family in central and western Virginia in the 18th and 19th centuries (June 5, 1908) and family letters among Andrew Gay, Nannie Price, Edward Gay Butler, Wyatt Shallcross, and Richard Plater discuss an upcoming meeting of the Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. stockholders.

Box 167: November 1908-March 1909

Business papers include account sheets, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from various merchants. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. includes letters from the Mercantile Trust Co. discussing the management and sales of various properties in St. Louis, from William B. Bloomfield discussing orders and shipments, and from his nephew, Edward Gay Butler, and his son, Andrew Gay, Jr., providing plantation news. Correspondence from Fred B. Merrills updates Gay about his tenants and property in Illinois. Family letters among Andrew Gay, Nannie Price, Edward Gay Butler, Wyatt Shallcross, and Richard Plater discuss an upcoming meeting of the Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. stockholders. A letter to Gay asks his opinion of a contract between the Atchafalaya Basin Levee District and the Board of Control of the State Penitentiary regarding levee work (November 5, 1908). Letters from Walter Saunders discuss a suit against the Gay family concerning land in St. Louis claimed by Mrs. McCutcheon.

Box 168: April-September 1909

Business papers include account sheets, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from William B. Bloomfield.

Box 169: October-December 1909

Business papers include account sheets, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from William B. Bloomfield.

Box 170: January-July 1910

Business papers include account sheets, stock forms, insurance documents, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from William B. Bloomfield. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. from the Mercantile Trust Co. discusses the management of property in St. Louis (April 30, 1910) and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr., provides plantation news (May-June 1910) and mentions his wife remaining awake the night before to view Halley‟s Comet (May 19, 1910). Also included are specifications and two photographs of a locomotive from Davenport Locomotive Works (June 25, 1910).

Box 171: August 1-November 11, 1910

Business papers include account sheets, bills of lading, daily mill reports, receipts listing shipment weights, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from William B. Bloomfield. Correspondence to Andrew Gay, Sr. from the Mercantile Trust Co. discusses the management of property in St. Louis, and from his son, Andrew Gay, Jr., provides plantation news. Letters from other manufacturers discuss their products. Also included are specifications of a locomotive and an agreement for its purchase from Vulcan Iron Works (September 8-9, 1910) as well as Andrew H. Gay‟s certificate appointing him to the Board of Commissioners of the Atchafalaya Basin Levee District (September 12, 1910).

Box 172: November 12-December 31, 1910, undated

Business papers include account sheets, bills of lading, daily mill reports of Union Plantation, receipts listing shipment weights, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from William B. Bloomfield. Also included is a trade circular from Davenport Locomotive Works (undated).

Box 173: January-March 1911

Business papers include account sheets, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from William B. Bloomfield. Letters between Gay and Bloomfield discuss shipments of molasses and the sugar market.

Box 174: April-June, December 1911, August 1913, 1936, 1938, undated

Business papers include account sheets, bills of lading, receipts listing shipment weights, and receipts for barrels of molasses and for goods purchased by Andrew H. Gay and Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. from William B. Bloomfield. Letters between Gay and Bloomfield discuss shipments of molasses, the sugar market, insurance questions, and stock of E.J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Co. Ltd. (April-June 1911). A letter from William Bloomfield to President Woodrow Wilson urges him to include the sugar industry in a tariff bill in order to protect sugar cane farmers (August 19, 1913), while a letter from Bloomfield to Gay tells of meeting the president and the progress made to protect the sugar industry (August 22, 1913). An invitation addressed to Charlie Gay announces the wedding of Carolyn Middleton and William Allen (October 25, 1936). Also included are lists of slaves belonging to Isaac and Mary Irwin (undated), a letter to Col. Joseph Erwin from Edward Douglass White discussing a debt owed him (undated), writings by Edward J. Gay, Sr. on subjects such as the sugar industry and his opposition to the Hawaiian Treaty (undated), a composition by John H. Gay, Jr. on African labor in the southern U.S. (undated), and writings by unknown authors on subjects such as improvement in the manufacture of sugar, the promotion of literature in America, amendments offered by Edward Gay, a legal case involving Civil War claims, and the Soleil Polarization Instrument used in sugar refining (undated).

Box 175: Undated

Memoranda include sketches and descriptions of plots of land in St. Louis, a contract allowing Edward J. Gay to construct a five story building in St. Louis, and school compositions by the children and

grandchildren of Edward Gay. Notes and letters concern sugar production, labor, payrolls, and accounts from correspondents such as L.L. Butler, Samuel Cranwill, William T. Gay, David Barrow, and Mercantile Trust Co. One letter from L.L. Butler discusses his mother‟s will, a letter from A.E. Conlon discusses a confrontation with Sophie and Philip Crow, and a number of letters to Mrs. John Gay relay family news. Fragments of a number of letters are also included.

Box 176: Undated

Memoranda concern sugar production, labor, payrolls, and accounts. One memorandum discusses an unsettled account between Andrew Hynes and Joseph Erwin, and another shows evidence (such as crops, bonds, and slave sales) that Joseph Erwin is indebted to Eliza Willow. Notes and letters request shipments, recommend laborers, and place orders for sugar, molasses, cotton, and other goods. Some letters among the Gay family discuss real estate in St. Louis. Business correspondents include Andrew Hynes, Samuel Cranwill, Edward J. Gay, John H. Gay, Jr., William H. Glasgow, David Barrow, and James L. Lobdell; some personal correspondence of the Craighead family and of the Gay family is also included. Lizzie Cary Gay writes to Edward Gay about the genealogy of his family. A letter from Francis B. Fay is included, in which he provides his views on slavery and the split between North and South. A number of fragments of letters, receipts, and accounts are included, and some documents pertain to John B. Craighead‟s will and testament and some to the estate of John Erwin.

Box 177: Undated

Memoranda concern sugar production, labor, payrolls, and accounts. One list provides the names of destitute freedmen employed by D.W. Barrow and another outlines expenses paid by Andrew H. Gay for travel from New Orleans to Washington, D.C. Other documents include bills of lading, the succession of Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Gay, and the dictation of Edward Gay while on his deathbed. Notes and letters request shipments, recommend laborers, and place orders for sugar, molasses, cotton, and other goods. Business correspondents include L.L. Butler. A number of fragments of letters, receipts, and accounts are included as well as drawings of plots of land, parts of machines, and sketches of monuments.

Box 183: 1884-1890, undated

This box contains empty envelopes.

Series II., Printed Items, 1837-1911, undated

Box 178: 1859-1911

This box consists of printed items such as weekly price currents, church programs, a catalogue for Jordan, Marsh & Co. (1880-1881), German and French lessons, broadsides for various machinery, summaries from meetings of the Louisiana Sugar Planters‟ Association (1884-1885), and small biographies of Charles Erasmus Fenner. Also included are issues of The Pantops World (1893-1894), an issue of Council Fire (October 1888), an issue of The Southern Manufacturer (November 1900), and newspaper clippings. A number of speeches from the House of Representatives concern subjects such as tariffs and revenue reform.

Also included is a Democratic National Convention Badge (July 4, 1900).

Box 184: 1837-1901, undated

This box contains various printed volumes such as court decisions (undated), Interstate Commerce Commission Reports and Opinions (1889), a speech of Justin S. Morrill (1881), a report of the U.S. Treasury Department (1844), issues of The Sugar Cane, a publication for sugar cane growers (1869-1871), issues of The Confederate Veteran (1900-1901), an issue of New West Illustrated (September 1884), an issue of Vogue (November 29, 1900), railway timetables, and catalogues.

Box 179: Undated

This box consists of business cards, calling cards, invitations, broadsides, blank insurance documents, and newspaper clippings. Also included is an extract from The New Iberia Enterprise on “The Importance of Opening Bayou Plaquemine,” reports from the House of Representatives, The Assembly's Shorter Catechism, a catalogue from McGregor Bros. Florists (1890), and a book of Cook‟s Hotel Coupons.

Series III., Photographs, 1874-1901, undated.

Box 180: 1874-1901, undated

Included are photographs of family members and friends in locations such as St. Louis Plantation, Belair Plantation, San Diego, Calif., and Pike‟s Peak, Col. Other photographs include sugar cane storage facilities, landscapes, and homes.

Box 181: Undated

Included are photographs of family members and friends in locations such as Louisiana, Colorado, and Canada. Other photographs include California ranch scenes, sugar cane fields, and homes.

Box 182: Undated

Included are photographs of residences, sugar cane loaders, sugar mills, and unidentified family members. A number of stereoptical views are also included.

Note: See box 183 under papers and box 184 under printed items.

Box 185: Undated

Photographs of plantation and sugar mill.

Box 186: 1888, 1894, and Undated

Photographs of plantation and sugar mill, as well as Francis P. Butler (1894), Louisiana Congressional Delegation (1888), New Orleans River Front (undated), New Orleans street children (undated), and the Steamboat Mabel Comeaux (undated)

Vault Box 1 and 2: Undated

78 glass plate negatives, as follows:

Mississippi River scenes (2)

St. Louis Plantation (2)

Plantation scenes, probably St. Louis (10)

Unidentified buildings (9)

Stereo view of White Mountains

Solid Comfort, Andrew H. Gay‟s Wisconsin summer home (1)

Landscape views (10), presumably in Wisconsin and Tennessee

Members of the Gay family (primarily), including Anna Gay Butler at Belair. (36)

Additional seven (7) too damaged to identify

Series IV. Manuscript Volumes, 1825-1919, undated.

Volumes 1-31 pertain to the Joseph Erwin Estate

1. Bank Book, 1837 1844, undated

a. Bank Book, 1837-1839

b. Cashbook, 1840-1844

Exchange and Banking Co. of Plaquemine accounts with succession of D.D. Chestnut and John B. Craighead. Cashbook entries include account, 1844, of Caroline Wilson with John B. Craighead and miscellaneous payments in Tennessee.

2. Bank Book, 1838-1845

Account of Hynes and Craighead with Union Branch Bank of Plaquemine concerning Erwin Estate.

3. Bank Book, 1838-1840

Account of Hynes and Craighead with bank of Louisiana pertaining to Erwin Estates. The bank book contains a list of names of the president and directors.

4. Bank Book, 1844-1846

Account of Hynes and Craighead probably pertaining to Erwin estates, with Mechanics and Trader‟s Bank. The volume contains a few memoranda.

5. Daybook, 1843-1847

Daybook, bearing mark “F” and initials “L.P.”, pertaining to the Erwin estate and consisting of accounts with blacks and laborers. The daybook contains a list of payments made by A. Hynes alone following settlement with Craighead, 1847.

6. Diary, 1837-1838

Diary of Thomas B. Craighead, grandson of Joseph Erwin, and student at Nashville College in Tennessee describing his school and a visit with General Jackson and Jackson‟s family (June 28, 1838). The diary also contains his expense account and memorandums.

7. Estate Record Book, 1825-1839

Record book, probably kept by John B. Craighead, pertaining to the Erwin estates consisting of miscellaneous memorandum and account concerning expenses of the plantation, including accounts with blacks.

8. Estate Record Book, 1831-1845

Record book “D”, pertaining to the estate of Lavinia Erwin, wife of Joseph, probably prepared by Hynes and Craighead, attorneys for Lavinia Erwin. The book contains accounts of Lavinia Erwin with Joseph Erwin estate; memorandums of expenses; memorandums of drafts on John Linton and on Lambeth and Thompson; expenditures for Erwin Estate (1831) and (1835-1836); debts recognized and owing by Erwin estate; accounts with blacks; purchases of supplies; lists of articles of clothing, tools, “fiddles,” Christmas handkerchiefs given slaves.

9. Estate Record Book, 1836-1842

Record book pertaining to estate of Erwin concerning division of estate, statement of expenditures, certificate acknowledging the burning of Nashville Bridge notes, other related items.

10. Estate Record Book, 1838-1841, 1853-1854

Consists of cash accounts, accounts with factors, statement for shipment of sugar, statements of liabilities of John B. Craighead with A. Hynes, memorandum signed James B. Craighead, stating that the personal papers of the late John B. Craighead were examined and his will was found in this book.

11. Estate Record Book, 1839-1844

Pertains to estate of Eliza Wilson prepared by John B. Craighead as tutor to the minor children, John and Caroline.

12. Estate Record Book, 1842-1847

Pertains to estate of Joseph Erwin concerning account of the Hynes and Craighead plantation.

13. Estate Record Book, 1844-1848

Concerns accounts of the Hynes and Craighead plantation containing information on debt owing and paid, sales and shipment and crops, division of crops, general expenses.

14. Expense Account Book, 1836-1839

Expense account book of J.E. Craighead to East Tennessee, including drugs and deposits in Philadelphia Bank.

15. Ledger, 1846-1849

Contains account of plantation expenses, and accounts with Andrew Hynes, Edward J. Gay & Co., Phocian McCreery, William R. Hynes, Hynes and Craighead, Charles Clement, J.E. Craighead and T.B.. Craighead.

16. Cashbook, 1824-1841

a. Cashbook, 1836-1841

b. Bank Book, 1834-1835

Deposit book of John B. Craighead with the Union Bank.

17. Cashbook, 1836-1844

Cashbook of John B. Craighead, including his account with John and Caroline Wilson.

18. Cashbook, 1837-1843

a. Cashbook, 1837-1843

b. Bank Book, 1839-1843

Pertains to settlement of the Erwin estate. Entries concern purchases for Erwin Plantation, crop reports and sales, payments to Negroes, statements of debt owed by Hynes and Craighead, inventory of slaves, medical treatments prescribed and miscellaneous receipts.

19. Cashbook, 1837-1852

a. Cashbook, 1843-1844, 1852

b. Bank Book, 1837

Deposit book of John B. Craighead with Planters Bank. Entries include charges to Jane Craighead, burial expenses of Robert Craighead, payments to Tennessee Craighead and others.

20. Cashbook, 1839-1840

Cashbook of Hynes and Craighead pertaining to Erwin estate, and containing memorandums concerning sales of sugar and molasses.

21. Cashbook, 1843-1845

a. Cashbook, 1843-1845

b. Bank Book, 1844-1845

Cash accounts of Hynes and Craighead pertaining to Erwin estate, and containing memorandums concerning payments to be made by Hynes and Craighead, debts, shipments of sugar and molasses, a list of members of William R. Hynes family, and other related items.

22. Cashbook, 1847-1848

Account of Joseph E. and Thomas B. Craighead showing credit and debts. Account with L. Desobry and Sons.

23. Cashbook, 1847-1849

General cash account of J.E. and T.B. Craighead, kept by T.B. Craighead for 1847 and probably by Andrew Hynes for 1848-1849.

24. Memorandum Book. 1812, 1837-1844

a. Memorandum Book, 1837-1844

b. Bank Book. 1812

Account, 1812, of the Mechanics Bank of Baltimore with Abraham Wright, and miscellaneous memorandums including inventory of house furniture on hand.

25. Memorandum Book, 1829-1831

Memorandum book pertaining to Joseph Erwin‟s estate including entries of expenses of Joseph Erwin, Jr., at hospital in Lexington, Kentucky (1829-1830), expenditures for clothing of Eliza Erwin (1831), account of Lavinia Erwin with estate of Joseph Erwin (1830), and money received from hire of slaves from Erwin Plantation.

26. Memorandum Book, 1837-1847, undated

a. Bank Book, 1837-1838

b. Memorandum Book, 1847, undated

Personal bank account of John B. Craighead and miscellaneous memorandum.

27. Memorandum Book, 1840

Memorandum book of Hynes and Craighead pertaining to the management of the Erwin estate and consisting largely of entries concerning the distribution of clothing and supplies to slaves.

28. Memorandum Book, 1840-1841

a. Memorandum Book, 1840-1841

b. Cashbook, 1841

Record Book of Hynes and Craighead pertaining to the estate of Joseph and Lavinia Erwin including cash accounts, sales of sugar, memorandum offering Mr. Marshall the plantation for $275,000 and debts due by Hynes and Craighead.

29. Memorandum Book, 1840-1852

Memorandum book pertaining to the Erwin estate and containing a list of debts due by Hynes and Craighead, memorandums of crops sold, description of Erwin Plantation, cash paid Phereby Craighead, Thomas B, and David Craighead, and sale of drafts.

30. Memorandum Book, 1845-1846

a. Memorandum Book, 1845-1846

b. Cashbook, 1845-1846

Record book of Andrew Hynes pertaining to the Erwin estate containing cash accounts with factors, memorandums regarding loans, division of sugar between Hynes and children with Craighead and cistern sugar sold.

31. Memorandum Book, 1846

Pertains to the Erwin estate and division of sugar and molasses between Col, Hynes and his children and J.E. and T.B. Craighead.

# 32 36 are Col. Andrew Hynes records

32. Bank Book, 1832

33. Daybook, 1826-1848

a. Daybook, 1826-1842

b. Cashbook, 1843-1848

Financial accounts of Andrew Hynes, Nashville, including lists of lands owned by him in Hickman County, Kentucky, list of notes due, lists of guests invited to wedding of daughter, Mary Jane (1846).

34. Estate Record Book, 1848-1855

Pertains to estate of Andrew Hynes kept by Edward J. Gay, executor, consists of accounts in community with Lavinia Gay, Mary Jane McCreery, and William R. Hynes designated as the “Hyans Plantation” and individual account of Andrew Hyans.

35. Moss Record Book, 1849-1861

Record Book showing accounts of purchases and shipment of moss from slaves of Hynes Plantation by Edward J. Gay.

36. Plantation Record Book, 1849-1860

a. Plantation Record Book, 1849-1860

b. Daybook, 1854-1858

Plantation record book contains accounts of articles (clothing, blankets, farm tools, etc.) given to slaves on Hynes Plantation; list of houses needed for accommodation of slaves; statement furnished assessor (1856); directions for planting cane; list of hands (men, women, and girls) belonging to Craighead and Johnston; list of field hands, kettle hands, and other laborers; inventory of slave hospital. Daybook contains accounts of Slaves for articles such as food and clothing charged to them.

# 37 92 pertain to Edward J. Gay, I (Representative)

37. Bank Book, 1863-1868

Account with City Bank of New Orleans and Citizens Bank, New Orleans

38. Cane Weight Book, 1882

Cane weight book of John H. Gay Jr., son of Rep. Gay, probably for the Oaks Plantation.

39. Cane Weight Book, 1884

Cane weight book of Edward J. Gay showing tonnage of cane hauled by tenants of “Front Place” and “Back Place” of St. Louis Plantation, and True Hope Plantation.

40. Cashbook, 1860-1866

Cashbook of Rep. Gay containing accounts with P.O. Daigre, W.T. Gay & Co., P.A. Giraud, C.W. Keep, Isaac Erwin, Mrs. A. Dickinson, and others.

41. Cashbook, 1867-1874, 1883

Cashbook of Andrew H. Gay containing accounts of “Live Oaks” (1867), “Ridgefield” (1868-1874) and “Augusta” including pay rolls for “Ridgefield” and “Augusta”, proceed from sale of sugar and molasses shipped by “Ridgefield” and “Augusta” and miscellaneous memoranda regarding agriculture farriery, stock breeding, measurements of land, and personal expenses.

42. Cashbook, 1868-1871

Cashbook of Rep. Gay showing accounts with plantation laborers, including supplies issued and money paid laborers at St. Louis Plantation, provisions to German laborers, articles to hospitals for use of German arriving, inventory of dry goods, shoes, etc. in attic, groceries issued Chinese.

43. Cashbook, 1871-1873

a. Cashbook, 1871-1873

b. Ledger Book, 1872-1873

Plantation account book of Rep. Gay containing accounts of food, cash, and supplies furnished plantation hands; coal wheelers‟ pay roll; measurements of coal in barge; memorandums of Keep, Booksch, and Kleinpeter Plantations; assessment of Edward J. Gay‟s property.

44. Cashbook, 1872-1874

a. Cashbook, 1873-1874

b. Time Book, 1872

c. Payroll, 1872

Cashbook, shows groceries, clothing, cash and sundries issued plantation hands. Time book shows earnings of laborers. Payroll books, for Teresa Plantation. Volumes includes statements furnished assessors for Woodland, Greenfield, Gay and Daigle, Gay and Garrett, St. Louis, Shady Grove, and Pecan Plantations, and timbered swamp land and Treville Hebert tract.

45. Check Stub Book, 1887

Check Stub Book of Rep. Gay pertaining to the Bank of California at San Francisco.

46. Crop Report Book, 1895-1904

a. Crop Report Book, 1895-1904

b. Journal, 1895

Crop report book of Andrew Gay, son of Rep. Gay for St. Louis, Augusta, Union, Dunboyne Plantations, showing barrel of sugar and molasses shipped, price received and person to whom sold. Journal of Andrew Gay containing entries for Union, Augusta, Dunboyne Plantations, and American Exchange Bank of St. Louis, Mo. The volume also contains plantation diary entries for Jan Feb, 1900.

47. Daybook, 1857-1860

Accounts with plantation laborers for cash paid and supplies issued, and credit given laborers for making brick, wages, splitting hoop poles, ditching, etc.

48. Daybook, 1869-1874

Daybook of Joseph Naylor, plantation laborer, St. Louis plantation, showing food, groceries, cash paid him and credit for wages due.

49. Daybook, 1877

Daybook of A. Aillet and G. Aillet, probably laborers on plantation of Edward J. Gay showing charges for bread, meal, and meat.

50. Daybook, 1877

Itemized daily entries of accounts receivable giving name of plantation laborer to whom items are charged at Kuneman plantation.

51. Investment Book, 1871-1891

Investment book of Lavinia Gay, wife of Rep. Gay, showing financial holdings and dividends collected.

52. Memorandum Book, 1857-1858

Memorandum book of Rep. Gay containing entries concerning building supplies and marble mantles for the construction of the St. Louis Plantation home, purchase of furniture and furnishings, medical treatments, sugar belonging to Craighead & Johnston, and the Hynes Plantation, addresses, etc.

53. Memorandum Book, 1862

Memorandum book of Rep. Gay containing entries concerning the sales of coffee, rice, molasses, and sugar, directions for making whitewash; and a letter to “Ned” from “Louis.”

54. Memorandum Book, 1867

Memorandum book of Edward J. Gay, Jr. son of Rep. Gay, concerning his trip to Niagara Falls and the East, including list of correspondence, drawings, and poetical writings.

55. Memorandum Book, 1868

Memorandum book of Edward J. Gay, Jr. son of Rep. Gay, containing home remedies, the “Red River Adventure” account his personal body measurements, and a listing of his favorite music.

56. Memorandum Book,1873-1874

Memorandum book, probably of Andrew H. Gay, son of Rep. Gay including account of William Anderson with John Yoist Co.

57. Memorandum Book, 1874-1875

Memorandum book of Rep. Gay containing entries regarding money to be collected, accounts with laborers, medical treatments, cane from Carolina Plantation, lumber to build bridges.

58. Memorandum Book, 1876

Memorandum book of John H. Gay, Jr. son of Rep. Gay, and manager of Oaks Plantation.

59. Memorandum Book, 1882-1883

Memorandum book of Rep. Gay containing entries of purchases or business to attend to in New Orleans, account with Mr. Bruce, medical remedies, and business regarding Oaks Plantation.

60. Memorandum Book, 1883

Memorandum book of Rep. Gay containing entries mentioning back water, ditching and digging, speed of sugar mill engine, and general reminders of work to be done on the plantation.

61. Memorandum book, 1883-1886

Memorandum book of Rep. Gay containing entries concerning needs of Pecan, Union, Dunboyne, Acadia, and St. Louis Plantations; official applications for positions in post office and mint; list of documents filed; addresses of skilled laborers; farm suggestions.

62. Memorandum book, 1889 (March April)

Memorandum book of Rep. Gay pertaining to plantation supplies needed, sugar shipped to John Barkley & Co. from St. Louis and California Plantations.

63. Memorandum book, 1889

Unwritten volume.

64. Memorandum book, 1899

Covers European trip of Edward J. Gay, III.

65. Memorandum book, 1905

Memorandum book of Andrew J. Gay, son of Rep. Gay, containing entries concerning sugar mill machinery and labor, and addresses.

66. Memorandum book, 1908

Memorandum book of Andrew H. Gay, son of Rep. Gay, containing entries concerning cane crop at St. Louis Plantation (including Centennial, True Hope, and Tennessee Plantations) “Leaks” on sugar, addressed, shipments of sugar, and genealogical notes.

67. Memorandum Book, undated

Memorandum book of Rep. Gay stating cash on hand when he left plantation and cost of passage for self and children,

68. Notebook, 1865

Notebook, in French, of Mary Sue Gay, Daughter of Rep. Gay.

69. Notebook, ca. 1865

Rhetorical exercise book of Mary Sue Gay, daughter of Rep. Gay.

70. Notebook, ca. 1865

Physiology notebook of Mary Sue Gay, daughter of Rep. Gay.

71. Notebook, ca. 1865

History notebook of Mary Sue Gay, daughter of Rep. Gay.

72. Notebook, 1866

Notebook of Edward J. Gay, Jr., son of Rep. Gay pertaining principally to this studies in bookkeeping.

73. Time Book, 1872-1874

Time book for the Gay and Garrett Plantation.

74. Time Book, 1872-1872

Time book, for the Gay and Garrett plantation kept by Oscar Robicheaux, plantation manager.

75. Time Book, 1876

Time book kept by Jacob Coleman, probably an overseer.

76. Time Book, 1877

a. Time Book, 1877

b. Cashbook, 1877

Plantation record book showing hours worked, rate of pay and amount received by laborers, and grocery supplies, cash, and sundries issued laborers in payment.

77. Time Book, 1887

Time book by John Henry Martin, probably an overseer, at Ring (old) Plantation.

78. Time Book, undated

Mechanic‟s time book, probably of Rep. Gay, giving workmen‟s names, rate of pay, and cash paid on account.

79. Waybill, 1854-1856

Shipments by Rep. Gay of sugar, molasses, kegs, sweet potatoes and moss to the Edward J. Gay & Co., St. Louis, Mo.

Manuscript Volumes, 1856-1919, undated

80. Journal 1858-1865

a. Journal 1858-1865

b. Cashbook, 1865

Journal of Rep. Gay containing accounts of Hynes Plantation, St. Louis Plantation, David Barrow, Edward J. Gay and Co., Craighead and Johnston, and other. Cashbook of Rep. Gay containing entries including flour, farm tools, clothing, sundries issued blacks, and sales of wood.

81. Ledger, 1869-1872

Account book of Rep. Gay pertaining to St. Louis plantation and showing amounts earned by laborers, including wood, choppers, coopers, ditch diggers, extra hands, and day labor, and payments made in cash, food, clothing, etc.

82. Ledger, 1870-1872

Account book of Rep. Gay pertaining to St. Louis plantation and showing amount earned by Negro and white laborers, day and extra laborers, Chinese, house servants, wood choppers, laborers at Front and Back places, and payments in cash, food, clothing and sundries.

83. Ledger, 1873-1874

Account book of Rep. Gay pertaining to St. Louis and Pecan plantations, and showing amounts earned by Negro and white laborers, house servants, extra laborers, wood choppers, Troxclair & Sons (coopers), and payments made in cash, food, clothing, and sundries. The ledger also contains a statement, 1873, furnished the assessor, Iberville Parish, for Gay and Garrett, Gay and Daigle, Shady Grove, and Woodland Plantations.

84. Payroll Book, 1865, 1867-1869

Payroll book of Rep. Gay for laborers and house servants at Front and Back Places, St. Louis plantation.

85. Payroll Book, 1876-1878

a. Payroll Book, 1878

b. Memorandum Book, 1876-1878

Payroll Book of Rep. Gay for Dunboyne plantation. Memorandum book of Rep. Gay containing medical formulas for treatments of diseases and household suggestions. The book contains a newspaper clipping by Henry Studniczka titled, “The Sugar Interest in the South.”

86. Plantation Report Book, 1901

a. Plantation Report Book, 1901

b. Plantation Diary, 1903 (Oct. Dec.)

Plantation report book of Andrew H. Gay, son of Rep. Gay, pertaining to St. Louis plantation (including True Hope, Tennessee, Centennial and California plantations) consisting largely of crop reports, chemist‟s notes, sugar, molasses, cane, and fuel reports, weather report, stock report (including mules,

machinery, and implements). Plantation diary gives a daily account of mill operations, including work done on Christmas day.

87. Plantation Report Book, 1903

a. Plantation Report Book, 1903

b. Plantation Diary, 1903 (Oct. Dec.)

Plantation report book of Andrew H. Gay, son of Rep. Gay, pertaining to St. Louis plantation including True Hope, Tennessee, Centennial and California plantations, consisting largely of crop reports showing acreage and plats of the plantation. Plantation diary gives a daily account of sugar mill operation, hauling of cane, work accomplished, and weather.

88. Plat Book, 1919

Plat book of property assigned to Lavinia Gay in the partitioning of Edward J. Gay‟s estate.

89. Ration Book, 1858-1865

Ration book of Rep. Gay pertaining largely to clothing, meat, cane knives issued. The book contains directions for tanning (1862) and births and deaths of slaves (1859).

90. Ration Book, 1859-1863

Ration Book, in French, concerning articles of clothing and food issued to slaves on the Craighead and Johnston plantation by Edward J. Gay.

91. Scrapbook, undated

Scrapbook of children of Andrew H. Gay and Mary A. Dickinson consisting of embroidered designs and designs made from colored papers.

92. Sketch Book, 1856

Sketch Book of Mary Dickinson, wife of Andrew H. Gay, son of Rep. Gay.

#93-164 pertain to Senator Edward J. Gay (III)

93. Address Book, undated

Address book containing names of family, friends, and political and business acquaintances.

94. Cane Report Book, 1899-1900

Sugar and cane reports for St. Louis Plantation of the Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Company, including a daily account of grinding activities at the mill.

95. Cash Book, 1896-1897

a. Cash Book, 1896-1897

b. Scrapbook, 1896-1897

Cashbook concerning accounts of Senator Gay as a student, 1896, at Lawrenceville, and1896-1897, at Princeton University. Scrapbook consisting largely of programs and functions attended, 1896, and Lawrenceville; newspaper clippings, and pictures.

96. Cashbook, 1898

Accounts of Senator Gay for personal expenses as a student at Spencer Business College, New Orleans. The book contains copies of poetry.

97 152. Check Stub Books. 1892-1906

153. Memorandum Book, ca. 1896

Memorandum book containing Greek study notes, addresses, quotations, and subscription list to Irving Union.

154. Memorandum Book, 1899

Memorandum book containing entries concerning the European trip of Senator Gay.

155. Memorandum Book, 1899

Memorandum book of Senator Gay containing addresses and entries concerning his European trip and attendance at Spencer Business College in New Orleans.

156. Monthly Report Book, 1897

Report book of the Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Company showing work accomplished and expenses.

157. Notebook, ca. 1888

Penmanship notebook.

158. Notebook, 1897

Notebook of Senator Gay containing elementary plates in mechanical drawing drawn at the John C. Green School of Science.

159. Notebook, 1908-1909

Notes prepares by Leonard from office of W.B. Bloomfield and Edward J. Gay from trip to Avoyelles and Rapides Parishes to study acreage planted in cane, yield, sales, difficulties involved in shipments.

160. Scrapbook, 1880-1889

Scrapbook containing greeting cards, newspaper clipping on Ferdinand de Lesseps, and photograph of boat in swamps.

161. Scrapbook, 1899-1903

Edward J. Gay, commander Brusle Camp, Sons of United Confederate Veterans, Plaquemine, Iberville Parish. Scrapbook consists of General orders, circulars, programs, correspondence, pertaining to the Louisiana Divisions of the United Confederate Veterans and United Sons of Confederate Veterans.

162. Scrapbook, 1918-1919

Newspaper clippings concerning woman suffrage, labor League of Nations.

163. Scrapbook, 1918

Scrapbook consisting of newspaper clippings regarding Senator Gay‟s political campaign.

164. Scrapbook, 1918

Scrapbook consisting of newspaper clippings regarding Senator Gay‟s political campaign.

165. Photograph Album, undated

Photograph album with pictures of family and friends and Christmas and Easter cards sent Edward J. Gay, III when a child.

CONTAINER LIST

Stack

Location

Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

Y:1-62

1

1-9

October, 1796-December, 1822; 156 items

2

10-16

March, 1823-December, 1827; 137 items

3

17-24

January, 1828-December, 1831; 206 items

4

25-33

January, 1832-July, 1833; 212 items

5

34-42

August, 1833-June, 1835; 288 items

6

43-52

August, 1835-June, 1838; 309 items

7

53-60

July, 1838-June, 1839; 176 items

8

61-68

July, 1839-May, 1840; 196 items

9

69-74

June, 1840-December, 1840, undated; 148 items

10

75-82

January, 1841-December, 1841; 201items

11

83-89

January, 1842-September, 1842; 165 items

12

90-97

October, 1842-April, 1843; 186 items

13

98-102

May, 1843-December, 1843; 163 items

14

103-111

January, 1843-December, 1844; 257 items

15

112-121

January, 1845-December, 1845; 267 items

16

122-128

January, 1846-September, 1846; 164 items

17

129-136

October, 1846-March, 1847; 196 items

18

137-143

April, 1847-October, 1847; 181 items

19

144-150

November, 1847-April, 1848; 207 items

20

151-157

May, 1848-May, 1849; 159 items

21

158-166

June, 1849-February, 1850; 205 items

22

167-175

March, 1850-December, 1850; 304 items

Stack

Location

Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

23

176-185

January, 1851-August, 1851; 243 items

24

186-197

September, 1851-April, 1852; 344 items

25

198-205

May, 1852-December, 1852, undated; 233 items

26

206-212

January, 1853-June, 1853; 223 items

27

213-222

July, 1853-February, 1854; 237 items

28

223-231

March, 1854-June, 1854; 211 items

29

232-244

July, 1854-February, 1856; 259 items

30

244-253

March, 1856-December, 1856; 186 items

31

254-266

January, 1857-December, 1857; 213 items

32

267-275

January, 1858-May, 1858; 184 items

33

276-284

June, 1858-November, 1858; 197 items

34

285-297

December, 1858-February, 1859; 297 items

35

298-310

March, 1859-May, 1859; 248 items

36

311-322

June, 1859-October, 1859; 264 items

37

323-337

November, 1859-January, 1860; 320 items

38

338-352

February, 1860-April, 1860; 328 items

39

353-364

May, 1860-September, 1860; 289 items

40

365-379

October, 1860-January, 1861; 320 items

41

380-392

February, 1861-May, 1861; 280 items

42

393-408

June, 1861-December, 1861; 359 items

43

409-419

January, 1862-April, 1862; 295 items

44

420-431

May, 1862-January, 1863; 302 items

45

432-446

February, 1863-January, 1864; 400 items

Stack

Location

Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

46

447-459

February, 1864-June, 1864; 295 items

47

460-473

July, 1864-June, 1865; 268 items

48

474-485

July, 1865-April, 1866; 331 items

49

486-499

May, 1866-December, 1866; 291 items

50

500-513

January, 1867-April, 1867; 306 items

51

514-523

May, 1867-August, 1867; 246 items

52

524-539

September, 1867-December, 1867, undated; 375 items

53

540-552

January, 1868-March, 1868; 332 items

54

553-563

April, 1868-May, 1868; 293 items

55

564-579

June, 1868-August, 1868; 365 items

56

580-594

September, 1868-November, 1868; 334 items

57

595-609

December, 1868-February, 1869; 367 items

58

610-620

March, 1869-April, 1869; 243 items

59

621-633

May, 1869-August, 1869; 309 items

60

634-647

September, 1869-November, 1869; 314 items

61

648-660

December, 1869-January, 1870; 291 items

62

661-670

February, 1870-March, 1870; 218 items

63

671-681

April, 1870-June, 1870; 234 items

64

682-692

July, 1870-September, 1870; 246 items

65

693-703

October, 1870-November, 1870; 249 items

66

704-713

December, 1870-January, 1871; 253 items

67

714-724

February, 1871- March, 1871; 240 items

68

725-736

April, 1871-May, 1871; 262 items

Stack

Location

Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

69

737-752

May, 1871-August, 1871; 405 items

70

753-764

September, 1871-October, 1871; 280 items

71

765-778

November, 1871-December, 1871; 295 items

72

779-792

January, 1872-March, 1872; 330 items

73

793-807

March, 1872-May, 1872; 354 items

74

808-823

June, 1872-August, 1872; 386 items

75

824-839

September, 1872-November, 1872; 370 items

76

840-852

December, 1872-January, 1873; 333 items

77

853-864

February, 1873-March, 1873; 279 items

78

865-877

April, 1873-June, 1873; 314 items

79

878-891

July, 1873-September, 1873; 302 items

80

892-904

October, 1873-November, 1873; 304items

81

905-921

December, 1873-January, 1874; 411 items

82

922-935

February, 1874-March, 1874; 318 items

83

936-948

April, 1874-May, 1874; 320 items

84

949-961

May, 1874-July, 1874; 282 items

85

962-973

July, 1874-September, 1874; 287 items

86

974-990

September, 1874-November, 1874; 432 items

87

991-1007

December, 1874-January, 1875; 379 items

88

1008-1023

February, 1875-April, 1875; 417 items

89

1024-1036

May, 1875-June, 1875; 302items

90

1037-1050

July, 1875-August, 1875; 321 items

91

1051-1063

September, 1875-October, 1875; 278 items

Stack

Location

Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

92

1064-1083

November, 1875-December, 1875; 466 items

93

1084-1097

January, 1876-February, 1876; 332 items

94

1098-1108

March, 1876-April, 1876; 262 items

95

1109-1119

May, 1876-June, 1876; 237 items

96

1120-1131

July, 1876-August, 1876; 247 items

97

1132-1142

September, 1876-October, 1876; 232 items

98

11431155

October, 1876-December, 1876; 315 items

99

1156-1164

December, 1876-January, 1877; 211 items

100

1165-1175

February, 1877-March, 1877; 242 items

101

1176-1184

April, 1877-May, 1877; 182 items

102

1185-1195

May, 1877-July, 1877; 224 items

103

1196-1204

July, 1877-August, 1877; 197 items

104

1205-1214

September, 1877-October, 1877; 242 items

105

1215-1224

November, 1877-December, 1877; 208 items

106

1225-1234

December, 1877, undated; 220 items

107

1235-1245

January, 1878-February, 1878; 228 items

108

1246-1257

March, 1878-April, 1878; 268 items

109

1258-1269

May, 1878-July, 1878; 290 items

110

1270-1278

August, 1878-November, 1878; 197 items

111

1279-1287

December, 1878-December, 1880; 171 items

112

1288-1297

January, 1880-October, 1881; 211 items

113

1298-1308

November, 1881-March, 1882; 263 items

114

1309-1318

April, 1882-August, 1882; 235 items

Stack

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Contents (with dates)

115

1319-1330

September, 1882-March, 1883; 293 items

116

1331-1342

April, 1883-December, 1883; 266 items

117

1343-1349

January, 1884-June, 1884; 153 items

118

1350-1356

July, 1884-December, 1884; 161 items

119

1357-1364

January, 1885-December, 1885; 216 items

120

1365-1378

January, 1886-December, 1886; 312 items

121

1379-1389

January, 1887-June, 1887; 242 items

122

1390-1400

July, 1887-December, 1887; 265 items

123

1401-1413

January, 1888-February, 1888; 299 items

124

1414-1426

March, 1888-April, 1888; 304 items

125

1427-1436

May, 1888-June, 1888; 216items

126

1437-1450

July, 1888-December, 1888; 305 items

127

1451-1463

January, 1889-December, 1889; 287 items

128

1464-1475

January, 1890-December, 1890; 235 items

129

1476-1487

January, 1891-December, 1891; 223 items

130

1488-1497

January, 1892-December, 1892; 201 items

131

1498-1509

January, 1893-September, 1893; 241 items

132

1510-1522

September, 1893-December, 1894; 245 items

133

1523-1528

January, 1895-December, 1896; 132 items

134

1529-1536

January, 1897-October, 1897; 123 items

135

1537-1545

November, 1897-May, 1898; 125 items

136

1546-1554

June, 1898-March, 1899; 173 items

137

1555-1566

April, 1899-September, 1899; 264 items

Stack

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Contents (with dates)

138

1567-1578

October, 1899-December, 1899; 234 items

139

1579-1588

January, 1900-April, 1900; 228 items

140

1589-1600

May, 1900-July, 1900; 270 items

141

1601-1617

August, 1900-November, 1900; 432 items

142

1618-1632

November, 1900-December, 1900; 331 items

143

1633-1650

January, 1901-June, 1901; 400 items

144

1651-1667

July, 1901-November, 1901; 403 items

145

1668-1684

December, 1901-January, 1902; 453 items

146

1685-1700

February, 1902-August, 1902; 352 items

147

1701-1720

September, 1902-November, 1902; 477 items

148

1721-1738

December, 1902-February, 1903; 502 items

149

1739-1759

March, 1903-June, 1903; 572 items

150

1760-1773

July, 1903-October, 1903; 361items

151

1774-1791

November, 1903-December, 1903; 525 items

152

1792-1808

December, 1903-February, 1904; 498 items

153

1809-1823

March, 1904-June, 1904; 494 items

154

1824-1840

July, 1904-November, 1904; 524 items

155

1841-1861

November, 1904-December, 1904; 602 items

156

1862-1878

January, 1905-March, 1905; 554 items

157

1879-1892

April, 1905-May, 1905; 407 items

158

1893-1912

June, 1905-October, 1905; 589 items

159

1913-1927

November, 1905; 486 items

160

1928-1948

December, 1905-February, 1906; 525 items

Stack

Location

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Contents (with dates)

161

1949-1960

March, 1906-June, 1906; 350 items

162

1961-1976

July, 1906-November, 1906; 433 items

163

1977-1988

December, 1906-August, 1907; 281 items

164

1989-2003

September, 1907-January, 1908; 386 items

165

2004-2021

February, 1908-May, 1908; 502 items

166

2022-2036

June, 1908-October, 1908; 426 items

167

2037-2055

November, 1908-March, 1909; 502 items

168

2056-2069

April, 1909-September, 1909; 333 items

169

2070-2086

October, 1909-December, 1909; 482 items

170

2087-2108

January, 1910-July, 1910; 546 items

171

2109-2128

August, 1910-November, 1910; 604 items

172

2129-2151

November, 1910-December, 1910; 614 items

173

2152-2159

January, 1911-March, 1911; 99 items

174

2160-2168

April, 1911-August, 1913; 1936; 1938; 81 items

2169

Slave Lists, undated 6 items

2170

Edward Douglas White Letter, undated 1 item

2171

Writings, undated 13 items

175

2172-2184

undated; 267 items

176

2185-2195

undated; 224 items

177

2196-2211

undated; 378 items

2212

Diagrams, undated 23 items

2213

Maps and Machinery Diagrams, undated 16 items

2214

Petitions, undated 6 items

Stack

Location

Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

178

2215-2222

Printed Items, 1859-1911, 55 items

179

2223-2231

Printed Items, undated 148 items

180

2232-2236

Photographs, 1874-1901, undated 26 items

181

2237-2241

Photographs, undated 17 items

182

2242-2246

Photographs, undated 15 items

183

2247-2252

1884-1890, undated

184

2253-2263

Printed Volumes, loose labels, 1837-1852, 1869-1871, 1875-1876, 1881, 1884, 1889, 1900-1901, undated

Y:81

185

Plantation Photographs Sugar Mill, undated

Y:81

186

Plantation Photographs Sugar Mill, undated

Photographs: Francis P. Butler (1894), Louisiana Congressional Delegation (1888), N.O. River Front (undated), N.O. Street Urchins (undated), Steamboat “Mabel Comeaux” (undated)

Vault:33

1-2

--

78 glass plate negatives

3

--

Democratic National Convention Badge (July 4, 1900)

Vault:1

D-G

--

William T. Sherman letters (Feb. 4 1860, June 17, 1860)

OS:G

1

1

Survey, June 1847, 1 item

2

St. Louis Plantation, Payrolls, February 15 November 1, 1865, 4 items

3

St. Louis Plantation, Labor Contract, February 20, 1865. 1 item

4

St. Louis Plantation, Balance Sheets, January 21 December 21, 1902. 12 items

5-11

St. Louis Plantation, Ledger sheets, April, 1900 1906, 144 items

2

12-15

St. Louis Plantation, Balance Sheets, October 1903 October 1910, 65 items

Stack

Location

Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

OS:G

2

16-21

St. Louis Plantation, Crop Expenses, January 1, 1901 October 1910, undated 93 items

Shelf

22-23

St. Louis Plantation, Ledger Sheets, 1909, 1910. 49 items

3

24-28

St. Louis Plantation Store, Accounts, February 1900 October 1910, 74 items

29

St. Louis Plantation Sugar House, Daily Work Record, December 18, 1900; October 27, 1901 October 31, 1903; October 23 December 3, 1910; 29 items

30

Edward J. Gay Planting and Manufacturing Company, Summary of Accounts, 1904. 12 items

31

Augusta Plantation, Payroll, December 24, 1903-March 5, 1904. 10 items

Shelf

32

Union Plantation (Andrew H. Gay), Ledger Sheets, January 15 October 31, 1910. 20 items

4

33

Union Plantation (Andrew H. Gay), Crop Expenses, January October 1910. 9 items

34

Union Plantation, Balance Sheets, February October 1910. 9 items

35

Union Plantation Store, Accounts, January October 1910. 10 items

36

Possible Sugar Mill Plans, undated 1 item

37

Plan of the Hussey Re-Heater System, Oxnard Sugar Refinery of Brooklyn, New York, undated 1 item

38

Juice Filter, undated 1 item

39

Blueprint of a levee (3/10/1903); Cane Sling Blueprints, Schwartz Foundry Company, Ltd., New Orleans, Louisiana, undated 3 items

40

Cane Juice Strainer, R. Duley and Co., New York, undated 1 item

41

Sketch for a Siphon, undated 1 item

Stack

Location

Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

42

Sugar and Manufacturing Apparatus, undated 1 item

OS:G

4

43

House Plan, drawn by A.H. Gay, Jr., undated 1 item

44

House Plan, undated 1 item

45

House Front Elevation, drawn by J.H. Gay, Jr., undated 1 item

46

Subdivision Maps, Gay Family Property, St. Louis County, Missouri, October 1, 1867, June 13, and November 15, 1871. 3 items

47

Subdivision Maps, Gay Family Property, St. Louis, Missouri, October 8, 1887, undated 4 items

Shelf

49

Property Map, Unidentified, undated 1 item

Shelf

50

Map of Property Adjacent to Mississippi River Plantations, West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, January 9, 1874. 1 item

4

51

Printed Items, October 1890, undated 3 items

52

Display Item, 1906 Calendar, 1 item

53

Time Tables, 1880-1881, 1883-1884, 9 items

Shelf

54

Time Tables, 1883-1884, 9 items

Shelf

55

Time Tables, undated 8 items

4

56

Newspapers, May 1, 1873, January 1881, September 5, 1883, June 4, 1884, August 21, 1884, April 20, 1889, June 28, 1891, March 13, 1893, undated 8 items

57

Plan of Hynes and Craighead Plantation, February 1847 (fragment)

58

Plan of Hynes and Craighead Plantation, March 15, 1847

59

Profile showing Grade, Cuttings, and Cubic yards of excavation on Line of Levels from “D” to “d” July 1847 (see letter form Lathan, Alexander and Company, New York. December 1883)

60

The Hickey Levee, Present Appearance, April 5, 1876

Stack

Location

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Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

61

Map showing orchard arrangement on Hanley Road and Eagle Avenue, near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, ca. 1876

OS:G

4

62

Map of Back Part of St. Louis Estate of Edward J. Gay, February 1877 (fragment)

Shelf

63

Plan and specifications (folders are separate within the larger plan folder) of a two story house (perhaps the one referred to in SKETCHES #1, see letter from George Vail, St. Louis, September 22, 1877

Shelf

64

Sketch of Monument drawn for Gay by A. and D. Dodda and Company, St. Louis, ca. 1871 (see folder 13c, box 18)

Shelf

65

Profile of the Nicaragua Interoceanic Ship Canal, 1888.

Plan of Furnace Door, July 1 1884

Statement showing disbursements and receipts on account of real property for the year ended December 31, 1884, Edward J. Gay, Office, St, Louis, Mo.

Appointment of Edward J. Gay delegate to the annual convention of the National Cotton Planters Association, January 26, 1885.

Appointment of Edward J. Gay delegate to the Mississippi Improvement and Western Waterways Convention, March 25, 1885.

Double Effect Apparatus and Strike ? January 5, 1885.

Assessor's List of Taxable Property, undated

Shelf

66

3 land grants and 2 account sheets (1838-1845)

Shelf

67

Diagram of steamship (undated); map of Bermuda (1892); account journal (1899); Andrew Gay appointments (1892, 1910)

Shelf

68

Plans for 8ft. vacuum pan (undated); watch list for Shady Grove Plantation (1876); diagrams of sugar refinery equipment (October 30, 1873, undated); plats of swamplands (September 30, 1882, February 1881); Survey of land near Oaks Plantation (September 25, 1883); plans for a brick building (June 27, 1883)

5

Engravings: Auguste Chauteau, (undated) ; William Hyde, (undated); John B. Johnson (undated)

Photographs: St. Louis Plantation (undated); White Sulphur Springs (1898); Willie Hynes (undated)

Stack

Location

Box

Folder(s)

Contents (with dates)

H:25-27

Manuscript Volumes, 1825-1919